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FOR REFERENCE 

Do Not Take From This Room 



2009 



Annual Town Report 




Town of Andover 

Massachusetts 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofto2009ando 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



2009 ANNUAL REPORT 




PREPARED BY THE TOWN MANAGER 

PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, 

SECTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND 

ARTICLE II, SECTION 4 OF THE GENERAL BY-LAWS OF 

THE TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Annual Report Cover- This "first portrait" of Abraham Lincoln hangs in the 

Memorial Hall Library. The charcoal with chalk drawing by Charles A. Barry 

depicts Lincoln in 1860 in Springfield, Illinois when he had just been 

nominated as the Republican candidate for President. The portrait was bequeathed to the 

Library by George Henry Torr ofAndover in 1915. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

ANIMAL INSPECTION 72 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 1 

COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 106 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 59 

BUILDING DIVISION 59 

CONSERVATION DIVISION 61 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTION 60 

HEALTH DIVISION 64 

PLANNING DIVISION 67 

PLUMBING, GAS & SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 60 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 69 

COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION 73 

DIRECTORY OF COMMITTEES & BOARDS 10 

DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEADS 15 

ELDER SERVICES DIVISION 77 

FINANCE & BUDGET 19 

ASSESSORS 21 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 19 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER 21 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 22 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 112 

FIRE-RESCUE 35 

FOUNDERS' DAY 16 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 103 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 105 

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 221 

HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 219 

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT 93 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND Ill 

MARGARET G. TO WLE FUND Ill 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 57 

PLANT AND FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 40 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE 41 

ELECTRICAL/MECHANICAL 41 

FACILITIES SERVICES 47 

FORESTRY 46 

PARKS & GROUNDS 45 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 46 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE • 47 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 30 

ANIMAL CONTROL 31 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 31 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 32 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 30 

RECORDS DIVISION 31 

PRESERVATION COMMISSION . . . 109 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 50 

ENGINEERING 50 

HIGHWAY 52 

SEWER 54 

SOLID WASTE / RECYCLING 55 

WATER DISTRIBUTION 54 

WATER TREATMENT PLANT 52 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT . . 90 

TOWN CLERK 26 

TOWN COUNSEL 29 

TOWN MANAGER 4 

TOWN MEETING MINUTES/ELECTION RESULTS 131 

VETERANS SERVICES 86 

YOUTH SERVICES DIVISION 80 



Town of Andover 

Board of Selectmen 



2009 



^SSfC 




2009 Board of Selectmen, from left to right: Gerald Stabile, Jr.; Alex J. Vispoli, Chairman; 
Brian P. Major; Mary K. Lyman; and Ted E. Teichert 



The Town of Andover, more than a place to live, is a way of life. 

Its legacy of democracy shall be preserved. Each citizen should experience the treasures 

of nature, history, individual respect, neighborhood, and learning. As resources and energy 

allow, each of these gifts from the past will be enriched in the present for those yet to be. 

Vision Statement of the Board of Selectmen 



^ m** mm *nn tt.. 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, MA 01810 
(978) 623-8200 

www.andoverma.gov 



Dear Fellow Citizens: 

Once again, it has been my honor to serve you as Chairman of the Board of Selectmen 
over the past year. As our nation continues to struggle through one of the most severe recessions 
in history, the fabric of Andover remains as strong as ever. I am truly amazed at the character, 
spirit, and generosity of the people of this community. 

Despite the difficulties we have faced, this prolonged economic downturn has had a silver 
lining. The fiscal challenges have prompted the Town to roll up its sleeves to seek new ways of 
lowering costs and operating more efficiently. The Board of Selectmen charged a committee of 
information technology professionals to work with a consulting firm to develop a Town-wide 
Strategic Technology Plan for leveraging greater efficiency and productivity, increased 
economies of scale, and enhanced service delivery. The Board also commissioned a study led by 
officials from the Commonwealth's Department of Revenue, Division of Local Services, to 
identify areas for consolidation within the Town's municipal and school finance offices. We 
also assembled a coalition of elected officials from surrounding communities that meet on a 
regular basis to consider ways to regionalize and share various public services. A number of 
cost-saving initiatives have been pursued for the benefit of the taxpayers. 

The Town also has forged ahead with the planning of a number of major projects that will 
help shape the future of our community. Citizen-led committees are currently involved in the 
planning phases of building a new elementary school to replace the Bancroft School; a new 
Town Yard to replace the undersized Lewis Street facility; a new modern Fire sub-station in the 
Ballardvale section of town; and the re-development of the Lewis Street public works site into a 
new revenue producing mixed-use retail business area with direct commuter rail access. 

The Tri-Town Task Force, made up of representatives from Andover, Wilmington, and 
Tewksbury, continued its hard work to craft a unified Form-based Code for the further economic 
development of the Lowell Junction Commercial/Industrial Area, including a new federally 
funded 1-93 interchange, and the long-needed mitigation of commuter traffic through the 
Ballardvale section of town. This major regional effort is one of the largest of its kind in 
Massachusetts. This project, when it ultimately comes to fruition, will help spur Andover' s 
future economic growth, and will honor this community's long tradition of proactive and 
visionary land-use planning. 

As we advance into the second decade of the 21 st century, our community faces many 
obstacles and opportunities. Andover has always taken its challenges head on, and we will 



continue to do so as we move forward together. Please continue to let us know your ideas on 
how to improve the efficiency of delivering services - we appreciate hearing from you. On 
behalf of the Board of Selectmen, we thank you for your continued interest, involvement, and 
participation in your Town government and community of Andover. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Alexander J. Vfspoli 

Chairman, Andover Board of Selectmen 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, MA 01810 
(978) 623-8200 

www.andoverma.gov 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of the Town of Andover: 

February 12, 2009 marked the 200 anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's birth. 
Celebrations were held and editorials were written about his enduring legacy. We, in Andover, 
have our own Lincoln legacy. The cover of the Town's 2009 Annual Report is a picture of the 
chalk and charcoal drawing of Lincoln done by Charles A. Berry in 1 860 that is on display in the 
Memorial Hall Library. How the Library came to acquire the drawing is unknown. What we do 
know is that former Library Director Miriam Putnam read in a 1 947 edition of the Christian 
Science Monitor that an important early Lincoln portrait was missing. She surmised that the 
dusty old Lincoln portrait that hung in the Library may have been that portrait. It was examined 
by experts in the field and deemed to be an authentic Lincoln portrait from 1860! Is it the 
"missing" Lincoln portrait ... we will never know. Thanks to Ms. Putnam, the Town has a 
priceless connection to our 1 6 th President. 

This Annual Report is dedicated to three men who, like President Lincoln, challenged us 
to be true to the "better angels of our nature" - long-time Town Moderator James D. Doherty and 
Selectmen Gerald H. Silverman and Charles H. Wesson, Jr. - all served with distinction. Their 
service spanned over 1 00 years and left us with a local legacy no less than that of President 
Lincoln's. Their passing in 2009 marked the end of a political era. 

If two words could characterize the 2009 Annual Town Meeting it would be "The 
Budget". The current recession and uncertainty over our local revenues and State Aid forced us 
to postpone the Annual Town Meeting from late April to late May. Even with a later Town 
Meeting date, the local revenue and State Aid numbers were still in question. We began FY- 
2010 with a $2.1M deficit. Two Special Town Meetings were held to balance the Budget. In 
late August, voters approved a two percent increase in the local option hotel/motel excise tax - 
increasing it from four to six percent. In October, a Special Town Meeting was held to make a 
variety of line item reductions so that "The Budget" would be balanced and the tax rate set for 
FY-2010. Also at this meeting, the local option meals excise tax (.75%) was approved. 

In September, the Main Street Improvement Project was completed. A celebration was 
held on a beautiful Saturday in October to re-dedicate our attractive Main Street. Over 3,000 
people crowded into the downtown to see the streetscape improvements for themselves and 
enjoy the festival of food and music. It needs to be noted that this $4.5 million MassHighway 
project was finished on time and within budget with minimal disruption for pedestrians and the 
downtown businesses. 



The William Madison Wood Memorial Park on the corner of North Main Street and 
Lowell Street finally received the "suitable monument" for Mr. Wood that was required in the 
will of his son, Cornelius A. Wood. Town staff worked with various Town committees and the 
Wood family to arrive at a design that would educate the public about the life work of William 
M. Wood and his creation of a Utopian community known as Shawsheen Village. The project 
was completed in November and, along with the monument, there is a sign for the park, 
landscaping, benches, a walkway and fence renovation. 

At the Annual Town Election, Sheila M. Doherty was re-elected as Town Moderator. 
Also re-elected were Brian P. Major and Ted E. Teichert to the Board of Selectmen. On the 
School Committee, David A. Birnbach and Annie W. Gilbert replaced Tony James and Arthur 
Barber. Gerald H. Silverman was re-elected to the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 
Technical School District Committee. Jerry passed away in the late Summer and he was 
replaced by Marilyn M. Fitzgerald. 

James E. Sutton retired after sixteen years as the Director of Memorial Hall Library. He 
was replaced by Beth Mazin. 

The Virginia Cole Community Service Award was presented at the Annual Town 
Meeting to Gerald H. Silverman for his outstanding, long-term contributions to the Town of 
Andover as a Selectman, member of the Greater Lawrence Technical School District Committee, 
Cable Advisory Committee, Andover Youth Foundation, teacher, coach, mentor and overall 
community activist. 

In closing, I want to thank the Board of Selectmen for their leadership, direction and 
unselfish service to all the residents of the Town. In addition, I offer a thank you to the 
Department Heads and Town staff for all they do to make Andover a special community. 

Please visit the Town's website at www. ando verma. gov for the latest information about 
your Town. 

It is my distinct honor to serve as your Town Manager. 

Very truly yours, 




Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Mission & Values Statement 

Developed by the 

Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, and Town Department Heads 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen on October 6, 2003 



The mission of the Town of Andover is to ensure the safety, education, and well-being of the 
community; to be a leader in the delivery of efficient and effective quality services that respond to 
community needs; to promote the continuous improvement of staff skills and performance; to 
encourage an environment of trust; to respect cultural and economic diversity; and to preserve the 
historic character of the community. 

The Board of Selectmen, as the chief policy makers for the Town of Andover, Massachusetts, 
will provide leadership in advancing the following primary and supporting values: 



Value 1 - Ensure the safety, education, 
and well-being of the community 

1 . 1 Protect the safety of persons and property 

1 .2 Maintain the high quality of education 
for all 

1 . 3 Maintain the Town' s infrastructure 

1 .4 Promote public health programs and 
awareness 

1 .5 Manage the impact of non-municipal 
public utilities 

1 .6 Support human/community services 

1 .7 Ensure compliance with regulatory 
requirements 

1.8 Identify and promote economic 
opportunities 

Value 2 - Be a leader in the delivery of 
efficient and effective quality services 
that respond to community needs 

2.1 Deliver innovative municipal services 

2.2 Encourage cost saving initiatives 

2.3 Assess and prioritize community needs 

2.4 Maintain the Town's "Aaa" bond rating 

Value 3 - Promote the continuous 
improvement of staff skills and 
performance 

3 . 1 Recruit, develop, and retain a highly 
skilled workforce 



3.2 Promote and recognize municipal 
professionalism 

3.3 Measure, evaluate, and improve 
performance 

Value 4 - Encourage an environment of 
trust and honesty 

4. 1 Uphold high ethical standards 

4.2 Value teamwork and cooperation 

4.3 Promote open communication with the 
public 

4.4 Solicit citizen participation 

4.5 Recognize the outstanding contributions 
of citizens 

Value 5 - Respect cultural and 
economic drversity 

5.1 Promote diversity in the workforce and 
community 

5.2 Provide services that are accessible, fair, 
and equitable 

5.3 Support housing alternatives 

Value 6 - Preserve the historic 
character of the community 

6.1 Celebrate Andover's unique heritage 

6.2 Protect and acquire open space 



The Andover Vision 

As citizens of Andover, we are grateful to those in the past who nurtured the attractive, well managed, and 
vibrant town that we enjoy today. At the same time, we are mindful of our current stewardship and the fragile 
nature of much that we cherish. We have confidence that the most promising approach to the future is to 
acknowledge and act upon the values that we share. This is our Vision and our hopes and commitments for the 
Andover of the future. Vision 21 Committee - July 26, 2004 



QUALITY EDUCATION 

We will offer a rich and challenging public education that 
builds essential skills and knowledge that support a broad range 
of academic and vocational options, enable successful 
participation in our society and culture, and sustain curiosity 
and learning in a world of new and ever changing 
opportunities. We will cultivate the public library as a resource 
for lifelong learning and enrichment and as facilitator for the 
flow of information throughout the community. We will find 
ways to protect the quality of these institutions through 
fluctuating economic cycles. 



FINANCIAL STABILITY 

We will follow prudent financial practices that balance 
consistent high-quality services, private vs. public 
responsibility, stable tax rates, and responsible levels of debt. 
We will set ambitious goals but live within our means. In 
making financial decisions, we will include an understanding of 
long-term costs and consequences, particularly to the 
environmental integrity of the Town. We will consider 
regional partnerships that offer more effective and economical 
options, and we will manage the impact of our decisions on 
property values relative to similar communities. 



OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION 

We will continue to acquire and protect open space as a crucial 
natural resource that helps to maintain the character of the 
town, offers access to both active and passive recreation, and 
provides an important natural system for water recharge, flood 
control, and wildlife habitat. 



HEALTHY AND SAFE ENVIRONMENT 

We will protect public health and safety through careful 
monitoring and enforcement of environmental, health, and 
safety regulations and by continuing to provide effective and 
responsive fire and police protection and beneficial public 
health services. 



VIBRANT DOWNTOWN 

We will maintain our downtown as an attractive and vibrant 
center with a mix of commercial and public activities, historical 
elements, and parks. We will use permits, zoning guidelines, 
and planning approvals to attract and keep pedestrian-friendly 
street-level enterprises. 

SMALL-TOWN CHARACTER 

Even as the Town continues to grow, we will actively seek to 
identify and preserve those elements — town layout and scale, 
central focus, community-wide activities, respect for historical 
structures, and residential mix that give Andover its small-town 
character. 

CITIZEN PARTICIPATION 

We will govern ourselves in a manner that encourages 
participation by all, that consistently provides adequate 
information for making informed choices, and that acts to 
preserve our investment and the interests of the community as a 
whole. We will acknowledge the needs of others and consider 
compromises that are in the best interest of the Town and 
region. 

HISTORICAL HERITAGE 

We will maintain strong and consistent zoning that protects 
historic buildings and places, and we will support the 
institutions that protect and promote Andover' s historical 
heritage. 

CULTURAL DIVERSITY 

We will be respectful of Andover' s many races, ethnicities, 
religious beliefs, and lifestyles. We will facilitate public 
events that celebrate diversity and provide opportunities for 
sharing cultural traditions. As a community, we will not 
tolerate acts of hatred or persecution. 



MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES 

We will manage and protect our natural resources, particularly 
water, in a manner that acknowledges our responsibility to 
future generations and to other communities that share those 
resources. We will monitor air quality and take measures to 
mitigate negative effects of emissions from vehicles, regional 
incinerators, and industrial facilities. 

TOWN SERVICES 

We will provide effective and efficient services that build and 
maintain Town infrastructure, handle Town business, and assist 
citizens. We will use technology to facilitate interdepartmental 
communication and efficiency, and to provide public access to 
Town information. 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Through our department of community services, other Town 
programs, and religious institutions, we will sponsor services 
and programs, facilities, outreach, and recognition to veterans, 
seniors, youth, and the disabled or disadvantaged among us. 
We will foster connections among all citizens to help us to 
appreciate, learn from, and support one another. 

TRANSPORTATION 

We will monitor changing commuting patterns and side-effects 
on air and water quality, noise, and traffic. We will work 
within the region to strengthen opportunities for regional 
transit, rail travel, commuter buses, and improved connections 
with mass transit hubs. We will seek solutions to local needs 
for downtown and commuter parking, for safe and efficient 
traffic flow, and for shuttle service to local facilities and 
services. We will encourage foot and bicycle travel as an 
alternative to automobiles, whenever feasible. 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Community Development Plan 



Background - In January 2000, the Governor issued 
Executive Order 418 providing cities and towns with 
$30,000 to create a Community Development Plan (CDP) 
to address the state's critical housing need while 
simultaneously balancing economic progress, 
transportation issues and open space preservation. The 
CDP's purpose is to encourage people to think about what 
is best for the whole community now and in the future. 
The Department of Housing and Community Development 
approved Andover's CDP in December 2004. As a result, 
Andover continues to be eligible for state funding and 
competitive grants. The Town will also use the Plan's 
conclusions to update the corresponding four sections in 
the 1992 Master Plan. 

Introduction - The Town of Andover is faced with 
several challenges: 1) Housing has become less affordable 
for those who want to live and work, or simply to remain, 
in Andover; 2) Andover must remain economically 
competitive to maintain a stable tax base; 3) Limited 
funding and the continuous development of substandard 
parcels impede the preservation of open space; and 4) 
Residential, commercial, and industrial development at the 
local and regional levels has dramatically increased traffic. 
The foundation of the CDP is the Andover Vision 
Statement. The Vision provides a framework for decision- 
making by Town officials and citizens. Where elements of 
this Plan differ from the Vision, implementation must 
involve balance and compromise, weighing the various 
inputs according to their proportionate value. 

Economic Development Element - Andover has a 
strong local economy that was created through properly 
designed land uses, strong planning, and good positioning. 
In order to be competitive in the changing economy, it is 
recommended that the Town proceed with the following 
economic strategies: 1) Create a new management and 
marketing organization or committee that focuses on local 
business interests while utilizing the marketing skills of 
regional organizations; 2) Consider adopting zoning bylaw 
amendments that encourage a diverse mix of high 
quality/low impact industries and allow the development 
and redevelopment of existing parcels; 3) Improve 
infrastructure and programs that create access to industrial 
land and reduce congestion on local roads; and 4) Seek 
partnerships with Andover's business community. 

Housing Element - Over time, the enhanced economy 
has provided a tax base that created first-rate town 
services, including a high-quality school system, and 
funding for open space preservation. The result is 
increased demand for the remaining land. Housing costs 
have outpaced the region and the nation over the past ten 
years. Due to Andover approaching its build out, greater 
care is needed in planning for future land development. 
Unless measures are taken to protect and increase 



Andover's housing supply, there is a danger that people 
who were raised here and who work here, will no longer 
be able to afford Andover. The solution is coordinated 
expansion of opportunities for different market segments, 
gradually reducing pressure and opening new options. 
Suggested recommendations: 1) Keep designated 
affordable housing units in perpetuity; 2) Provide outreach 
to seniors and encourage elderly housing developments; 3) 
Establish a housing trust fund; and 4) Encourage zoning 
bylaw regulations that reuse old, industrial buildings for 
residential uses, maintain a mix of housing stock, preserve 
neighborhoods and promote new development to be 
moderate in scale. 

Open Space Element - The value of land in Andover 
has become so high; almost every parcel now in private 
hands is vulnerable to housing or commercial development 
within the next few decades. The need to protect critical 
open space areas is necessary to protect Andover's small 
town character, provide recreational opportunities, and 
continue wise management of natural resources. Suggested 
recommendations: 1) Acquire undeveloped portions of 
watershed or protect it through regulations; 2) Encourage 
developers to design subdivisions that protect critical areas 
and provide open space parcels and connections to 
conservation land; 3) Establish alternative linkages and 
trails; 4) Develop a management plan for town-owned 
conservation properties, and budget annually for 
maintenance of conservation areas; 5) Encourage volunteer 
efforts to promote proper use and maintenance whenever 
possible; and 6) Seek funding mechanisms to assist in 
continued acquisition of prioritized undeveloped land. 

Transportation Element - Andover's transportation 
system supports businesses and residences and connects 
Andover to neighboring towns and the regional interstate 
system. Although Andover has an excellent road system, 
there are issues that need attention. Over time, commercial, 
industrial, and residential development has increased the 
number of vehicles and the frequency of use into 
unaccustomed neighborhoods. Suggested recommend- 
ations: 1) Support high-speed transit systems that will link 
Andover with other areas of the Commonwealth and New 
England; 2) Support improvement of the Merrimack 
Valley Regional Transportation Authority's flexible design 
service along with expansion of days and hours of service; 
3) Repair or replace the inadequate bridges; .4) Increase 
bicycle use by providing a range of options; 5) Improve 
access and management of the River Road and Dascomb 
Rd. areas to create more efficient traffic flow and allow 
existing industrial land to be effectively developed; 6) 
Promote zoning and land use regulations that are 
consistent with the region's transportation goals; and 7) 
Build new access from 1-93 to Burtt Road and Lowell 
Junction to allow existing industrial land to be developed 
and decrease vehicle trips on neighborhood roads. 



Results Summary 

2008 Andover Citizens Survey 



Community Life Summary 

Andover is rated as an excellent place to live and 
raise children, with 97% and 96% of respondents 
rating the town as excellent or good in these two 
categories respectively. Overall quality of life 
received a 90% excellent/good rating. The areas of 
weakness appear to be shopping and dining (40% 
rate this as fair), and place to retire (54% rate this 
as fair or poor). In addition, a quarter of 
respondents indicated they were unsure about 
quality of Andover as a place to retire. 

Andover receives high marks for safety and 
appearance, with 96% of respondents rating it as 
excellent or good in terms of feeling safe, and 90% 
rating its overall appearance as excellent or good. 
Public transportation and range of housing options 
received the lowest overall ratings. Violent crime is 
not perceived as a problem in Andover, with 76% 
of respondents strongly disagreeing and 19% 
somewhat disagreeing it's an issue of concern. On 
the other hand, property crime and vandalism 
(though not graffiti) are seen as more relevant 
problems in the community. Overall, most of the 
potential problems that respondents were asked 
about did not seem to be major issues of concern. 
The one exception to this generalization appears to 
be automobile speeding, where half of the 
respondents strongly or somewhat agreed that this 
is a problem issue. 

Andover' s public schools are seen as one of the 
most attractive features of the community, with 
three quarters of the respondents rating it as 
essential or very important in their decision to 
move to and/or stay in Andover. Town services, 
location, and property values were also rated as 
extremely important in attracting respondents to 
Andover and keeping them here. 

There is a strong consensus that Andover' s stock 
of single family housing is appropriate for the 
community, with 85% rating it as just about right. 
Opinion on the amount of multi-family and rental 
housing is more divided, with approximately 20% 
of residents feeling there is too much of these types 
of housing, and another 20% feeling there is not 



enough. Only 1% of residents feel there is too 
much open space/farmland, while a substantial 
number (40%) feel there is not enough of this type 
of property in Andover' s current mix. 

Local Government Summary 

Andover is a town where levels of voting and 
community engagement are high. In terms of civic 
and community participation, voting rates are 
much higher than rates of attendance at Town 
Meeting. Almost 90% of respondents said they had 
voted at least once in the past twelve months, while 
only 40% claimed to have attended the Annual 
Town Meeting. In a separate question, 43% of 
respondents reported attending Town Meeting at 
least once in the past three years. In addition, large 
numbers of residents attend town events (76%), 
donate money to local groups (78%), and shop in 
the downtown district (95%) at least once a year. 

Most of the Town's services were ranked 
positively, with nearly all being rated at excellent 
or good by at least 70% of survey respondents. 
Superior services (with excellent/good scores in the 
90+ range) were: schools, police, fire, EMS, trash 
collection, recycling, library services, parks, and 
handicapped access. Services that received less 
positive ratings were: street repair/maintenance, 
sidewalk maintenance, public parking availability, 
and public transportation, which were ranked as 
fair or poor by 45-50% of citizens. 

Contact with town officials was rated very 
positive, with 85% of survey respondents ranking 
their experience as excellent or good across all 
criteria. 

The Andover Townsman and word of mouth are the 
primary sources of local news and information for 
residents, with over 80% of residents reporting 
they use these sources at least occasionally to keep 
up on local town news. Electronic media, including 
newspaper websites, the town website, other 
websites or blogs, local access television, and 
email networks, were less frequently used by 
respondents as a source of local news. 




DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2009 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Alex J. Vispoli, Ch. 
Mary K. Lyman 
Gerald Stabile, Jr. 
Brian P. Major 
Ted E. Teichert 



ELECTED 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




2010 


Debra R. Silberstein, Ch. 


-2010 


2011 


Dennis F. Forgue 


-2011 


2010 


Richard J. Collins 


-2010 


2012 


Ann W. Gilbert 


-2012 


2012 


David A. Birnbach 


-2012 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

James A. Cuticchia, Ch. -2014 

Francis A. O'Connor - 2010 

Janice Burkholder -2013 

Daniel T. Grams - 201 1 

Calvin A. Deyermond* -2011 

* Appointed by Cabinet Secretary of Executive 
Office of Communities and Development 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL 
SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

Leo J. Lamontagne, Ch., Lawrence - 201 1 
Marilyn M. Fitzgerald, Andover - 2010 
Erica Max, Methuen - 201 1 

Richard Hamilton, Jr., Lawrence - 2012 
Pamela Neilon, Lawrence - 2012 

Thomas Grondine, Methuen -2012 

John Driscoll, North Andover - 201 1 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



Earl G. Efinger, Ch. 
John H. Atchison, Jr. 
Deborah K. Moscal 
Donna C. Ellsworth 
Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 



-2012 
-2012 
-2012 
-2012 
-2012 



TOWN MODERATOR 

Sheila M. Doherty 



-2010 



CORNELL FUND TRUSTEES 

Barbara Brandt-Saret - 20 1 

Elefterios (Ted) J. Georgian - 2012 
Richard J. Bowen - 201 1 



10 



APPOINTED 



TOWN MANAGER - REGINALD S. STAPCZYNSKI 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Joanne F. Marden, Ch. 
S. Jon Stumpf 
Richard T. Howe 
Stephen E. Stapinski 
Paul Fortier 
Margaret N. Kruse 
Mark Merritt 
Mary O'Donoghue 
Cynthia J. Milne 



MAIN STREET COMMITTEE 

Clifford T. Markell, Ch. 
Steven J. Druth 
Judith F. Wright 
Abigail L. O'Hara 
Katherine K. O'Neil 
Ann E. Constantine 
John C. Campbell 
John A. Simko 
Karen M. Herman 
Gary S. Finlayson 

PLANNING BOARD 

Paul J. Salafia, Ch. 

John J. McDonnell 

Vincent A. Chiozzi, Jr. 

Linn N. Anderson 

Joan H. Duff 

Mark J. Yanowitz - Associate Member 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Candace Martin, Ch. 
Katherine Y. Kellman 
Dr. Donald Miller 

CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Zeff Marusich 
John B. Flynn 



TOWLE FUND 

Christopher S. Doherty, Ch. 
John J. Cronin 
Jane Morrissey 



TOWN YARD TASK FORCE 



2012 


Hooks K. Johnston, Jr., Ch. 


-2010 


2010 


Mary Jane Bausemer 


-2010 


2011 


Craig D. Gibson 


-2010 


2012 


James M. Delaney 


-2010 


2011 


Norman J. Viehmann 


-2010 


2012 


David O. Nelson 


-2010 


2010 


David J. Wahr 


-2010 


2010 


Joseph R. Piantedosi 


-2010 


2011 


Paul Materazzo 


-2010 




Jack Petkus, Jr. 


-2010 




CULTURAL COUNCIL 




2010 


Alan Michel, Ch. 


-2010 


2010 


Donald W. Robb 


-2012 


2010 


Linda A. Kirk 


-2010 


2010 


Jennifer Cullen-Struhl 


-2010 


2010 


Susie Novick 


-2010 


2010 


Denise J. Johnson 


-2011 


2010 


John R. Riley, Jr. 


-2010 


2010 


Shelley S. Selwyn 


-2010 


2010 


Kathy S. Abisso 


-2011 


2010 


Judith T. Farzen 


-2011 




FISHBROOK WATERSHED ADV. 


COMM. 


2012 


Stephen S. Boynton, Ch. 


-2010 


2013 


John F. Zipeto 


-2010 


2013 


David J. Adilman 


-2010 


2014 


Richard A. Bizzozero 


-2010 


2014 


Thomas E. Brady 


-2010 


2014 


Patricia M. Donahue 
BOARD OF ASSESSORS 


-2010 


2010 


Dennis M. Adams 


-2012 


2011 


David A. Billard 


-2010 


2012 


Lewis C. Trumbore 
BOARD OF REGISTRARS 


-2012 


2012 


Ronald C. Hajj 


-2012 


2010 


Gregory J. Rigby 


-2011 




William T. Downs 


-2013 




ELDERLY TAX AID COMMITTEE 


2010 


David J. Reilly, Ch. 


-2011 


2012 


Michael Burke 


-2011 


2012 


Klaus Lasch 


-2011 



11 



AUDIT COMMITTEE 

Paul C. Dow, Ch. 
Robert E. Finneran 
Steven G. Caron 
Steven S. Sintros 
Kathleen O. Sherman 



DESIGN REVIEW BOARD 



-2010 
-2012 
-2011 
-2012 
-2011 



HOUSING TRUST FUND TRUSTEES 

Joan Duff, Ch. -2010 

Linda A. O'Connell -2010 

Carolyn Hall Finlay -2010 

Janice Burkholder - 20 1 

Reginald S. Stapczynski - 2012 

Charles W. Wolf ' -2012 

LOWELL JCT. INTERCHANGE TASK FORCE 



Christian C. Huntress, Ch. 
Kerry P. O'Kelly 
Dorie A. Resnik 
Beth A. Niemi 



-2011 
-2011 
-2011 
-2011 



BALLARD VALE FIRE STATION BLG. COMM. 



Daniel S. Casper, Ch. 
James T. Curtis 
George Thomson 
Michael Igo 
John J. Kiely 
Emily M. Samansky 
Rebecca A. Backman 



-2011 
-2011 
-2011 
-2011 
-2011 
-2011 
-2011 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Karen M. Herman, Ch. - 20 1 1 

Carolyn A. Fantini -2010 

Laurence J. Lamagna - 2012 

Matthew L. Russell - 20 1 

Mark N. Spencer -2012 

AnnHandley -2011 

SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Mark B. Johnson, Ch. - 201 1 

Francine Goldstein - 201 1 

Dr. Claudia L. Bach -2011 

Joseph R. Piantedosi - 201 1 

Anthony H. James - 20 1 1 

Thomas R. Deso -2011 

Joseph J. Reilly -2011 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Richard D. Lindsay, DVM - 20 1 



Ann E. Constantine, Ch. 


-2010 


Craig D. Gibson 


-2011 


Steven J. Druth 


-2012 


Suzanne L. Korschum 


-2011 


Anita M. Renton 


-2010 


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE 


Leonard F. D'Innocenzo, Ch. 


-2012 


George J. Cordina 


-2012 


Kurt Guthmann 


-2012 


Neil B. Magenheim 


-2012 


Barbara Morache 


-2012 


Raymond Tode 


-2012 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY TRUSTEES 


Dr. Paul F. Caselle, Ch. 


-2011 


John S. Bigelow 


-2011 


Arthur H. Richter 


-2012 


Sandra L. Dearborn 


-2010 


Jennifer B. Smith 


-2010 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 




Donald D. Cooper, Ch. 


-2011 


Alexander Driscoll 


-2012 


Howard M. Kassler 


-2011 


Michael Walsh 


-2012 


Gail L. Ralston 


-2012 


Alan F. French 


-2010 


Jon M. Honea 


-2010 


PRESERVATION COMMISSION 




Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2012 


Craig D. Gibson 


-2010 


Norma A. Gammon 


-2011 


James S. Batchelder 


-2012 


Leslie A. Frost 


-2011 


Leo M. Greene 


-2010 


RECYCLING COMMITTEE 




Keri L. Stella 


-2012 


Marya Chapin Lundgren 


-2010 


Alanna McKee 


-2010 


Scott D. Stecher 


-2011 


Donald Gottfried 


-2010 


Anthony Connell 


-2010 


VETERANS SERVICES AGENT 





Michael Burke 



2010 



12 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 




TRIAD COUNCIL 




Stephen D. Anderson, Ch. 


-2011 


Richard Tyler, Ch. 


-2012 


Carol C. McDonough 


-2010 


Ethel A. Olsen 


-2012 


Nancy K. Jeton 


-2012 


Alvin E. Harvey 


-2012 


Lynne S. Batchelder 


-2010 


Nancy A. Bailey 


-2012 


David W. Brown 


-2011 


Dorothy L. Bresnahan 


-2012 


Rachel Baime - Associate Member 


-2010 


Sandra C. Karp 


-2012 


Shelley Ranalli - Associate Member 


-2012 


Mary Joyce Kernan 


-2012 






Russell D. Ouellette 


-2012 


COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 




BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMM. 


Justin J. Coppola, Ch. 


-2011 


James L. Sheldon, Ch. 


-2010 


Jami Cope 


-2010 


Diane R. Derby 


-2011 


Bernadette Lionetta 


-2010 


Ronald J. Abraham 


-2012 


Justin J. Coppola, Jr. 


-2010 


Bruce S. Taylor 


-2012 


Julie Pike 


-2010 


Leo M. Greene 


-2012 


Madelaine St. Amand 


-2012 


Sherry E. Kirby 


-2011 


Gilbert DeMoor 


-2011 


David J. Hart 


-2010 


Patricia A. Commane 


-2011 


Madelyn I. Mitton - Alternate Members 


-2011 


Ruth A. Rosensweig 


-2011 






HOUSING PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE 


SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 




Lelani B. Loder, Ch. 


-2011 


David J. Reilly 


-2010 


Francis A. O'Connor 


-2011 


Janis T. Hill 


-2010 


Jonathan D. Fuller 


-2011 


Elizabeth Roos* 


-2010 


Vinod K. Bhandari 


-2010 


Cherish Brunet 


-2010 


Evan G. Belansky 


-2011 


Rosalie Konjoian 


-2010 


Williams S. English 


-2011 


Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 


-2010 



* Superintendent's Appointee 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Vincent P. Cottone, Co-Ch. 
Jo-Ann Deso, Co-Ch. 
Patricia D'Ambra Tovey 
Judith G. Trerotola 
Nancy S. Gump 
Mary Jane Bausemer 
Burt M. Phinney 
Mary L. Ryan 
Francis A. O'Connor 
Joan C. Foohey 
Emily S. Kearns 
Ann M. O' Sullivan 
Katherine E. Grondin 
Nancy M. Mulvey 



PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 



-2012 
-2012 
-2010 
-2010 
-2010 
-2011 
-2011 
-2011 
-2010 
-2010 
-2011 
-2010 
-2012 
-2010 



Calvin A. Deyermond, Ch. 
Michael Burke 
Michael B. Mansfield 
John J. Lewis 
Joseph D. McCloskey 
Robert S. Hamilton 
James Bedford 
Susan W. Ratyna 
Stephen H. Wallingford 
Joseph V. Leone 
R. Scott Parrish, Jr. 
Calvin G. Perry 



-2010 
-2010 
-2010 
-2010 
-2010 
-2010 
-2010 
-2010 
-2010 
-2010 
-2010 
-2010 



DIR. OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo - 20 1 



KEEPER OF THE LOCKUP 

Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 



2010 



GR. LAWRENCE COMM. ACTION COUNCIL 

Judith M. Yelle -2012 



GR. LAWR. SANITARY DISTRICT REP. 

DPW Director John A. Petkus, Jr. - 20 1 



13 



RETIREMENT BOARD 



GREEN ADVISORY BOARD 



James A. Cuticchia, Ch. 


-2011 


Gregory M. Sebansky 


-2012 


Robert J. 0' Sullivan 


-2011 


Patricia C. Russell 


-2012 


Elena M. Kothman 


-2010 


Iric L. Rex 


-2012 


Anthony K. Stankiewicz, Esq. 


-2011 


Melanie Cutler 


-2012 


Rodney P. Smith, Ex-Officio 




Girish S. Rao 


-2012 






Brian Salazar 


-2012 


FOREST WARDEN 




Leland E. DiMeco 


-2012 


Fire Chief Michael B. Mansfield 


-2010 


Joanna Reck 


-2012 






Kathleen M. Kirby 


-2012 


MERR. VALLEY REG. TRANSIT AUTHORITY 


MERR. VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION 


Planning Director Paul T. Materazzo 


-2010 


Paul J. Salafia 


-2010 


Senior Planner Lisa Schwarz, Alternate 


-2010 


John J. McDonnell, Alternate Member 


-2010 


IPSWICH RIVER WATERSHED 








MANAGEMENT COUNCIL 









Water Treatment Plant Supt. John Pollano - 2010 



14 



TOWN OF ANDOVER DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEAD DIRECTORY 



Community Development & Planning Department 
Health Director 
Planning Director 
Conservation Administrator 
Inspector of Buildings 
Electrical Inspector 
Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector 

Community Services Director 

Elder Services Director 

Emergency Management Director 

Finance and Budget Department 
Finance Director 
Chief Assessor 
Collector/Treasurer 
Information Systems Manager 
Purchasing Agent/Insurance Coordinator 

Fire Chief 

Human Resources Director 

Plant and Facilities Department 
Director 

Superintendent of Building Maintenance 
Superintendent of Parks and Grounds 
Superintendent of Plumbing, Heating and Electrical 

Police Chief 

Operations Commander 

Public Works Department 
Director 

Highway Superintendent 
Superintendent of Water & Sewer Distribution 
Town Engineer 

Memorial Hall Library Director 

Superintendent of Schools 

Town Accountant 

Assistant Town Accountant 

Town Clerk 

Assistant Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Town Manager 

Assistant Town Manager 

Veterans Service Agent 

Youth Services Director 



Thomas G. Carbone 

Paul T. Materazzo 

Robert J. Douglas 

Kaija M. Gilmore 

Paul J. Kennedy 

Bruce P. Hale 

Mary L. Donohue 

Katherine D. Urquhart 

Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 

Anthony J. Torrisi 

David A. Billard 

David J. Reilly 

Barbara D. Morache 

Elaine M. Shola 

Michael B. Mansfield 

Candace A. Hall 

Joseph R. Piantedosi 

Edward S. Ataide 

Randy H. Pickersgill 

Ralph D. Knight 

Brian J. Pattullo 
Lt. James D. Hashem 

John A. Petkus, Jr. 

Christopher M. Cronin 

Morris B. Gray 

Brian W. Moore 

Beth Mazin 

Dr. Claudia L. Bach 

Rodney P. Smith 
Theodora K. Moccia 

Randall L. Hanson 
Kathleen F. McKenna 

Thomas J. Urbelis 

Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Steven S. Bucuzzo 

Michael Burke 

William D. Fahey 



15 



FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL FOUNDERS' DAY - MAY 14, 2009 

FOUNDERS ' DA Y WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN IN 1965 TO MARK 
THE DATE OF THE TOWN'S INCORPORATION ON MAY 6, 1646. 

HONORING TOWN AND SCHOOL EMPLOYEES 
WITH TEN OR MORE YEARS OF DEDICATED SERVICE 

TOWN DEPARTMENTS 



30 Years of Service: 



Mary S. Donohue, Community Services 
William R. Valentine, Fire Rescue 



Anthony J. Torrisi, Finance Director 



25 Years of Service: 



Bruce L. Belbin, Fire Rescue 
Bruce P. Hale, Community Development 
Patrick F. O'Hagan, Plant & Facilities 
John J. Twomey, Dept. of Public Works 



Katherine R. Belczyk, Library 

Susan E. Moore, Assessor's Office 
James J. Palen, Dept. of Public Works 
Patricia E. Ward, Dispatch 



20 Years of Service: 



Mark D. Conlon, Fire Rescue 
Jeanne A. Doucette, Elder Services 
Donald E. Hinckley, Fire Rescue 
Shawn P. Kelley, Fire Rescue 
Joseph E. Pietrowski, Plant & Facilities 
Todd D. Richardson, Fire Rescue 
Michael A. Surrette, Fire Rescue 



Mary E. Bevacqua, Library 
Randall L. Hanson, Town Clerk 
Charles R. Kearn, Dept. of Public Works 
William D. Loehr, Fire Rescue 
Colin D. Radford, Police Department 
Robert A. Stabile, Fire Rescue 



1 5 Years of Service: 



Philip R. Boulanger, Fire Rescue 
Matthew E. Burke, Fire Rescue 
Richard M. Edson, Police Department 
William D. Fahey, Youth Services 
Alex P. Gioia, Plant & Facilities 
Jacqueline M. Moses, Fire Rescue 
James E. Sutton, Library Director 



Linda M. Bredbury, Plant & Facilities 
Patricia A. Crafts, Community Development 
Donald N. Eisenhaur, Dept. of Public Works 
Florence S. Feldman-Wood, Library 
Elena M. Kothman, Retirement Services 
William J. Ouellette, Police Department 



10 Years of Service: 



Scott Bernard, Dept. of Public Works 

Jesus M. De La Cruz, Plant & Facilities 

Terrie L. Floyd, Library 

Kyle P. Murphy, Fire Rescue 

Robin R. Redman, Town Clerk's Office 

Jeffrey C. Ring, Plant & Facilities 

Keith D. Weightman, Fire Rescue 

Ronald Wetmore, Community Development 



Christopher Clemente, Comm. Development 
Geraldine Deyermond, Library 
Kurt Kefferstan, Dept. of Public Works 
Stephen R. Neal, Police Department 
Luis F. Resendes, Dept. of Public Works 
Judith A. Ring, Town Clerk's Office 
Jeffrey B. Wells, Fire Rescue 



16 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

40 Years of Service: 

William Drummond, Andover High 

35 Years of Service: 

Patricia M. Sweeney, West Elementary 

30 Years of Service: 

Lori A. Bellingreri, West Middle 
Timothy M. Kolodgy, Doherty Middle 
Craig B. Simpson, Andover High 

25 Years of Service: 



Eileen M. Seavey, South Elementary 



Peggy F. Cain, Andover High 

Brenda C. O'Brien, High Plain Elementary 



Mary Ellen Dahlstrand, High Plain Elementary 

Colleen Georgian, South Elementary Charles M. Keeler, Andover High 

Sandra J. Lunt, West Middle Maria-Theresia Meyer, Andover High 

Judith C. Piolunek, West Middle Holly B. Plamondon, West Elementary 

Beth N. Shiff, High Plain Elementary 



20 Years of Service: 



Deborah E. Burch, Andover High Jane E. Chapin, West Elementary 

Linda L. Deangelo, South Elementary Catherine J. DeFiore, Substitute 

Nancy M. DiSalvo, Sanborn Elementary Elizabeth A. Dufton, West Elementary 
Rosalie F. Konjoian, High Plain Elementary Sandra J. Mickee, Bancroft Elementary 
Lana H. Reuss, Wood Hill Middle Lynn N. Ricker, Doherty Middle 

Mary Jane Sonntag, Andover High Heather Sullivan, High Plain Elementary 



15 Years of Service: 



Jason I. Andrews, Substitute 
Patricia M. Betty, West Elementary 
Clare F. Ciampa, Andover High 
Ellen M. Dowaliby, Bancroft Elementary 
Rebecca J. Franks, West Middle 
Martha Gibson, Shawsheen Elementary 
Ann F. Levinson, West Middle 
Sally W. Magner, High Plain Elementary 
Rosemary E. Pinksten, South Elementary 
Virginia L. Rossini, West Middle 
William J. Scanlon, Bancroft Elementary 
William F. Townsend, Andover High 
Lydia L. Wise, South Elementary 



Kathleen L. Bartholomew, West Elementary 
Dianne M. Caraviello, Bancroft Elementary 
Nancy R. Daigle, West Elementary 
William G. Fleischmann, Wood Hill Middle 
Joan Friedman, Sanborn Elementary 
Joseph R. Hadley, Technology Department 
Janice M. Lewis, Bancroft Elementary 
Linda C. O'Donnell, South Elementary 
Mary R. Robinson, Business Office 
Sheila M. Salois, Andover High 
Christine E. St. Jean, Bancroft Elementary 
Janet M. Volker, Food Services 



10 Years of Service: 



Martha K. Anderson-Keleher, West Elementary 

Jaime L. Batchelder, South Elementary Shanna L. Beal, High Plain Elementary 

John Berube, Andover High Stephen L. Bessette, Doherty Middle 

Doreen M. Bille, Business Office Hillary R. Brooks, Wood Hill Middle 



17 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



10 Years of Service (Cont): 

Lisa M. Brouillard, West Middle 
Elena C. Emory, Andover High 
Debra L. Fullam, West Elementary 
David T. Hughes, West Middle 
Nancy L. Kumph, West Middle 
Rebecca Ledig, Andover High 
Sally S. Mandelbaum, Wood Hill Middle 
Candice R. McVeigh, Andover High 
Kathleen O'Connor, Bancroft Elementary 
Laura B. Pierce, High Plain Elementary 
David J. Piscia, Doherty Middle 
Lauren J. Ream, Andover High 
Martha Reeder, Sanborn Elementary 
Phyllis M. Russell, Food Services 
Jacqueline J. Salvesen, Andover High 
Deanna M. Taxiarhos, Pupil Personnel 
Cheryl Todisco, South Elementary 
Sarah B. Wallace, Sanborn Elementary 
Mary Lu Walsh, Doherty Middle 



Jeffrey Buckridge, Doherty Middle 
Helen F. Fitzgerald, Andover High 
William Hecht, Andover High 
Susan E. Hunter- Jones, Sanborn Elementary 
Kimberly C. Ladd, South Elementary 
Corie D. Little, Bancroft Elementary 
Tamara MacAllister, Bancroft Elementary 
Marianne C. Merritt, High Plain Elementary 
Mariska N. Pierce, West Elementary 
Renee M. Pierce, High Plain Elementary 
Debra M. Prudden, South Elementary 
Susanne C. Rech, South Elementary 
Mary E. Robb, Andover High 
Robyn H. Russo, West Elementary 
Lisa T. Singer, Pupil Personnel 
Stephen L. Tisbert, Wood Hill Middle 
Diane M. Waddell, Sanborn Elementary 
Helen E. Waller, High Plain Elementary 
Laraine L. Woo, Sanborn Elementary 



18 



FINANCE & BUDGET DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Finance Department is to build and reinforce confidence in Town 
financial management by managing and planning all financial functions in an efficient, cost 
effective and responsive manner, and, through a collaboration of team efforts, provide departments 
and the public with the necessary information to assure accuracy, accountability and justification. 

FINANCE ADMINISTRATION 

The Town Manager's Recommended Fiscal Year 2010 Budget was released on February 6, 
2009. During the months of February, March, and April meetings were held with the Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee, School Committee and department heads to review the budget and 
warrant article requests and prepare recommendations for the Annual Town Meeting. 

In May, the Finance Committee Report was mailed to over 1 1,300 households. The Annual 
Town Meeting began on Tuesday, May 26,2009 and the Fiscal Year 2010 operating budget 
(Article 4 and Article 8) was adopted in the amount of $134,138,219. This budget was an increase 
of $2,448,169 or 1.9% over the Fiscal Year 2009 operating budget of $131,690,050. However, 
subsequent reductions in State and local revenues required additional Town Meeting action to 
balance the FY2010 Budget. 

In August, a Special Town Meeting adopted an increase in the local hotel/motel room 
excise tax from 5% to 7%. In October, a Special Town Meeting reduced budgets by $2,074,353 
and a private article passed to add a local .75% meals tax. The final FY2010 operating budget 
(Article 4 and Article 5) was adopted in the amount of $132,063,866 or only $373,816 over the 
FY2009 Budget. 

Some of the major accomplishments for 2009 follow: 

Prepared the Town Manager's Recommended FY-2010 Budget. 
Prepared the Five- Year Capital Improvement Plan for FY-201 1 - FY-2015. 
Provided staff support to the Finance Committee. 

Produced the 2009 Finance Committee Report for the Annual and Special Town Meetings. 
Worked with all departments to implement a financial plan to respond to mid-year 
reductions in State and local revenues for the FY-2009 year end. 
■ Worked with the all departments, the Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen to 
prepare a plan to balance the FY-2010 Budget for Special Town Meetings. 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 

In 2009, the Purchasing Division processed approximately 1,155 purchase orders and 
3,138 requests for payment for the Town and 2,867 purchase orders and 471 requests for 
payment for the School Department. During this period there were approximately 43 bids, 12 
requests for proposals and 2 requests for written responses that were advertised and officially 
opened. The continued utilization of the State bid contracts available to cities and towns has 
provided numerous benefits to the taxpayers of Andover. 



19 



Throughout 2009, Andover has initiated and coordinated a number of Cooperative Bids 
as well as participated in a number of these bids with other communities. Under Massachusetts 
General Laws, two or more political subdivisions may jointly purchase goods or services through 
the bidding process. Some of the items purchased were: xerographic paper for copy machines, 
road salt, water treatment chemicals, fuel oils, vehicle fuels, office supplies, equipment and 
furniture and school athletic and student voluntary insurance. 

Some of the major requests for proposals and bids solicited in 2009 were: 

Recreation Park - Softball Field Lighting Replacement 

Installation of Water Meters and drive-by frequency read system 

Sanborn Elementary School Electrical Service Upgrade 

Roof Replacement Project - Andover Public Schools 

One new un-used Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer with software for the Water 

Treatment Plant 

Regular K- 1 2 School Bus Transportation 

Mid-day Kindergarten Transportation 

Extra-curricular Field Trip and Athletic Transportation 

William M. Wood Memorial Park Project 

Scholar, Fine Art, Athletic, Medical and Custodian Supplies 

Physical Education Supplies & Equipment 

Miscellaneous Sidewalk Re-construction and Concrete Wheelchair Ramps 

Miscellaneous Roadway Construction and Paving Projects 

Design & Construction Administration Services for Removal and Replacement of 

Exterior Stairs, Entrance Repair, Removal & Replacement of Exterior Stairs and Entrance 

Ramp and Repairs to the Front Facade at the Veterans Memorial Auditorium/Doherty 

Middle School 

Bridge Repairs & Safety Improvements - Stevens Street and Balmoral Street Bridges 

Compost Site Grinding and Screening 

Professional Engineering Services and Sewerage Works Improvements for the 

Shawsheen River Outfall Interceptor Rehabilitation 

Turnkey Design, Purchase and Installation of a 2KW Potovoltaic System for the Doherty 

Middle School 

Billing Service for Emergency Services/Motor Vehicles Accidents 

Design and Construction Administration Services for West Middle School - Boiler 

Replacements 

Emergency Medical Dispatch Program - Software and Training for the Andover Police 

Department 

Professional Engineering Services for the Andover Street Bridge Repairs 

Consultant Services for Town-wide Strategic Information Technology Plan 

Consultant Services to Develop a Smart Growth Overlay District Study for the Existing 

Town Yard 

Design Services for the Bancroft Elementary School Feasibility Study 

On-Call Engineering Services for Non-Building Projects 

Proposed Drainage Improvements for Andover High School Field House Parking Lot 

Partial Window Replacement at Memorial Hall Library 



20 



■ Roof Replacement for Water Treatment Plant, Memorial Library and Various Town 
Buildings 

One new 2009 or current model year 1 5-Passenger Bus 

■ Three new 2010 model Marked Law Enforcement Full-Size Sedans and One new 2010 
Model Administrative Full-Size Sedan with Street Appearance Package 

• Cooperative Bid for Highway Road Salt, Solar Salt and Liquid Calcium Chloride 32% 

■ One new 2009 or 20 1 Full-Size »/ 2 Ton Regular Cab 4 x 4 Pickup Truck 
Three new 2010 Small Commercial Cargo Vans 

The Purchasing Division is also responsible for administering the contract compliance of 
Andover's Affirmative Action Plan as well as coordinating the Property and Casualty insurance 
and risk management for all Town and School Departments. The Purchasing Division is also 
responsible for overseeing the Town's current insurance company's Rewards Program that helps 
control and reduce losses along with providing future savings on insurance premiums. Again this 
year, the Town of Andover was recognized by its insurance company, Massachusetts Interlocal 
Insurance Association (MIIA), for its High Achievement under their Loss Control Program. 
Participation in the MIIA Rewards Program earned the Town a $26,623.00 credit on its insurance 
premium. The Purchasing Division also processed approximately 47 casualty and property 
claims over the year and was able to recover $173,652.60 for the Town. 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER 

The Collector/Treasurer Division is responsible for the collection, investment and 
disbursement of all Town monies. Highlights during 2009 are as follows: 

■ Borrowed $5,556,500 for 1 year at .5% on March 25 th . 

- Borrowed $6,893,000 for 20 years at 3.79 on March 25 th . 

Completed the implementation of the new Continental water billing and accounts 
receivable software system. 

■ Began the implementation of the new automatic water meter reading program. 
Continued with outstanding customer service in all areas of real estate, excise and water. 

ASSESSOR 

The Board of Assessors is responsible for the valuing of all real estate and personal 
property accounts and motor vehicle excise taxes in the Town, as well as defending all appeals of 
these taxes. The three-member board is also responsible for the awarding of nearly 230 property 
tax exemptions on an annual basis. Major exemption groups include senior citizens, disabled 
veterans, widows and widowers and individuals classified as blind. 

The Assessors must also conduct revaluations of all property on a triennial (every three 
years) basis. A revaluation was completed for Fiscal Year 2009. Interim adjustments were 
made in Fiscal Year 2010. The Board is responsible for meeting all Massachusetts Department 
of Revenue guidelines for property valuations, reporting of valuations and tax billing. 

The Assessor's Division gathers a vast amount of property and ownership related 

21 



information that is available to the general public. Exterior digital photos are now recorded on 
all properties and valuations, sales information and other pertinent information is available on 
the Town's web site. More than 1,000 requests for public records and information are received 
and processed on an annual basis. 

The Assessor's Division completed the valuation process for FY2010 in a manner that 
allowed for timely tax billing. The Division, along with other financial staff, submitted all 
assessment and tax rate related information for approval using the Division of Local Service's 
Gateway Software. 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The Information Systems Division is responsible for maintaining and improving the 
utilization of computerized data in municipal operations including financial records, word 
processing/spreadsheet/database files, electronic transmission and other varied electronic files. 
Major functions of this division are: network administration, financial application support and 
reporting, user support for office integration software, and hardware/software/operating system 
maintenance and upgrades. The Information Systems Division supports all users of the network 
and strives to meet the many diversified needs of town government administration. Maintaining 
the integrity and improving the accessibility of all data on the network are priorities, especially 
since most users rely on network resources for daily operations. 

Highlights during the year include the following: 

Completed the conversion of 2.5 years of water history to CUSI Utility Billing Software. 
Completed the implementation of Utility Billing Software. 

Worked with Winwater to provide account and meter data and assisted the Treasurer's 
Office and Water Department to facilitate the Town-wide water meter radio-read 
replacement project. 

Tested and began the implementation of the newest operating systems of Windows Server 
2008 R2 and Windows 7. 

Virtualization - tested and began transition of servers to virtual machines on Microsoft's 
free virtualization technology: Hyper-V. 

Participated with the IT Committee to continue discussion concerning efficiencies; 
worked on Request for Proposal to hire a consultant to perfect an Assessment and 
Strategic Plan. 

Assisted the Department of Public Works with the transition to a new GIS server, 
including the update of applications to work with the Vista desktop operating system. 
Continued with scheduled replacement of out-dated desktops and printers via CIP funds. 
Worked with the Division of Community Services for a successful application upgrade 
including Access to Live Program information and online registration. 
Facilitated a major upgrade of Laserfiche (document management application). 
Implemented the automation of additional electronic reporting requirements. 
Collaborated with the School IT Department to decide upgrade path for financial 
software. 
■ Continued to maintain/improve Town website to provide information to residents. 



22 



BUDGET AND TAX RATE SUMMARY 

EXPENDITURES 


FINAL 

FY2008 

130,190,002 

4,000 

1,248 



64.202 


FINAL 
FY2009 

134,309,458 

4,000 

63,205 

223,700 



73.068 


FINAL 
FY2010 

132,409,866 

4,000 

201,761 

38,885 



62.671 


Appropriations & Articles 

Other Local Expenditures 

Tax Title Purposes 

Final Court Judgments 

Overlay/ Other Deficits 

Other amounts 

Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 

Total Other Local Expenditures 

State and County Charges 

Overlay Reserve for Abatements 
TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

REVENUES and OTHER FUNDING SOURCES 


69,450 

2,874,461 
832.176 


363,973 

2,873,157 
1.127.947 


307,317 

3,079,417 
862.417 


$133,966,089 

9,962,504 
1.894.649 


$138,674,535 

10,764,225 
1.551.447 


$136,659,017 

9,574,225 
1.551.447 


Revenue from State 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 
School Construction Assistance 
Total from State 

Revenue from Town 

General Local Revenue 

Revenue for Specific Purposes-Offset Receipts 

Water and Sewer Revenue 

Total Local Receipts 

Free Cash and Other Funding Sources 
Free Cash used for Warrant Articles 
Other Available Funds 
Total Free Cash and Other Funding Sources 

Free Cash used for Operating Budget 

Total Non-Property Tax Revenues and Other Funding Sources 

Total Property Taxes 
TOTAL REVENUES 


11,857,153 

9,383,000 

1,964,605 

12.892.816 


12,315,672 

9,803,000 

1,691,964 

13.526.502 


11,125,672 

8,879,764 

1,923,063 

12.774.627 


24,240,421 

2,820,368 
258.428 


25,021,466 

1,183,147 
1.597.496 


23,577,454 

334,000 
292.163 


3,078,796 

712,000 

| 39,888,370 
94.077.719 


2,780,643 

580,000 

40,697,781 
97.976,754 


626,163 

35,329,289 
101.329,728 


; 133,966,089 


138,674,535 


136,659,017 





FINAL 


FINAL 


FINAL 


VALUATIONS & TAX RATES 


FY2008 


FY2009 


FY2010 


TOTAL VALUATION (IN THOUSANDS) 


$7,179,753 


$7,160,470 


$6,837,657 


RESIDENTIAL TAX RATE 


11.69 


12.16 


13.19 


COMM, IND, PER PROP TAX RATE 


19.13 


19.98 


21.33 


EQUALIZED TAX RATE 


13.10 


13.68 


14.82 



23 



Assessors Annual Report 2009 







ANNUAL PROPERTY VALUATIONS 






FY2007 


FY2007 


FY2008 


FY2008 


FY2009 


FY2009 


PROPERTY TYPE 


#ACCTS 


VALUE 


#ACCTS 


VALUE 


#ACCTS 


VALUE 


SINGLE FAMILY 


8,459 


$5,006,022,800 


8,480 


$4,919,136,300 


8,484 


$4,656,528,600 


CONDO 


1,475 


367,276,700 


1,558 


398,264,000 


1,570 


388,732,400 


MULTI FAMILY 


335 


256,129,300 


318 


243,441,700 


315 


229,151,600 


VACANT LAND 


584 


96,945,600 


538 


77,179,800 


556 


79,559,500 


OTHER RESIDENCE 


28 


21,571,500 


21 


15,027,600 


21 


14,039,200 


COMMERCIAL AND CHAPTER 


257 


558,958,866 


270 


558,906,023 


272 


541,868,527 


INDUSTRIAL 


138 


540,662,900 


139 


551,109,200 


139 


529,981,300 


MKED USE 


181 


244,141,900 


175 


236,081,600 


171 


225,257,500 


PERSONAL PROPERTY 


447 


99,325,718 


514 


161,324,140 


622 


172,538,617 


TOTAL 


11,904 


$7,191,035,284 


12,013 


$7,160,470,363 


12,150 


$6,837,657,244 



TOTAL 
Number of bills 



FISCAL YEAR EXCISE COMMITMENTS 



FY2007 
$4,801,133 

31,581 



FY2008 
$4,860,718 

32,078 



FY2009 
$4,561,372 

31,395 









TAX ABATEMENTS AND EXEMPTIONS 








FY2007 


FY2007 


FY2008 


FY2008 


FY2009 


FY2009 


ANNUAL EXEMPTIONS 


NUMBER 


AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


AMOUNT 


WIDOWS 




15 


4,466 


10 


$2,735 


6 


$1,925 


VETERANS 




129 


103,199 


121 


$98,857 


118 


$101,826 


BLIND 




26 


22,724 


22 


$18,482 


22 


$18,824 


SENIORS 




41 


63,401 


42 


$66,009 


41 


$68,882 


DEFERRALS 




9 


25,624 


9 


$25,492 


11 


$29,940 


HARDSHIPS 




I 


1,000 


1 


$1,000 


1 


$796 




TOTALS 


221 


$220,414 


205 


$212,575 


199 


$222,193 






FY2007 


FY2007 


FY2008 


FY2008 


FY2009 


FY2009 


ANNUAL ABATEMENTS 


NUMBER 


TAX AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


TAX AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


TAX AMOUNT 


RESIDENTIAL 




56 


64,446 


62 


$73,752 


72 


$50,486 


SENIOR VOUCHER 




157 


105,975 


166 


$112,050 


192 


$129,600 


COMM/IND 




9 


204,391 


4 


$92,809 


4 


$48,467 


PERSONAL PROPERTY 


TOTALS 


4 
226 


2.145 
$376,957 


2 

234 


$2,987 
$281,598 


2 
270 


$7,200 


$235,753 



24 



FINANCE STATISTICS 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE BILLS 

32,100 
31,800 
31,500 
31,200 
30,900 
30,600 
30,300 
30,000 
29,700 
29,400 
29,100 

cncnoooooooooo 



31,914 ^^ 


31,767 




31,903^ 


/*31,673 31,763\ 31 ' 537 A / 


31,427 


^31,435 






\ / 31,153 


30,784 V-_ / 


30,700 \ / 








29,382 



PURCHASE ORDERS 



6,500 
6,000 
5,500 
5,000 
4,500 
4,000 
3,500 
3,000 



IT) 



i^3 



"Se- 
en 



- Ln 



o 



oocriOi-ifNin^rLny3i^oocri 

CTiCTiOOOOOOOOOO 



$1,600, 

$1,400, 

$1,200, 

$1,000, 

$800, 

$600, 

$400, 



$200,000 



INVESTMENT INCOME 



$1,800,000 



000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 



J=L 



(O Ol o 

as os o o 



co as 
o o 



UU^UU^U 



TOWN WEBSITE VISITS 
(Mthly. Avg.) 




25 



TOWN CLERK 

The mission of the Town Clerk's Office is to uphold the integrity of the Town's 
democratic process, to maintain and preserve public records, and to act in the best interest of the 
community and the State by providing innovative, efficient, quality service. 



The Town Clerk's office coordinated two elections, an Annual Town Meeting and two 
Special Town Meetings in 2009. On December 8, 2009, a State Primary was held to replace the 
Congressional Senate seat vacated by the death of Senator Edward M. Kennedy. 

The Town's vital records have been scanned back to 1986. Vital records are now issued 
these records through a scanning program that continues to provide great efficiencies in servicing 
the public. 

Volunteers are a great resource in the office. They work hundreds of hours assisting with 
the Town Census, inventorying records in the permanent vault, election duties and other duties 
where needed. Jerry and Sallie LaBarre, Arlene and Tony Sofia, Polly Robichaud and Charlotte 
Taylor have been volunteering for many years and are to be commended for the valuable 
services they provide to the Office and the Town. 

In 2009, the Office spent a considerable amount of time educating Andover residents 
about the importance of completing and returning the 2010 Federal Census. A collaboration 
with the League of Women was initiated and an ongoing theme entitled, "Together Andover 
Counts" was developed during the Fall. A group was formed to develop a plan for the Town that 
includes outreach to the Schools, press releases, flyers and a TV program in conjunction with 
Town of North Andover and State Representative Barbara L'ltalien. 

Following the completion of 1990 Federal Census, the Town's official census numbers 
were 29,151. The 2000 Federal Census showed the official census numbers at 31,247 - a 9% 
increase over ten years. Since the Federal Census numbers are used in all Federal and State 
formulas for dispersing grant monies and funds over a ten-year period, it is important that 
Andover residents return their census form so that the Town has the best count possible in 2010. 

DEPARTMENT STATISTICS: 

TOWN CENSUS 

In January, the Town Census was mailed to 12,532 households. The Town's population 
at the completion of the Census was 31,361. 

VOTER REGISTRATION/ELECTION TURNOUT 

The year ended with 20,505 active registered voters in nine precincts as follows: 



26 



Precinct 1-2,171 


Precinct 2 - 2,222 


Precinct 3 


-2,359 


Precinct 4 -2,168 


Precinct 5 - 2,303 


Precinct 6 


-2,237 


Precinct 7-2,321 


Precinct 8 - 2,394 


Precinct 9 


-2,330 


Election 




Date 


No. Voted 


[ % of Voters 


Town Election 




March 24 th 


3,153 


15% 


Special State Primary Election 


December 8 th 


4,621 


21% 


Annual Town Meeting 




May 26, 27 & 28 


^ 1,089* 


5% 


Special Town Meeting 




August 31 st 


749 


3% 


Special Town Meeting 




October 7 th 


768 
* first nig] 


4% 
tit's attendance 


RECORDINGS 




2007 


2008 


2009 


Births Recorded 




321 


249 


257 


Marriages Recorded 




114 


113 


116 


Deaths Recorded 




279 


290 


274 


Dog Licenses Sold 




2,365 


2,493 


2,580 


Fishing and Hunting Licenses Sold 




300 


300 


248 


Business Certificates 




125 


99 


95 


New Voter Registrations 




1,320 


1,735 


927 


Passport Applications 




868 


541 


613 


REVENUES 




2007 


2008 


2009 


Marriage Licenses 




2,920.00 


2,900.00 


2,950.00 


Certified Copies 




21,709.00 


21,249.00 


21,590.00 


Miscellaneous Licenses Income 




12,620.00 


14,285.00 


13,355.00 


Liquor Licenses Income 




100,790.00 


111,570.00 


97,450.00 


Business Certificate Filings 




5,720.00 


5,245.00 


4,549.00 


Miscellaneous Income 




3,062.00 


1,901.00 


1,031.00 


Passport Fees 




26,040.00 


13,960.00 


15,325.00 


Dog Licenses 




31,838.00 


38,968.00 


39,979.00 


Non Criminal Violations 




5,400.00 


8,150.00 


3,340.00 


Copy of Public Records 




270.00 


167.00 


250.00 


Fishing and Hunting Licenses 




6,814.25* 


6,746.25** 


6,592.00*** 


TOTAL 


$217,183.25 


$225,141.25 : 


206.411.00 



** 



•k & je 



$6,492.25 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife - $322.00 was 

retained by the Town. 

$6,417.25 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife - $329.00 was 

retained by the Town. 

$6,271 .50 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife - $320.65 was 

retained by the Town. 



27 



TOWN CLERK STATISTICS 



$250,000 
$225,000 
$200,000 
$175,000 
$150,000 
$125,000 
$100,000 
$75,000 
$50,000 



FEE REVENUES 




^>>vvv^v^<^v 



BUSINESS CERTIFICATES 




^^^^v^vvv^vv 



DOG LICENSES 




<^vvvvv>>vv ^V 



VITAL RECORDS & PASSPORTS 



4,000 
3,500 
3,000 
2,500 
2,000 
1,500 
1,000 
500 - 



rsi oo 
«i O 



% 5 






t, zt 



H5 



^v>>>>>>>>>>^ 



D Vitals 



D Passports 



28 



TOWN COUNSEL 



During 2009, Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and 
Administrative Boards. Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town officials. 
Court challenges to decisions by the Town's boards and commissions were defended by Town 
Counsel. 

Town Counsel had conferences with the Town Manager and other Town officials 
on almost a daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed all warrant articles, drafted many of them, and 
attended all Town Meetings. Advice was given to Town officials and to Town Meeting on the 
legal basis for warrant articles. Town Counsel attended meetings of various Town Boards and 
Commissions which held hearings on various requests from applicants. During the period 
covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed and numerous deeds, easements, 
releases and agreements were drafted and recorded. Various deed restrictions and regulatory 
agreements were reviewed for affordable housing and comprehensive permit projects. 

Intermunicipal Agreements with Tewksbury and Lawrence were drafted to allow 
Andover property owners to connect to the sewer systems in those municipalities. 

Advice was rendered to Town employees and officials regarding the new State Conflict 
of Interest Law and Open Meeting Law. 

Consultation occurred with the Department of Revenue and Office of the Inspector 
General on a regular basis regarding financial transactions and procurement practices. 

Revisions to the Planning Board Subdivision Rules and Regulations were drafted. 

Consultation occurred with the Massachusetts School Building Assistance Bureau 
regarding contracts for the feasibility of a new school to replace the Bancroft School. 



29 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Police Department is to protect our future and the quality of 
life in Andover. We are empowered to protect life and property, but, with the changing times of 
increasing social programs, our agency has become more service-oriented to the community. To 
continue our mission, we all maintain an open door policy to the community, working with their 
suggestions, needs and thoughts so that we may preserve the way of life that we all enjoy in 
Andover. 



The Andover Police Department is committed to providing the highest level of public 
safety and service to the citizens and business people within the community. The members of the 
Department are empowered to enforce the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the 
Bylaws of the Town of Andover, to ensure that the peace and tranquility of our neighborhoods 
are maintained and that crime and the fear of crime are reduced. The Department emphasizes" 
integrity, honesty, impartiality and professionalism from its members creating an environment 
that values differences and fosters fairness and flexibility in our mission. The Department 
encourages citizen input and interaction that will assist in developing sound partnerships between 
the community and the Police. Working together will protect our future and enhance the quality 
of life for everyone within the Town. 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 

The Department handled 34,876 incidents in 2009 - a 1% decrease from 2008. There 
were 536 arrests( 25% decrease), 381 larcenies (22% decrease) and 75 burglaries (23% increase). 
The Department also responded to 51 calls of domestic abuse - an 82% increase over last year. 

The Department issued 6,433 motor vehicle citations during the year which is a 23% 
decrease from 2008. There were 903 motor vehicle accidents handled by the Department (no 
change from last year). 

The Police Department continued to work closely with other Town departments, agencies 
and the community throughout the year. The Sub-Station, located on Grandview Terrace, was 
closed for budgetary reasons, however, the Department continued its partnership with the 
residents at the Andover Housing Authority and the Youth Services Department through the 
New Horizons for Youth Program which is now funded through the Department. 

The Department continues to have great success with a School Resource Officer assigned 
to the Greater Lawrence Technical High School. Funding for this position is provided by the 
Technical School. 

The Department also participated in numerous events including the Holiday and 
Memorial Day Parades, the Fourth of July celebrations, Safety Saturday, Andover Days, the 
Feaster Five Road Race on Thanksgiving Day as well as numerous other road races held 
throughout the year. 



30 



RECORDS DIVISION 

The Records Division provides support services to the entire Police Department. This 
service enables information to flow efficiently throughout the Department as well as to the entire 
community. 

The Police Department received more than $130,408.00 in new grant money during 
2009. These grants allow the Department to serve the community by providing funding for 
personnel and other resources. Equipment grants allowed the Department to provide car safety 
seats and bicycle helmets to those who would otherwise not be able to afford such safety items. 
Emergency equipment such as shelters, body armor, gas masks, defibrillators and other 
emergency communication equipment were also purchased with this grant money. Highway 
Safety grants allowed for extra patrols, participation in several MSP Sobriety Checkpoints and 
enforcement around high accident locations. E911 grants allowed us to train and certify all 
dispatchers in Emergency Medical Dispatching. 

The Court Section processed a total of 536 arrests and 778 summonses. This included 
tracking all Police Department cases from inception to disposition and coordinating officers' 
appearances in court. In addition, this section assists in tracking District Court cases for other 
Town Departments such as the Health Division, Building Division, etc. 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 

The Detective Division is responsible for the follow-up of investigations conducted by 
the agency. The Detective Division also oversees the Substance Abuse Unit. This Unit was 
created in response to the community's request for the Police Department to take a more active 
role in combating drugs and alcohol in the Town. The Division also has one investigator 
assigned as a Juvenile Officer. He works closely with the schools and courts in processing 
Juvenile cases. 

The Detective Division continued to be actively involved in follow-up investigations 
throughout the year. The Division was instrumental in solving and identifying the perpetrators 
of numerous serious crimes as well as following the cases through the judicial system. 

The Detective Division followed up and investigated 75 burglaries and 381 larcenies. 

The Division also investigates incidents on the Internet. They recognize this new aspect 
of Internet crime as a major problem to our community and caution all parents and residents of 
the Town to be vigilant in combating this increasing problem. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

The Animal Control Officer answered 732 calls for service in 2009. He responded to 291 
dog complaints and impounded 51 dogs and 1 cat. He also removed 220 deceased animals. In 
addition to these removed animals, there were 48 deer struck and killed by motor vehicles in 
Town. 



31 



EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

The Town's Emergency Management is directed by the Chief of Police and serves as the 
local link to the Federal and State Emergency Management Agencies (FEMA/MEMA), the 
Department of Homeland Security and the FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force. It also includes a 
network of HAM radio operators that are on standby should the need arise for auxiliary radio 
services. A Citizen Emergency Response Team (CERT) has also been established and is 
providing residents with training and equipment that will allow them to be better prepared in 
times of crisis. 

The Chief of Police is also the Town's Liaison with the Regional Local Emergency 
Planning Committee (LEPC) and is responsible for coordinating the Town's response to any 
hazardous materials incident. 

The Chief of Police is the current Chairman of the Commonwealth's Northeast Homeland 
Security Regional Advisory Council (NERAC). 

The Auxiliary Police assisted the regular officers of the Police Department many times 
throughout the year. They are particularly active during the holidays and on Halloween. They 
are a very dedicated group of volunteers and the Town is fortunate to have their services as a 
resource. 



32 



POLICE STATISTICS 



900 
800 
700 
600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 



ARRESTS 



38- 



56 



21 



38 



-39- 



35 31 



37 31 



i- .- * 



22 



cnoioooooooooo 



I Juvenile 



□ Adult 



ASSAULTS 




00 


CTi 


O 


1—1 


rsi 


ro 


m- 


m 


vO 


IV 


CTi 


CT> 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


fc 


fc 


fc 


fc 


t 


fc 


fc 


fc 


fc 


fc 



oo en 
o o 



500 

450 

400 

350 

300 4 

250 



LARCENY 

490 487 



465 



200 



"424" 



332_ 



458 



422 



38 4 



346 



353 



343 



-384 



ooaiOi-irviro'st-uiiorvcoa^ 

CTvOIOOOOOOOOOO 



BREAKING & ENTERING 



100 
90 
80 
70 
60 
50 

40 -I 
30 



95 



83 



71 



^5- 



69 



60 



64 



51 



48 



60 61 61 



OOCTiO-^HrvjnTLDlOrvODCTi 
CTiCTiOOOOOOOOOO 



J 



33 



POLICE STATISTICS 



70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 




STOLEN VEHICLES & BICYCLES 



\ 69 




V44 


V*^<f^ ^ 29 


.._ 22 


19 .^>24 \i 8 ^ 22 /\19 


— lT 


"*' 17 \JXl< 7 N. 


10 9 -£»—■—»" 11 



fc-fcfc.fcfcfcfcfcfc'fcfcfc 



-♦ — Motor Vehicles 



Bicycles 



DOMESTIC ABUSE 




00 cr> 
o o 



PARKING VIOLATIONS 



14,000 

13,000 

12,000 

11,000 

10,000 

9,000 

8,000 

7,000 

6,000 



13,800 It 




13,749 


/ \ 11,949 / \ 




l,125/Ti,374 


V 11,249 




♦ 10.224 


10,598 >, 


/ 9,624 \ 


/ 8,774 




8,373 \ 




♦ 6,524 



ooo^Or-irNro'j-Lnior^coai 
oicnoooooooooo 



VANDALISM 



360 
340 
320 
300 
280 
260 
240 
220 
200 
180 
160 
140 
120 
100 













301 


















237 


236 




.- 








216 214 217 




192 188 


! 
























■ 


1 


8 


5 


• 






152 150 154 








— 


1 




: '- 



oocriOT-irMn^rLnvDrvcocrv 

CTiOiOOOOOOOOOO 

^ tt tt t ^ ^ ti 



34 



FIRE RESCUE 



The mission of Andover Fire Rescue is to serve the citizens of the community and its 
visitors by protecting them from the dangers created by man-made and natural emergencies. 

Andover Fire Rescue provides professional services such as fire suppression, EMS, 
technical rescue, and hazardous materials response. The organization aggressively attempts to 
minimize the risks associated with these incidents through effective fire prevention and 
investigation, code enforcement, public education and injury prevention programs. The 
Department is dedicated to assisting those in need regardless of the severity of the problem. 

Value Statement 

The values of Andover Fire Rescue are service to those in need and community 
involvement through the professionalism, integrity, and dedication of its personnel. 

Fire Rescue and EMS Operations 

There are two basic sub-divisions within the Operations Division of Andover Fire Rescue 
- Fire Rescue and Emergency Medical Services. 

The Operations Division operates on four shifts led by a Deputy Fire Chief who is 
responsible for the oversight of all activities on a particular shift. Those responsibilities range 
from incident response and training, ensuring there is adequate personnel coverage and 
appropriately protecting the community on a given day. 

The Operations Division has primary responsibility for responding to emergency and 
urgent calls for help from the public. Services provided include combating all types of fires, 
providing emergency medical care to the sick and injured, containing and mitigating the effects 
of leaks and spills of hazardous materials, rescuing those who are physically trapped in such 
situations as motor vehicle accidents, industrial accidents or collapsed structures, rescuing 
persons caught in swift moving water, mitigating the hazards associated from downed power 
lines or natural gas leaks and providing aid in situations where those in the community need 
special assistance such as lock out/in situations, or animal rescues. 

In addition, all of the men and women of Andover Fire Rescue participate in presenting 
public fire safety and emergency preparedness educational programs, safety inspections, 
maintaining equipment, apparatus and facilities and continuous training. 

Andover Fire Rescue operates out of three fire stations with three EMT Engine 
Companies, one EMT Ladder Company and two Basic Life Support (BLS) ambulances 
providing 24/7 coverage. The fire stations are located on North Main Street, Greenwood Road 
and at the intersection of Clark Road and Andover Street. 



35 



Several specialized pieces of equipment (such as boats and a trench rescue trailer) are 
located throughout the community and staffed on an "as needed" basis by personnel normally 
assigned to the engine companies. 

Andover Fire Rescue has one reserve engine, one reserve ladder and two reserve 
ambulances among its fleet. The reason for the reserve apparatus is to ensure that the Town is 
appropriately protected when a "front line" truck is out of service for repairs or preventative 
maintenance and to maintain the Insurance Services Office (ISO) Class 3 rating. 

The Department is comprised of 68 personnel including four Deputy Chiefs, twelve 
Lieutenants and forty-eight firefighters. Suppression personnel work a 24-hour schedule with 
one of the four groups on-duty each day. 

One of the Deputy Chiefs serves as the Training Officer for Andover Fire Rescue and has 
the responsibility of coordinating and/or delivering all training-related programs in relation to the 
myriad of services provided by the Fire Rescue personnel. It ranges from the review of initial 
training that newly hired recruits receive while attending the Massachusetts Firefighting 
Academy, specialized rescue training recertification or continuing education and training to the 
entire organization. 

The delivery of Emergency Medical Services training is provided by Paramedic and EMT 
certified personnel from outside agencies or from within the organization. Extensive Federal and 
State regulations relative to the provision of emergency medical services and the appropriate 
documentation and administrative requirements, necessitate special focus and attention. 

Fire Rescue and EMS Resources 

Andover Fire Rescue has three fire stations - each has one or more staffed companies as well 
as specialized and/or reserve equipment. 

Station 1 , Central Station - 32 North Main Street (downtown area) 

~ Staffed companies: Engine company, ladder company, ambulance, Deputy Chief 

~ Specialized apparatus: 2 rescue boats, trench rescue trainer and air support 

vehicle. 
~ Reserve apparatus: engine, ladder truck 2 ambulances 

Station 2, Ballardvale Station - Clark Road and Andover Street 
~ Staffed company: Engine company 
~ Specialized apparatus: 1 Rescue boat 

Station 3, West Station - Greenwood Road (West Andover area) 

~ Staffed companies: Engine company, ambulance 

~ Specialized apparatus: 2 rescue boats, fire alarm bucket truck 

Each of the four platoons consists of seventeen (17) positions, with a minimum daily 
staffing level of 16 Firefighter/EMT's and Command staff. 



36 



Command Staff: One Deputy Chief 

■ Engine Companies: One Lieutenant, one driver/operator and one firefighter 
Ladder Company: One drive/operator and one firefighter 

■ Ambulance: Two Emergency Medical Technicians 

Andover Fire Rescue currently has Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) with 
several communities to provide mutual aid, automatic mutual aid and other response needs in the 
event that the on-duty resources are overwhelmed by an incident. These agreements contain the 
provision of service by Andover Fire Rescue to other communities in return for service to the 
community of Andover. 

Fire Prevention 

The following five primary objectives measure the success of the work done by the Fire 
Prevention Office: 

Reduce fire loss and injuries through the administration of risk-based community 
education programs. 

Manage risk associated with fire and environmental emergencies through 
successful implementation to engineering, inspection, code compliance and 
hazardous materials management. 

■ Ensure citizens can escape a fire safely, that suppression forces have the means to 
control a fire with minimal risk of injury and that damages to physical resources 
area minimized in an emergency through proactive prevention efforts in new and 
existing buildings. 

Investigate fire and hazardous materials incidents to understand causes and effects 
and apply lessons learned to improving our community's safety programs. 

■ Ensure that the Office is meeting the service demands of the community and 
providing excellent customer service. We strive to meet the interests of the Fire 
Prevention responsibility while attempting to meet the interests of the residents. 

The Fire Prevention Officer also supports the Incident Commander at all escalating fire 
and rescue incidents by fulfilling the staff function of Safety Officer. The Fire Prevention 
Officer responds directly to the scene to coordinate and address any safety and personnel 
accountability concerns that may arise during the mitigation of the incident. 

The Department annually inspects three or more family dwellings, schools, theaters and 
all public, municipal, commercial and industrial occupancies. All nursing homes, rest homes, 
hospitals infirmaries and innholders are inspected on a quarterly basis. Fire drills are conducted 
at each public and private school quarterly and public sector training is conducted per their 
request. Facilities requiring assistance in developing evacuation plans are also afforded the 
guidance necessary in preparing the plans. All necessary State and Local permits for storage of 
flammables, installation of oil burners, fireworks and pyrotechnic displays, storage of gunpowder 
or blasting agents and the daily blasting or open burning permits are issued by Fire Rescue. 



37 



Fire Investigation 

Andover Fire Rescue is responsible for conducting fire scene investigations to determine 
origin and cause. Fire Rescue has a Deputy Fire Chief who is specially trained in performing fire 
and arson investigations to determine whether the fire was accidental or arson in nature. Fire 
Investigators thoroughly examine fire scenes, interview victims, witnesses and potential 
suspects. The investigators are also responsible for collecting evidence and processing the 
evidence to determine the cause of the fire. 

Andover Fire Rescue has a Deputy Chief who teams up with members of the Police 
Department, Massachusetts Fire Marshall's Office, Massachusetts State Police and the Essex 
County District Attorneys Office in the prosecution of arson cases. All entities involved are 
required to prepare detailed reports, present evidence and testify in Court for fire cause cases. 

Fire Protection 

Andover Fire Rescue provides services ranging from the education of elementary school 
children to the rescue of elderly citizens from nursing home fires. Installation and maintenance 
of all fire alarm wiring of all coded fire alarm boxes is also provided. 

Specialized Rescues 

In addition to fire and emergency medical services, the Department performs numerous 
rescue missions. These include incidents involving stalled elevators, trench collapse rescue, 
confined spaces, high/low angle rope rescues, surface water and ice rescues. 

Hazardous Materials Response 

The Department, in cooperation with the District Hazardous Materials Team, mitigates 
all hazardous materials incidents. The District 6 Team is comprised of members of various 
departments from Billerica to Gloucester. Andover Fire Rescue maintains records of any and all 
buildings that store hazardous materials over the threshold amounts established by the 
Environmental Protection Agency. These records are required to be resubmitted to the 
Department on an annual basis prior to March 31 st . 

Emergency Medical Services 

Andover Fire Rescue provides first response to all medical emergencies due to accidents 
or medical ailments. The surrounding communities of North Andover, Tewksbury, North 
Reading, Reading, Billerica, Methuen and Salem, NH provide back up mutual aid ambulance 
service. In addition, the Lawrence General Hospital Paramedic Unit is requested when the 
emergency dictates the need for Advanced Life Support (ALS) based on stringent protocols 
established through collaboration between Andover Fire and Lawrence General Hospital. 
Andover' s ambulance service has recently upgraded its license from a Basic Life Support status 
to an Enhanced Life Support status as the result of placing Automatic External Defibrillators on 
all of its emergency vehicles. 



38 



FIRE STATISTICS 



1200 
1100 
1000 
900 
800 
700 
600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 



FIRE CALLS 



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3 



$ 



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AMBULANCE TRANSPORTS 




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I MUTUAL DANDOVER 



PERMITS & LICENSES ISSUED 



1,600 -S- 






1,400 
1,200 ~ 
1,000 

800 

600 

400 

200 



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100 



MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS 




oocTio^HrNim^rLri^oi^cocTi 

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0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0: 



39 



PLANT & FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Plant & Facilities Department is to provide a responsive, well planned 
and cost effective maintenance operation and capital improvement program for all Town and 
School buildings, parks and grounds, vehicle maintenance, cemetery, forestry and other areas 
within their responsibility. 

The Plant & Facilities Department provides scheduled and non-routine maintenance 
services to all Town and School buildings (over 1.35 million square feet), parks and grounds, 
cemetery, forestry and vehicle operations. Additionally, the Department is responsible for the 
following: 

Implementation of all major buildings and grounds capital projects including new building 

construction projects, landscape and field projects and driveway and parking areas. 

Town and School building and field rental functions. 

The Town's fuel depot. 

Spring Grove Cemetery operations. 

Compliance with environmental, health and safety regulations. 

Custodial services to all Town buildings. 

Town-owned traffic and streetlights. 

Building security. 

Bald Hill leaf composting facility. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Department is managed by a Director who is supported by four Superintendents, an 
Executive Secretary, a Construction Project Manager, a Work Control Center Coordinator, two 
part-time Accounts Payable Clerks, a Business Manager, a Facilities Services Supervisor and a 
diverse group of skilled and semi-skilled Maintenance Tradespersons, Vehicle Mechanics, 
Custodians and Grounds and Tree Workers. 

ADMINISTRATION ACCOMPLISHMENTS/HIGHLIGHTS 

Completed the installation of 132,546 s.f. of new roofing at Doherty Middle School, 

West Elementary School, West Fire Station and the radio building at Holmes Road. 

Plant & Facilities Director approved by Massachusetts School Building Authority as the 

designated Owner's Project Manager for the new Bancroft School project. 

Over 100 Summer and Fall projects completed at multiple Town and School Buildings 

and sites. 

Implemented the Bald Hill Compost Site Permit Program: 

~ Revenue of $ 1 2,750 in Permit Sales 

~ Revenue of $6,000 from Sale of Compost 

~ The above $ 1 8,750 revenue used to offset operating costs of $49,500 (not 
including in-house labor) 

~ Increased security measures, including new fencing, which resulted in a reduction 
in illegal dumping 



40 



Energy Conservation/Cost Avoidance: 

~ Completed the installation of energy efficient lighting at the Memorial Hall 
Library, West Middle School and Andover High School. Received 40% of funds 
through NGRID grant. Estimated annual savings of $107,000 from these projects. 
~ Applied for Green Community status with the Mass. Department of Energy 
Resources Green Communities Division. Thirteen Town and School buildings 
have been audited, which will allow the Town to apply for energy project grant 
funds as soon as they become available. 
~ Installed C02 sensors in selected areas of Andover High School and the Public 
Safety Center to regulate ventilation rates and save energy. 
Other Major Capital Projects completed include: 

~ Major Electrical Distribution System upgrade at West Middle School Completed. 
~ Structural repairs at Bancroft Elementary School. 
~ Installed two new Dual Fuel Boilers at West Middle School. 
Tree City USA designation for the 1 0th consecutive year by the National Arbor Day 
Foundation. 

Wood Park Project - Wood Memorial and South Main Street fence restoration and other 
improvements completed. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISIONS 

The Building Maintenance and Mechanical/Electrical Divisions are supervised by two 
Superintendents and provide all maintenance services including electrical, mechanical, 
plumbing, carpentry, painting and security to all Town and School buildings. The two 
Superintendents also function as Project Managers on a variety of Town/School capital 
improvement projects. Additionally, these divisions provide mail delivery to all buildings and 
maintain traffic signals and Town-owned street light poles. 

2007 2008 2009 

School Labor Hours 23,011 20,107 20,457 

School - Total Labor & Material Cost $1,092,701 $978,951 $1,129,900 

Town Labor Hours 9,358 10,023 7,309 

Town - Total Labor & Material Costs $544,508 $767,080 $687,817 

Capital Projects: School -$3,054,433 Town -$810,504 (Articles) 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MEQiAMCAITELECTRICAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

BANCROFT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
■ . Additional Structural Repairs 

Bancroft School Replacement - Architect selected, Feasibility Study in process. 

DOHERTY MIDDLE SCHOOL * 
Roof Replacement 

Andover Memorial Building Entrance 
Andover Memorial Building Renovations-Designer Selection Process 

41 



Basement Corridor (near Copy Center) - Structural Repairs - In process 

Paint Cafeteria Ceiling 

Solar Panel Project - In process 

Replace two Baseball Field backstops (90' and softball diamonds) 

HIGH PLAIN ELEMENTARY/WOOD HILL MIDDLE SCHOOLS 

Roof Warranty Problems - Engineering Study Completed - Legal process initiated 
New Security System 
-. New CCTV Camera System - In process 

ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL/COLLINS CENTER 
Site Drainage Problems/ Corrective Actions 
Upgrade Unit Ventilation Controls (ten classrooms) 
New Energy Efficient Lighting 
Painting eight rooms 

SANBORN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
Exterior Painting Soffits & Fascia 

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 

■ Replace Roof Top HVAC Units 

I.T. Main Computer Room Waterproofing Project 
Re-carpet Business Office 

SHAWSHEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
Slate Roof Repairs 
Exterior Masonry Repairs 

■ Add A/C to the ABA classroom 

Replaced leaking pipes in Boys Restroom and re-finished walls 

SOUTH ELEMENTARY 

Resurface Gym Floor 
Replace Eight Air Inlet Grilles 
Replaced Leaking Boiler Sections 

WEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

61,500 s.f. of New Roofing installed 

Exterior Roof Drain Connection to Underground Drainage in Courtyard 

Ceiling/Lighting Support Systems Structural Problems - Emergency Corrective Work - 

Completed in large portions of the building - Legal Action in Process 

Installed new piping to four classroom sinks. 

WEST MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Installed Two New Dual Fuel Boilers 

Installed New Energy Efficient Lighting throughout. Estimated Annual Savings-$ 17,000. 
Renovation work completed to support new Special Needs/Life Skills Room 
Handicap modifications completed to Boys Restroom. 



42 



ALL SCHOOLS 

Fire Alarm System Testing and Maintenance 
AHERA (bi-annual asbestos) Inspections 
Screened and Recoated all Gymnasium Floors 

TOWN PROJECTS 

BALD HILL STICKER FEE PROGRAM 
Implemented on September 1, 2009 
$12,750 in Revenue from Permit Sales in 2009 
$6,000 in Revenue from Sale of Compost in 2009 

BLANCHARD STREET 

Schematic Design - Completed 
Two neighborhood meetings held 

COMPUTERIZED MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (CMM) 

Completed transition from existing CMM Program to new online system. Vehicle 
Maintenance portion in process. 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Slate Roof Replacement - Bid Awarded, scheduled for Spring 201 0. 
■ Replace Second Floor Windows - Bid Awarded, scheduled for Spring 2010. 
New Energy Efficient Lighting 
Installed new carpeting in ground floor offices 

PEARSON STREET PROPERTIES 

Support to Temporary Youth Center Building 

PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING 

Exterior Masonry Corrective Work 

SENIOR CENTER 

New Four Season Room 

New Handicap Sensory Garden 

TOWN HOUSE 

Kitchen Area Upgrades 
Updated Elevator Controls 

TOWN OFFICES 

- Replace HVAC Rooftop Units - Punch list and Controls Completed 
Major Roof Repairs to Parapet 

TOWN YARD/RED SPRING ROAD 

• New Town Yard Study - RFP to Acquire New Site Issued. 
Major Town Yard Structural Repairs 



43 



TOWN WIDE - WORK 

Town/School NGRID Energy Initiative - Four Town/School Buildings Surveyed 
Town/School Massachusetts State Department of Energy Resources Energy Study 

WOOD PARK PROJECT 

Construction and renovation work completed which included a new Memorial honoring 
William F. Wood, tree removals and replantings along North Main Street, restoration of 
the Historic Fence and a New Concrete Sign. 



ROOFING WORK - TOWN WIDE 

Doherty School 

West Elementary School 

West Fire Station 

Holmes Road Radio Building 

Memorial Hall Library - Spring 2010 

Water Treatment Plant - Spring 2010 

Rec Park- Spring 2010 

Pomps Pond - Spring 2010 



ENERGY CONSERVATION 

West Middle School Energy Efficient Lighting 

C02 Control Program - Ten Classrooms at AHS, also Public Safety Building 

Doherty Middle School Lighting Survey - In process 

Sanborn School - Lighting planned for FY201 1 

South School - Lighting planned for FY201 1 

Doherty Middle School & West Elementary Schools - New Roofing 

West Middle School - Two New Dual Fuel Boilers 

Town/School DOER Energy Study 





Electric Usage 


per Sqi 


iare Foot (kwh) 




SCHOOLS 










% Change 




2005 


2006 


2008 


2009 


2005-2009 


West elem 


5.93 


5.965 


5.27 


5.378 


(9.3) 


Sanborn 


5.069 


4.889 


4.495 


4.322 


(14.7) 


West Middle 


3.953 


4.06 


3.69 


3.172 


(19.8) 


Shawsheen 


3.774 


3.304 


3.279 


3.056 


(19.0) 


Bancroft 


7.758 


7.653 


6 


6.098 


(21.4) 


Doherty 


5.027 


5.091 


4.698 


4.638 


(7.7) 


South 


5.96 


5.781 


4.999 


5.089 


(14.6) 


HP/WH 


7.116 


6.528 


6.038 


5.978 


(16.0) 


Andover High 


7.067 


6.662 


6.429 


5.43 


(23.2) 



44 



Electricity and Gas Usage 2005-2009 per Square Foot kwh and therms 



TOWN 












% Change 




2005 


2006 


2007 


2008 


2009 


2005-2009 


Electricity (kwh) 














Town Offices 


12.38 


12.66 


12.59 


11.6 


11.11 


(10.3) 


Library 






13.15 


12.36 


11.49 


(12.6) 


Public Safety Center 




19.08 


17.57 


17.44 


16.61 


(5.5) 


Natural Gas (therms) 






'! 








Town Offices 


0.452 


0.361 


0.357 


0.343 


0.35 


(2.5) 


Library 


0.482 


0.432 


0.368 


0.339 


0.35 


(4.6) 


Public Safety Center 




1.39 


1.238 


1.217 


1.13 


(8.7) 



PARKS & GROUNDS, CEMETERY and FORESTRY DIVISIONS 

The three Parks & Grounds Divisions (Parks & Grounds, Cemetery and Forestry) are 
independent and interdependent. They operate under the supervision of one Superintendent and 
share some equipment and work together on special projects. The three divisions perform many 
tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal horticultural maintenance duties, such as providing 
support to parades and other holiday events, litter control, trash removal, recycling, flagpole 
maintenance, fence/gate/backstop repairs, drainage projects, snow removal and repairing park 
benches and tables. 

PARKS & GROUNDS, FORESTRY AND CEMETERY STATISTICS 



Man Hours 
Labor & Materials 



Schools 

6,265 

$180,244 



Town 

21,462 

$742,769 



Fields Revolving Fund Projects 
PARKS & GROUNDS DIVISION 



$21,465 



$6,385 Total $27,850 



This division maintains over 2.75 million square feet of ball fields and 1.4 million square 
feet of lawn areas. Ball fields and lawns are located on all School and Town building sites and 
other Town properties including Ballardvale Playground, Upper and Lower Shawsheen, the 
Bowling Green, Town-owned parks, playgrounds and designated islands, triangles and other 
parcels throughout the Town. Ball fields are prepared (groomed and lined) for all secondary 
school athletic events. Turf maintenance consists of mowing, aerating, watering, over-seeding, 
liming, fertilizing and weed and insect control. This division also maintains small trees, shrubs 
and shrub beds on Town property and is responsible for snow removal at all Town buildings. 



45 



CEMETERY DIVISION 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by the Town, contains 
approximately sixty acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 2009, there were 46 full 
burials, 24 cremations and 61 gravesites sold for total revenue of $63,308. Cemetery operations 
and maintenance includes burials, mowing, trimming, turf care, pruning of shrubs and small 
trees, leaf pickup, Town- wide snow removal and other tasks including grounds maintenance and 
special projects at other Town facilities. 

FORESTRY DIVISION 

The Forestry Division is responsible for the maintenance of all Town-owned trees. Forestry 
Division work includes: pruning trees, clearing storm damage, flat clearing areas of undesirable 
vegetation and removing obstructions at intersections and curves for improved visibility. The 
Forestry Division also performs roadside mowing throughout the Town, maintains the Bald Hill 
compost site and plows snow for the Department of Public Works. 

PARKS & GROUNDS, CEMETERY and FORESTRY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

South School Fields - Aerated and seeded all three fields twice during growing season, 

removed old anchored existing football goal posts. 

Upper Shawsheen Field - Aerated three times during season, over-seeded field, additionl 

fertilization and weed control (field was out of play from April 1 , 2009 until September 

1, 2009 as part of Town- wide rotating field resting program). 

Lower Shawsheen Field - Aerated and seeded field three times during growing season. 

Sodded worn goal mouth areas (2,000 s.f. of sod) in mid- August for Fall soccer. 

Wood Hill and High Plain Fields - Aerated and seeded three times during growing 

season. 

Applied Diamond Mix to all School and Town baseball diamonds. 

Irrigation systems maintenance - Performed Spring and Fall maintenance to all Town and 

School systems. 

Fertilizer applications - Town and School fields. 

Completed reconstruction of High School varsity baseball infield (drainage, new 

irrigation, grading, new sod and new diamond mix). 

Removed and replaced backstop at the 90 foot baseball diamond at Doherty School. 

Removed and replaced backstop at adjacent softball field at Doherty School. 

Received Tree City U.S.A. designation from the National Arbor Day Foundation for the 

1 0th consecutive year. 

Removed twelve hazard trees on Cemetery property, continued pruning of low hanging 

limbs throughout the cemetery. 

Responded to 187 requests for tree work from Town residents. 

Responded to 1 6 emergency tree calls from the Andover Police Department. 

Planted 8 new public shade trees during the Spring. 

Bald Hill Recycling facility - Supervised Site Monitors and provided support to the 

composting operation, which produced 2,700 cubic yards of processed compost generated 

from grass clippings and leaves. 

Coordinated the installation of the holiday decorations on Main Street. 



46 



Celebrated Arbor Day on April 30, 2009 at the Andover Town Common by planting a 

2.5" Zelkova-Village Green in honor of Arbor Day. 

Forestry Division mowed roadside vegetation along 40 miles of Town roads. 

48 stumps ground out, chips removed, areas loamed and seeded. 

Removed 740 feet of existing blacktop from old road on cemetery grounds, prepared site 

for new blacktop. 

Repaired cracks along 1,200 linear feet of stone wall adjacent to Abbot Street. 

Continued weed eradication program throughout Cemetery Grounds. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The Vehicle Maintenance Division is supervised by a Superintendent, who is also 
responsible for purchasing and materials management for all Plant & Facilities operating 
divisions. This division provides maintenance to all Town vehicles and major pieces of 
equipment including fire apparatus, police cruisers, DPW trucks and heavy equipment, Plant & 
Facilities trucks and heavy equipment, Town/School emergency generators and other support 
vehicles. The Superintendent of the Vehicle Maintenance Division also coordinates the 
purchasing of all new Town vehicles. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Provided preventive maintenance and general repairs to 152 Town vehicles and 60 major 
pieces of equipment, emergency generators for 1 8 School and Town buildings and 56 
smaller pieces of equipment. 

Completed 827 work orders totaling 4,050 man hours and $496,769 in labor & materials. 
Provided administrative support to vehicle purchases for Town departments. 
Supported DPW snow removal operations, (Equipment maintenance and installation and 
removal of sander units). 
■ Maintained and repaired all fire apparatus, including assisting with federally-mandated 
inspections of the ladder trucks' hydraulic and pump systems. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE STATISTICS 

2007 2008 2009 

Gasoline 
Diesel 
Total Gallons 

FACILITIES SERVICES DIVISION 

The Facilities Services Division is managed by a Supervisor and is responsible for all 
Town custodial services, including support to the Library, Public Safety, Town House, Town 
Offices, and Senior Center. This division also schedules the use and rental of all School 
buildings, Town and School fields, and the Town House function hall for non-profit groups, 
private organizations, individuals, and Town and School activities. The Field House, Dunn 
Gymnasium, and fields at Andover High School and West Middle School are scheduled by the 
School Athletic Department. 



47 



86,915 


84,713 


85,648 


44,242 


45,763 


46,571 


131,157 


130,476 


132,219 



FACILITIES SERVICES ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Continued support to Town and School energy conservation initiatives. 

Continued program to improve custodial efficiency and cost savings with new labor 

saving equipment and cleaning products. 

Ongoing custodial training on methods and procedures. 

Coordinated meetings with leaders of all private youth sports and Town officials to 

support field maintenance, scheduled programs, and special projects. 

RENTAL ACTIVITY 

The rental numbers reflect the actual permits issued and entered into the accounting 
system. For every rental request received, a permit is issued and an invoice is generated. 

SCHOOLS 

School rentals continued to fill the ten schools in Town. Growth was seen in the 
Department of Community Services, Youth Services and School enrichment program uses. 
There continued to be a slight decline in School rental permits as a result of the energy 
conservation program implemented in 2005. In December, only two schools were available for 
use in the evening, down from four in the previous winter. All schools continued to be available 
for gym use only after 6:00PM and the open schools accommodate mostly Town and School 
programs from Thanksgiving to April vacation. Weekend use of schools is not permitted from 
the end of November until after April vacation. 

FIELDS 

Town fields were rented to capacity each season in 2009. The High School, Department 
of Community Services and Andover Youth Services programs continued to expand. All Youth 
and Adult Leagues were once again asked to maintain their programs at their current size, as 
there is no field space available for program expansion. 

ANDOVER TOWN HOUSE 

The function hall at the Andover Town House is available for rental seven days per week. 
In addition to various private rentals, the Department of Community Services is the most 
frequent weekday user, and also uses the hall for various evening and weekend events. Andover 
Youth Services regularly schedules concerts, dances, and other events at the Town House. The 
Andover Senior Center also hosts social events at the Town House each year. 



FACILITIES SERVICES STATISTICS 



Schools 

Town Buildings 

Fields 



2007 2008 2009 



592 


558 


594 


100 


70 


63 


85* 


64 


73 



Total Permits Issued 777 692 730 

* Decrease in field permits due to Recreation Park moving under Department of Community 
Services. 

48 



160 
140 
120 
100 



80 
60 
40 -j 
20 — 







PLANT AND FACILITIES STATISTICS 



TOWN BUILDING 
RENTAL PERMITS 

(Includes Town Hall & Sr. Ctr.) 



99 100 95 



100 



79 



59 



-?0- 



63 



FY02 FY03 FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 



SCHOOL BUILDING 
RENTAL PERMITS 



1,000 
900 
800 
700 
600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 




871 




r 








615 


581 592 55g 594 












485 






















318 



FY02 FY03 FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 



FIELD RENTAL PERMITS 

(Excludes Rec Park as of FY07) 



160 

140 

120 

100 

80 

60 

40 

20 





134 i« 


115 


L23 






















76 






85 


|_ 73 


— 
















64 









FY02 FY03 FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 



SALE OF GRAVE SITES 



120 

110 

100 

90 

80 

70 

60 

50 

40 

30 

20 

10 





m 














81 




66 








-- 






" 


56 56 




'•:- 








48 




44 















FY02 FY03 FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 



49 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The mission of the Department of Public Works is to continuously improve our quality of 
life by providing the finest potable water, state-of-the-art disposal of our wastes (liquid and 
solid) and provide safe travel on our road network. 

ENGINEERING DIVISION 

During 2009, the Engineering Division performed work for various construction projects 
such as: the completion of sewer construction on Kirkland Drive and drainage improvements on 
Greybirch Road, College Circle, Alderbrook Road and Spring Grove Road. This involved 
performing field surveys, designs, estimates, specifications, construction management and 
inspections. 

Bridge repairs and safety improvements were completed on Balmoral Street and repairs 
were started on Stevens Street. Also, preliminary design began on the Andover Street bridge 
deck replacement. Work involved meeting with consultant engineers and contractors, design 
review, construction management, field layout and inspections. 

Assistance was provided to the Highway Division for the resurfacing of twenty Town 
streets, various drainage, road and sidewalk repairs and to the Water/Sewer Division during 
water main or sewer main repairs and rehabilitations. 

The Engineering staff coordinated daily with the contractor, state engineers, residents and 
businesses during the completion of the Main Street Reconstruction project. 

Work was also performed to continue implementation activities required for compliance 
with EPA's Phase II Storm water Management regulations; such as locating and inspecting storm 
drain outlets, investigation and elimination of illicit discharges; and adding data to the GIS 
system to complete a town wide drainage map. Activity reports from various town departments 
involved in the program were documented and utilized for preparation of the annual Stormwater 
Management report which was submitted to EPA in April. 

Further development and maintenance of the Towns GIS system was performed such as: 
develop the GIS website; update software; continue development of the drainage, water and 
sewer utility layers; updating the parcel maps for the Town Assessor and creating various maps 
for other town departments. 

Preliminary and Definitive Subdivision Plans and Site Plans were reviewed for the 
Planning Board - checked for design conformance and adequacy of proposed roads and utilities. 
Road and utility construction in new subdivisions and site developments such as Christian Way, 
Gregory Circle, Leah Way, Lowell Street at the Town line and Andover Country Club were 
inspected and tested to insure compliance with Town construction standards. Performance bond 
amounts were calculated as requested by the Planning Board. 



50 



Street opening permits for the installation and repair of various underground utilities by 
Bay State Gas Company, Verizon, National Grid, Comcast and other private contractors were 
issued and utility markouts and inspections were performed. This year included new gas mains 
on Ferndale Avenue, Brechin Terrace, Leah Way and Burton Farm Drive. Also in 2009, new 
State-mandated Trench Permits were issued as required for various trench excavations. 

The Engineering Division also provided and maintained records of various utilities, street 
excavations, residential and industrial site development, street layouts and road maintenance. 





2007 


2008 


2009 


Storm Drain Design & Construction (ft.) 





800 


1507 


Sewer Main Design & Construction (ft.) 





4,740 





Sidewalk Design & Construction (ft.) 





2,800 


330 


Water Main Design & Construction (ft.) 










Streets Resurfaced (miles) 


6.8 


5.7 


4.7 


Street Opening Permits Issued & Inspected 


327 


304 


179 


Sewer Connections reviewed for Board of 
Health 


125 






Assessors Maps updated 


27 


21 


29 


Subdivision/Site Plans reviewed (# plans/# lots) 


17/35 


16/44 


14/35 


Performance Bonds figured for Planning Board 


6 


7 


5 


Drainage outfalls located, mapped and inspected 


309 


45 


18 


Subdivision Construction Inspections/Tests: 








Water mains (ft.) 


3489 


3,132 


4,381 


Sewer mains (ft.) 


1560 


1,715 


694 


Drain lines (ft.) 


2998 


1,517 


454 


Sidewalks (ft.) 


7730 


2,294 


1,314 


Roads Paved: Binder coarse (ft.) 


3001 


1,152 


1,193 


Top coarse (ft.) 


5272 


1,993 


2,130 


Streets Reviewed for Town Acceptance 


2 


2 


2 


GIS data requests completed 


18 


4 


4 


GIS Map requests completed 


20 


15 


15 


GIS data layers maintained/edited 


19 


11 


10 


Trench Permits issued (new 2009) 


n/a 


n/a 


49 



51 



HIGHWAY 

The Highway Division is responsible for road maintenance, including rebuilding and 
resurfacing of approximately 200 miles of existing roads. During the fall, spring and summer 
months, two sweepers are continuously kept busy cleaning winter sand off all streets and 
cleaning road construction areas. A few days per week the sweepers start work at 5 a.m. to take 
advantage of low traffic and parking conditions especially in business areas. The Highway 
Division is responsible for the maintenance of the Town's sidewalk infrastructure. The Division 
also assists the Engineering Division in inspecting new roads prior to acceptance as public ways. 
The Division is responsible for the cleaning and maintenance of all storm water culverts and 
drainage systems including catch basin and pipe cleaning as well as maintenance of water 
courses on public property impaired by beaver dams. The Highway Division is the lead agency 
responsible for snow and ice removal and flood control measures; other Town divisions assist in 
these operations. 





2007 


2008 


2009 


Number of streets resurfaced 


28 


10 


8 


Total number of miles of road resurfaced 


6.9 


5.7 


4.7 


Total number of feet of curbs constructed 


6250 


6225 


13500 


Catch basins cleaned 


670 


2525 


1530 


Storm drains/culverts cleaned 


256 


250 


189 


Catch basins repaired 


92 


86 


61 


Storm drains repaired 


21 


25 


18 


Snow storms 


4 


9 


10 


Sanding events 


19 


45 


18 


Signs repaired/installed 


338 


397 


338 


Masonry wall repairs 


16 


18 


17 



WATER TREATMENT PLANT 

During 2009, the treatment plant processed more than 2.2 billion gallons of water - a 
daily average of 6.19 million gallons - to produce over 2 billion gallons of finish water delivered 
to the distribution system. To augment available water supplies, 1.03 billion gallons were 
diverted from the Merrimack River to Haggetts Pond through the Fish Brook pump station. The 
Fish Brook station was online for a total of 158 days over the course of the year. The chart 
below illustrates the breakdown of total water consumption. 





2007 


2008 


2009 


Gallons of water treated (in millions) 


2607 


2702 


2200 


Average daily gallons pumped (in million gal.) 


7.1 


7.3 


6.2 


Maximum day (in million gallons) 


12.62 




11.5 



52 



2009 Water Consumption by Type 



Irrigation Agriculture 

203,155,446MG 429,202 
12% 0% 





Weekly, monthly and quarterly sampling was completed, as well as QA/QC testing 
required to maintain full certification of the Laboratory for the analysis of potable and non- 
potable water. Over 400 samples were processed by the laboratory for neighboring towns, over 
two dozen resident-requested samples were analyzed and over 50 storm water samples were 
processed for various parameters. 

During the four compliance periods of 2009, volatile organic compounds, secondary 
contaminants, disinfection byproducts and perchlorate levels were monitored in the finished 
water. Annual testing for bromate, nitrate and nitrite in the finished water was completed, and 
supplementary testing of the raw and finished water for synthetic organic compounds was also 
done. Weekly monitoring for coliform bacteria was conducted at the plant and throughout the 
distribution system; there were no violations of the Total Coliform Rule in 2009 and regular 
monitoring for Giardia, Cryptosporidium and enteric viruses suggests 99.9% removal of these 
organisms during the treatment process. The sampling portion of Andover's Initial Distribution 
System Evaluation was begun in 2008 and completed in early 2009. In compliance with recently 
promulgated EPA regulations, over 1 60 samples were taken and submitted for analysis over the 
course of the project. A completed report was submitted to EPA late 2009 and received 
approval. Sampling and reporting continued for the Stage 2 Long Term Enhanced Surface Water 
Treatment Rule in 2009. 

All operators maintained current licensing, including five operators holding 4C licenses, 
three holding 4T licenses and two holding 3D licenses. An annual walk-through was completed 
to assess and upgrade existing safety measures as appropriate. In 2009, work continued on the 



53 



WTP Emergency Response Plan in an effort to improve and update all information, 
including schematics and maps of pertinent valve locations throughout the distribution system. 
Hands-on training for WTP staff was designed and was reviewed and approved by DEP for 
continuing education credits for WTP operators. 

WTP staff also held seats on the New England Water Works Association (NEWWA) 
Disinfection Committee, Residuals Committee and Safety Committee, as well as contributed to 
classes offered by NEWWA on various pertinent topics. WTP staff also maintained membership 
in the NE/MVCC consortium for the purchase of bulk treatment chemicals and collaborated with 
the Greenscapes North Shore Initiative to bring the Greenscapes 2009 Program to Andover in 
fulfillment of Water Management Act and Stormwater Management requirements. 



WATER DISTRIBUTION 

The Water Distribution Division consists of six (6) licensed distribution operators that are 
responsible for the maintenance and repair of the water infrastructure. The distribution system 
consists of 250 miles of water mains, 6" to 24" in diameter, 2,100fire hydrants for fire 
suppression service, 1 1,000 water service accounts, 4,800 water gate valves and 5 water storage 
tanks. 





2007 


2008 


2009 


Hydrants Repaired 


191 


235 


189 


Hydrants Replaced 


17 


10 


9 


Hydrants Inspected & Serviced 


295 


315 


275 


Hydrants Flushed 


295 


170 


230 


Water Main Breaks Repaired 


22 


19 


26 


House Service Leaks Repaired 


9 


7 


15 


House Services Renewed 


20 


44 


16 


New Water Meter Accounts/Installations 


126 


113 


68 


Old Water Meters Replaced (Town) 


238 


195 


121 


Water Meter Replacement Program 


n/a 


n/a 


3947 


Water Meters bench checked 


10 


8 


12 


Water Shut Offs/Turn On 


113 


127 


285 


Gate & Service Boxes Adjusted 


52 




96 



SEWER 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of thirteen (13) 
wastewater pumping stations and the entire system of sanitary sewers. The sewerage system 
includes 150 miles of sanitary sewers, 6,200 connections and 3,300 sewer manholes. The raw 
sewage discharge from the Shawsheen Village Pumping Station is transported by means of a 
force main and 48" gravity system through the City of Lawrence to the Greater Lawrence 
Sanitary District's Regional Treatment Plant in North Andover for treatment. 



54 





2007 


2008 


2009 


Sewer Main Blocks Cleared 


17 


13 


6 


Sewer Main Rodded - Regular Maintenance 


96 


125 


140 


Sewer Mains Repaired/Replaced 


4 


1 


2 


Sewer Mains Rodded - leased Flusher 


n/a 


n/a 


32 



SOLID WASTE / RECYCLING 

Andover has its refuse transported and processed at the Regional Waste-to-Energy Plant, 
Wheelabrator, located in North Andover, where the refuse is incinerated to generate electricity. 
The Solid Waste Division oversees the mandatory curbside recycling program for 
newspapers/magazines, junk mail, office paper, cardboard, telephone books, paperboard, steel/tin 
metal containers, glass, #1 thru #7 plastics and aluminum containers. The Town negotiated to 
earn a paper credit when the New England index ("Yellow Sheet") price for news #6 is above 
$30/ton. The Town earned a total credit of $32,403 last year. 





2007 


2008 


2009 


Tons of residential refuse collected 


10954 


10292 


9874 


Tons of mixed residential paper 


2581 


2327 


2185 


Tons of corrugated containers 


287 


368 


350 


Tons of glass recycled 


737 


1000 


896 


Tons of steel/tin containers recycled 


43 


59 


53 


Tons of #1 thru #7 plastics 


43 


59 


53 


Tons of aluminum materials 


43 


59 


53 


Tons of leaves & grass clipping composted 


6900 


6350 


6875 



55 



PUBLIC WORKS STATISTICS 



STREET BERM CONSTRUCTION 




^ n u t u u ti 



E 

c 

V) 

z 
o 

-J 
_J 

< 
05 



3,000 
2,800 
' 2,600 
2,400 
2,200 
2,000 
1,800 
1,600 
1,400 
1,200 
1,000 



WATER TREATED 









u-i i^, m in )£ _-_ 






rg 


CO (— ) 

rsl ^ VO S 


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o 








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IN 








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- 






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SOLID WASTE & 
RECYCLING COLLECTION 




6,000 



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STREET RESURFACING 




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56 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Memorial Hall Library is the informational, educational, and cultural heart of the 
Andover community. The library is the place of first resort for traditional and innovative library 
materials, services, and programs. It also serves as a community platform for information-based 
technological innovation. The library continually strives to maintain a standard of exceptional 
service that contributes to a higher quality of life for all members of the community at every 
stage of their lives. 

In spite of significant budget cuts, the Library was able to roll out new services in 2009 to 
meet the evolving library needs of our patrons. These new services and equipment include: 

■ Text reference, Facebook page, Twitter feed 

First Andover Reads program - The Worst Hard Time 

■ New picture book shelving in the Children's Room - a gift of the Friends of MHL 
New energy efficient lighting 



Services with substantial gains in 2009 


Other extremely popular services 


Circulation of children's materials up 14% 


Ability to place requests in the online catalog 


Adult, teen and children's programming 


Teen Room 


Reference transactions, including chat 


Museum passes 


Computer signups 


TV program and foreign DVDs 


Use of volunteers 


Preschool story times 



Budget cuts forced the Library to close on Thursday evenings. This created problems for 
groups wanting to use a meeting room, for working patrons and for students needing homework 
resources. The goal is to reorganize and re-open on Thursday evenings starting July 1, 2010. 

Library Director James Sutton retired in July after sixteen years of service. Beth Mazin 
was appointed to replace him. 

SERVICE DATA 



Service 


2007 


2008 


2009 


Increase / Notes 


Total items 


252,069 


253,375 


253,511 


Stays static due to space limits 


Circulation 


492,648 


498,736 


530,425 


6% 


Interlibrary Loans 


69,518 


73,547 


76,047 


3% 


Programs - Adult/Teen 




250 


312 


25% 


Attendance 




7,063 


7539 


6% 


Programs - Children 


356 


318 


445 


40% 


Attendance 


7,315 


7,301 


8133 


10% 


Reference transactions 


58,422 


64,362 


67,362 


5% 


Computer signups 


54,278 


55,008 


73,570 


34% 


Number of volunteers 




227 


342 


51% 


Total volunteer hours 




3,431 


4,257 


23% 


Use of meeting rooms 




736 


748 


2% 



57 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 



BOOKS & PERIODICALS 




oo(T>o*-ir\iro^i-Lr>ioi^ooo"i 

CTiCTlOOOOOOOOOO 
CTiCTiOOOOOOOOOO 

TH'^HrNirMrsirslfMrsirsirMiNrM 



n Children m Adult 



75,000 
70,000 
65,000 
60,000 
55,000 
50,000 
45,000 
40,000 
35,000 
30,000 
25,000 
20,000 
15,000 
10,000 
5,000 



PC & INTERNET USE 




ccCTio^fMro^-Ln^Dr^ooCTi 
cncnoooooooooo 
cncnoooooooooo 
i-ii-.r\ir\irNr\ir\ir\jr\ir\ir\ir\i 



80,000 
75,000 
70,000 
65,000 
60,000 
55,000 
50,000 
45,000 
40,000 
35,000 
30,000 



REFERENCE QUESTIONS 



75,277 


71,101^' 


♦67,783 / 


/ \ 60,000 


59,618 


,> — / 62,426 


/ ^%-ii£?i 


l^.*** 1 '™ 


/ 54,680 


54.236 






I 40.327 







ooo^o-^HfMroM-Lnvorvoocri 
cricrioooooooooo 

(J>CTiOOOOOOOOOO 

HHNNfMNNfMNNNrM 



200,000 

175,000 

150,000 

125,000 

100,000 

75,000 

50,000 

25,000 



NON-PRINT CIRCULATION 



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en 

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fsj — a 



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ct* o o o 

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a Children 



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o o o o o o o 

o o o o o o o 

N IN N N IN (\ N 



s Adult 



58 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 



BUILDING DIVISION 

The mission of the Building Division is to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the 
Town 's residents and visitors, as well as to protect the value of the historic district and historic 
structures in the Town through the enforcement of State and local laws, by-laws and regulations. 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Building Code, 780 CMR, Architectural Access Board Rules and Regulations, 
521 CMR, The Zoning Act, Chapter 40 A of the Massachusetts General Laws, the Andover 
Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, Section 33, Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings, 
Section 36, BallardVale Historic District Bylaw and Section 37, Chimneys, of Article XII of the 
Town of Andover Code of Bylaws, as well as other applicable Town and State laws and 
regulations. The Building Division reviews all documentation (plans and specifications) 
submitted with applications for permits and issues all permits required for construction and other 
applicable activities for which permits are required by law. The Division performs all required 
site inspections as well as Code mandated safety inspections. The Building Division responds to 
customer inquiries, complaints and emergencies. Finally, the Building Division assists other 
Divisions of the Department of Community Development and Planning, as needed, in their 
permit processing and enforcement and attends, when necessary, Zoning Board of Appeals, 
Planning Board and other Commission meetings. 

BUILDING DIVISION STATISTICS 



Permit Type 


2007 


2008 


2009 


New Dwellings 


21 


16 


16 


Additions/Alterations to Single 
Family Dwellings 


832 


768 


755 


New Multi-Family Dwellings 


8 


5 


1 


Additions/ Alterations to Multi- 
Family Dwellings 


3 


29 


10 


New Commercial & Industrial 
Buildings 




2 


1 


Additions/Alterations to 
Commercial and Industrial 
Buildings 


130 


150 


129 


Schools/Public Buildings 


7 


16 


20 


Swimming Pools 


32 


19 


11 


Signs, Chimneys, Woodburning 
Stoves, Raze Permits 


77 


95 


71 


Certificates of Inspection 


45 


75 


59 


Zoning Verification 


99 


81 


118 


Total Fees Collected 


$1,115,029 


$1,373,432 


$739,696 


Total Estimated Value 


$83,422,069 


$102,983,523 


$55,919,813 



59 



ELECTRICAL 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is safeguarding the general public and 
property from the hazards arising from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is 
responsible for reviewing and granting permits and scheduling inspections on a daily basis for 
residential, commercial and industrial jobs, assisting the Police and Fire Departments in the 
investigation of accidents and fires. Electrical work includes, but is not limited to, wiring for 
lighting, power, fire alarms, security alarms, telephone and other similar devices, installation of 
equipment for emergency power, generators, transformers, switch gear equipment, panel boards 
and similar equipment. The Electrical Inspector also reviews violations of the Electrical Code 
and inspects the corrective work for protection of the users and cooperates with the various 
electric companies that service the area. 

2007 2008 2009 

Electrical Permits 1120 1147 911 

Fees Collected $115,282 $106,458 $83,474 



PLUMBING AND GAS 

All plumbing and gas fitting installations are controlled through enforcement of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code, formulated by the 
Board of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 142. 

The Plumbing and Gas Inspector issues permits for the installation of gas piping, 
plumbing and sewer installations and repairs. Inspections are conducted as necessary to ensure 
compliance with State Codes. Complaints and violations are also investigated and corrected or 
reported to the proper authorities. 

2007 2008 2009 



Plumbing Permits 


655 


701 


533 


Plumbing Fees Collected 


$42,992 


$41,007 


$34,199 


Gas Permits 


577 


588 


458 


Gas Fees Collected 


$32,230 


$28,517 


$23,111 


Seals 


6 


2 


8 


Seal Fees Collected 


$655 


$50 


$480 



60 



CONSERVATION DIVISION 

The mission of the Conservation Commission is to protect Andover's natural resources 
and to act as trustees in perpetuity of the Town 's conservation land. 



The Conservation Division is responsible for the protection of Andover's rivers, lakes 
and wetlands and provides staff support to the Andover Conservation Commission. The 
Commission's principal duties include enforcement and administration of the Massachusetts 
Wetlands Protection Act and the Andover Wetlands Protection Bylaw (regulation of residential, 
industrial and commercial development activity in or near flood plains, water bodies, and 
wetland areas). The Commission is also responsible for the acquisition and maintenance of 
Town-owned Conservation Land comprising close to 2,000 acres of public open space. The 
Commission manages the volunteer Conservation Overseers and Conservation based Eagle Scout 
Projects; the periodic up-date of the Andover's Open Space and Recreation Plan; and serves as 
liaison with other official and informal organizations concerned with conservation and open 
space preservation. The Conservation Commission consists of seven volunteer members who 
are appointed annually by the Town Manager to staggered three-year terms. 

The Conservation Commission bid farewell to Commissioner Paul Finger after many 
years of volunteer service. Emerson University Professor Dr. Jon Honea was subsequently 
appointed as a new member of the Commission. 

In the coming year, the Commission plans to host a Conservation Overseers meeting for 
the Town's network of trail volunteers as well as an Ecological Meeting for the many municipal 
and environmental groups that are interested in assuring that the proposed 1-93 corridor project 
provides protection to the Town's river ways and conservation interests. The staff and 
Commission will continue to explore options for the restoration of the Shawsheen River and 
looks forward to improving the passive recreation interests of the conservation land on the 
former Reichhold site and other Town reservations. 

Conservation Land Improvement & Community Outreach 

The Conservation Division had a great year for land improvement of our nearly 2,000 
acres of Conservation Land. Volunteers cleared new trails and re-opened old ones on the Bald 
Hill and Wood Hill Reservations. With the assistance of staff from the Plant and Facilities 
Department and the Department of Public Works, an attractive trail-head was constructed on 
High Plains Road establishing a safe parking area for visitors. 

The Commission enjoys one of the largest partnerships with local Scout organizations in 
the state. This year several advanced Scout projects were completed including a picnic area at 
Pole Hill, beach clearing and benches at Fosters Pond, a new bridge on the Merrimack River and 
a canoe launch and new picnic area on the Shawsheen River. Several rustic camping areas for 
Boy Scout, Girl Scout and other group programs were also built. A monthly overnight camping 
series open to the general public was initiated. The Commission hosted an event in conjunction 
with the Andover Historical Society at Serio's Grove, a riverside reservation, featuring several of 



61 



the original owners of the property and a special congratulatory video recording from comedian 
and former Andover resident Jay Leno. 

With the assistance of volunteers from the South Church, Free Christian Church, students 
from Phillips Academy and the Pike School and the Andover Trails group, new community 
pathways were built on several reservations under the supervision of the Commission's Special 
Projects Manager Robert Decelle. 

The Commission took several innovative steps to control invasive plant species on 
conservation land. These efforts included permitting the release of purple loosestrife-eating 
beetles in conservation wetlands and the use of dairy goats to eat and clear invasive bittersweet 
and buckthorn from the Virginia Hammond Reservation's meadow habitat. 

Open Space Plan 

The Commission completed a year-long project to update the Town's Open Space Plan. 
This project involved staff from each Town department and civic groups. The Andover League 
of Women Voters hosted a public forum for input on the plan and hundreds of questionnaires 
were received with citizen's comments. The plan will provide a strong guide for the 
establishment of new active and passive recreation opportunities. This plan, accepted by the 
Commonwealth, also opens up the doorway for the Town to apply for matching grants money 
from the State. 

Shawsheen River Restoration 

The Commission is looking at several options to restore the Shawsheen River. Currently, 
a research team is studying the feasibility of the removal of three dams - the Balmoral dam in 
Shawsheen, the Marland Place dam off Stevens Street and the dam in Ballardvale. To date, 
studies of the river depth, sedimentation and history have taken place. The funding for this 
program has come from State, Federal and private sources at no cost to the Town. 

Heffron Right of Way 

In a cooperative effort with Phillips Academy and the Greater Lawrence Technical High 
School, the Conservation Commission established a new right-of-way to its reservation lands 
alongside the Merrimack River. This tranquil riverside area is ideal for hiking, bird watching, 
canoeing and kayaking. 

New Restrictions/ Properties 

The Commission negotiated major conservation restrictions for Sellers Farm Estate. 



62 



CONSERVATION DIVISION STATISTICS 





2007 


2008 


2009 


Conservation Commission Meetings 


92 


25 


25 


Public Hearings & Public Meetings 


103 


128 


136 


Abbreviated Notices of Resource Area 
Delineation 


8 


4 


8 


Orders of Conditions Issued 


43 


23 


22 


Amended Orders of Conditions Issued 


5 


-0- 


1 


Certificates of Compliance Issued 


24 


20 


33 


Determinations of Applicability Issued 


79 


43 


72 


Extension Permits 


11 


11 


16 


Notification of Satisfactory Completion of 
Work 


24 


29 


32 


Findings of Significance Issued 


13 


13 


8 


Enforcement Orders Issued 


8 


9 


8 


Emergency Certifications 


8 


1 


18 


Acres of Conservation Land Acquired 


0.5 


-0- 


-0- 


Wetland Filing Fees Collected 


$33,920.50 


$16,775.00 


$20,337.50 


Fines (Tickets) Collected 


$1,600.00 


$3,100.00 


-0- 











63 



HEALTH DIVISION 

The mission of the Andover Board of Health is to promote and protect the public health 
including the physical, mental, emotional and social wellness of all the people. 

The Health Division is responsible for ensuring the protection of the public and 
environmental health. The Sanitarians supervise the inspection and public health education programs 
in matters dealing with the State Sanitary Code and the State Environmental Code, including 
complaint investigation, wastewater disposal, food safety, swimming pool operations, recreational 
camp programs, and many other services. The Public Health Nurse is primarily responsible for all 
medical clinical administrative matters, including communicable disease investigations, vaccination 
programs, and health promotion programs. The Director of Public Health serves as staff supervisor, 
ensuring that public health programs are offered in a coordinated manner, and is the liaison to 
various boards. The Director designs, programs, and implements policies as proposed by the 
Andover Board of Health to meet the health needs of the community. The Board of Health consists 
of three volunteer members appointed by the Town Manager for staggered three-year terms. 

Issues of note from 2009 include: 

The H1N1 Influenza Pandemic required an enormous outlay of time and energy of the staff 

as we provided public education and then immunizations. 

Seasonal flu clinics were moved up by one month to provide immunizations before the H1N1 

vaccine arrived; roughly 1,800 doses were distributed in a short time period. 

The Public Health Nurses continued their Shingles Vaccination Program through a generous 

grant from the Andover Home for Aged Persons. This program, one of the first in the 

Commonwealth, has served 380 residents over the age of 60 and has been held out as an 

example to area communities. 

The Health Division is the host agency for the Greater River Valley Medical Reserve Corps 

which is part of the National Citizen Corps Program. There are approximately 160 volunteers 

from the seven member communities who assist with health-related responses in the 

community. 

Staff continued its work with the regional Public Health Emergency Preparedness Coalition 

outlining emergency plans and training to respond to public health issues. 



HEALTH DIVISION STATISTICS 

Board of Health Meetings 
Plan Reviews 
Food Inspections 
Environmental Inspections 
Complaints Received 
Administrative Hearings 
Total Permits Issued 
Fees Collected 



2007 



2008 



2009 



11 


14 


12 


248 


291 


243 


328 


339 


453 


386 


388 


346 


88 


110 


114 


9 


6 


2 


1603 


1347 


1337 


$142,950.33 


$151,032.27 


$140,034.48 



64 



HEALTH CLINIC STATISTICS 

2007 
Outreach Clinics 
Attendance 
Senior Center Clinics 
Attendance 
Office Visits 
Home Visits 

Recreational Camps for Children/Clinical Inspection 27 
Influenza Immunization 
Pneumonia Immunization 
Cholesterol Screening Clinics 
Attendance 

Mantoux Tuberculin testing 
Positive Reactor Follow Up 
T.B. Clinic Case History, Appts. & Follow-Up 
Latent T.B. Infection Reports 
Zostavax (Shingles) Vaccine Clinics Attendence 
* (Influenza Immunization figures include H1N1 immunizations.) 



2008 



2009 



21 


18 


20 


197 


197 


209 


49 


50 


50 


638 


556 


531 


209 


207 


280 


22 


25 


27 


i 27 


24 


21 


774 


1666 


3485* 


19 


20 


13 


11 


10 


5 


85 


44 


25 


1 


24 


11 


8 


7 


1 


49 


46 


17 


21 


19 


11 


145 


155 


78 



COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 

Animal Bites 

Babesiosis 

Chicken Pox 

Campylobacter 

Cryptosporidiosis 

E.coli0157.H7 

Ehrlichiosis 

Giardia 

Hepatitis A 

Hepatitis B 

Hepatitis C 

Influenza A 

Legionellosis 

Lyme Disease (Confirmed) 

Lyme Disease (Suspect) 

Meningitis (Viral) 

Pertussis 

Salmonella 

Shigella 

Strep Pneumonia 

Group B Strep 

Tuberculosis (Active) 

Tuberculosis (Suspect) 



2007 



2008 



2009 



26 


28 


25 








1 


20 


13 


11 


7 


10 


7 


2 


1 


1 





3 


1 





2 


3 








3 








1 


7 


4 


6 


6 


5 


13 





1 


14 


1 








8 


17 


44 


55* 


91 


76 





2 





3 


1 


1 


5 


5 


9 


-- 


2 








4 


3 





1 


1 


1 


1 


1 





2 






65 



Vibrio - 1 

Suspect Disease Requiring Follow-Up 17 29 14 

* (Suspect due to change in State reporting requirements) 

HEALTHY COMMUNITIES TOBACCO CONTROL PROGRAM 

The Healthy Communities Tobacco Control Program, a State-funded entity, is a collaborative 
made up of Boards of Health from twelve communities which are charged with the responsibility of 
enforcing Andover's bylaws that prohibit the sale of tobacco products to minors. This organization is 
also responsible for enforcing the State-wide ban of smoking in enclosed public places (including 
restaurants and bars) that went into effect in July of 2004. Healthy Communities serves as the 
Andover Board of Health's agent on all tobacco control issues. With Andover as the lead agency, the 
collaborative includes Haverhill, Lynnfield, Newburyport, Dracut, Methuen, Middleton, North 
Andover, North Reading, Reading, Stoneham and Topsfield. 

In an effort to curb tobacco sales to youth, Healthy Communities conducts quarterly 
compliance checks to make certain local establishments adhere to laws prohibiting sales of tobacco 
to minors. 

GREATER LAWRENCE BIOTERRORISM PREPAREDNESS COALITION 

The Greater Lawrence Public Health Coalition is comprised of seven community health 
departments including Andover, North Andover, Lawrence, Methuen, North Reading, Reading and 
Lynnfield working together to improve both regional and community capability to respond to public 
health emergencies. The Town of Andover serves as the fiscal agent for the Coalition. 

Coalition activities are funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Cooperative 
Agreement on Public Health Preparedness and Response for Bioterrorism through a grant awarded 
by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. In 2009, the coalition worked regionally to 
respond to the H IN 1 Influenza outbreak, helping members with flu clinics and conducting public 
education campaigns. Additionally, the coalition continues to speak regionally to public health 
issues, including food protection, housing issues and vector borne diseases. 

GREATER RIVER VALLEY MEDICAL RESERVE CORPS 

The Greater River Valley Medical Reserve Corps (GRV MRC) was formed in 2007, and the 
Andover Health Division became the lead agency in the spring of 2008. The GRV MRC consists of 
the same seven communities as the Preparedness Coalition, and is a partner program of Citizen 
Corps, a national network of volunteers. Local MRC units are community-based and function as a 
way to organize and utilize both medical and non-medical volunteers. These volunteers supplement 
existing local emergency and public health resources. Activities are funded by grants from the CDC, 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health and other National/Federal grant sources. The GRV 
MRC currently boasts a membership of approximately 1 60 volunteers. 



66 



PLANNING DIVISION 

The mission of the Planning Division is to ensure the orderly growth and development of the 
Town through sound planning practices and through the implementation of the recommendations of 
the Master Plan. 

Throughout 2009, the Planning Division continued its efforts monitoring the downtown 
improvements and facilitating communication between Massachusetts Department of Transportation 
(formerly Massachusetts Highway Department), downtown businesses and residents. The project is 
99% complete, with the remaining 1 % to include the landscaping at Elm Square, additional trees in 
front of CVS, and signage. The project improved the drainage, signalization timing and turning, 
handicap and pedestrian accessibility and lighting. Main Street properties provide significant 
revenue to the Town's budget and its economic health is vital to the health of the community. The 
downtown businesses, in conjunction with multiple Town Departments, held a very successful 
Andover Day celebration, an event to celebrate with the community. 

Looking to build off of the momentum generated by the Main Street Improvement Project, 
the Planning Division's long-term planning and economic initiates are continuing in Central 
Business District, specifically the Town Yard re-location and re-development project. The Town 
Yard Task Force was created in 2007 with the charge of evaluating the feasibility of the re-use of the 
Town Yard property and to consider alternatives for the re-location of the existing Town Yard 
facility. Grant money was obtained to hire consultants to evaluate the property, the market and the 
potential for re-development. The results are compelling and in the coming year, the Planning 
Division and Task Force hope to prepare the area for re-development through a tightly controlled 
process that is in keeping with the character of a Central Business District and is a better and more 
appropriate use of the property. At the 2010 Town Meeting, the Task Force will present Design 
Guidelines and a Smart Growth Overlay District for the area. For further information on this 
initiative, please feel free to visit the project website: http://andoveiTna.gov/planning/townvard/ 

The Board of Trustees for the Affordable Housing Trust Fund awarded $60,000 in grant 
money that from the Northshore HOME Consortium and will award $65,000 in grant money for 
projects that create affordable housing opportunities in Andover, MA. 

During the year, Division staff worked on open space preservation and wrestled with 
numerous subdivision and site plan proposals to achieve the best possible development on the 
Town's diminishing vacant lands. The staff and the Planning Board have continued to encourage 
Low Impact Development techniques for all new development proposals to enhance compatibility 
with existing neighborhoods and mitigate environmental impacts to the greatest extent possible. 

Throughout 2009, the Planning Division has continued to play a pivotal role in helping 
facilitate The Junction/Route 93 Development Area, which represents one of the largest 
concentrations of employment in Northeastern Massachusetts. Achieving a Lowell Junction 
Interchange has the potential of opening up hundreds of acres of currently landlocked and grossly 
underutilized industrial land as well as allowing for expansion of existing industries in the area that 
are constrained by poor access to the interstate. In working in collaboration with various town staff 
and community leaders from Andover, Tewksbury and Wilmington, the Planning Division has 

67 



successfully helped develop a consensus "Mixed-use Centers" land use vision for the development 
area. 

In anticipation of advancing the "Mixed Use Centers" vision for Town Meeting approval at 
either a Fall 2010 or Spring 2011 Town Meeting, the Towns of Andover, Tewksbury, and 
Wilmington are in the process of refining the vision by developing a form-based code (FBC) for the 
1-93 Tri-Town Interchange Development Area. The FBC will guide the thoughtful development of 
approximately 700 acres of land around the 1-93 Lowell Junction Interchange within the three towns. 
Form-based codes typically include recommendations on building height, massing, setbacks and set 
parameters for streets and streetscape. For Tri-Town, the FBC will set a design framework, goals and 
objectives for future development that correspond to the Unified Development Vision that was 
prepared back in 2007. 

The ultimate goal of the form-based code is to help facilitate more efficient land utilization, 
provide opportunities for increased tax revenues and increased economic development, while helping 
mitigate traffic congestion through abutting residential neighborhoods. For further information 
relating to the 1-93 Junction Development Area, please feel free to visit 
http://andoverma.gov/planning/i93/ . 



PLANNING DIVISION STATISTICS 

Planning Board Meetings 
Public Hearings Held 
Definitive Subdivision Plans 



2007 

20 

108 



2008 

18 

73 



2009 

20 

85 



Preliminary Subdivision Plans 
ANR Plans 



1 

22 



3 
15 



Site Plan Reviews 



Special Permits issued 

Lot Releases and Clearance Certificates 



17 
9 



11 
15 



14 
10 



Warrant Articles Reported 
Subdivision Guarantees 
Street Acceptances 
Revenues Generated 



19 



$92,700 



$28,127 



11 



$103,000 



19 



$53,600 



$53,515 $43,407 



68 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapter 40A, applicable sections of Chapter 40B and 
the Town's Zoning Bylaw. The Board meets on the first Thursday of each month in the 
Selectmen's Conference Room at the Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street. The Board of Selectmen 
appoints five regular members and four associate members. The public hearings by the Board 
are the result of applications in the following areas: 

A Variance from the requirements of the Zoning Bylaw; 

A Special Permit under the Zoning Bylaw; 

A person aggrieved by the decision of the Inspector of Buildings or other 

Administrative official; 

A modification or an extension of a decision; or 

Permission to construct low or moderate-income housing within the Town of 

Andover (Comprehensive Permit, M.G.L. Chapter 40B). 

Prior to the hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches are 
requested, legal advertisements are published and abutters are notified as required by law. The 
Chairman, in conformity with the Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations, conducts public 
hearings. Following the hearings, the members of the Board, when deemed necessary, view each 
property in question and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter. Based on the evidence presented 
at the hearing, and the applicable laws, a decision is rendered, signed and filed with the Town 
Clerk and recorded at the Registry of Deeds upon completion of the statutory appeal period. 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS STATISTICS 



Meetings: 


2007 


2008 


2009 


Hearings 


14 


16 


18 


Deliberations Only 


6 


1 


3 


Filed 


79 


69 


46 


Granted 


58 


49 


29 


Denied/Moot 


13 


5 


10 


Withdrawn 


5 


10 


4 


Continued/Undecided 




1 


3 


Fees Collected 


$31,385 


$25,338 


$13,884 



69 



950 
900 
850 
800 
750 
700 
650 
600 
550 
500 



BUILDING STATISTICS 



SINGLE FAMILY 
ADDITIONS & ALTERATIONS 

948 



875 9 ,9_. 5 880 






R?7 


r. 










— 


832 












7fi° 


749 


/DO 


6 


9 


9 ' 


1 


5 i 


1 


1 















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CTi CTi O 

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SINGLE FAMILY 
NEW DWELLINGS 




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BUILDING PERMITS 




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$1,900,000 

$1,700,000 

$1,500,000 

$1,300,000 

$1,100,000 

$900,000 

$700,000 

$500,000 

$300,000 

$100,000 



PERMIT FEE REVENUE 



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70 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC HEALTH STATISTICS 



PLANNING BOARD 
PUBLIC HEARINGS 




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PLANNING DIVISION 
PLAN REVIEWS 




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Preliminary Subdivision 
■ Site Plan Reviews 



□ Definitive Subdivision 

□ ANR Plans 



4,250 
3,750 
3,250 
2,750 
2,250 
1,750 
1,250 
750 
250 



VACCINATIONS 

(2009 Includes 1,224 H1N1 Vacs.) 



oocriO'-irsin'<3-Ln!X)i v ~coo~i 

CTiCTiOOOOOOOOOO 
CTiCTiOOOOOOOOOO 

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220 
200 



PUBLIC HEALTH 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

SURVEILLANCE 



210 




Oi-irsiro^-Ln<X)rvoocn 

OOOOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOO 

(MrMrMrMrNjiNrsirMrMrM 



71 



ANIMAL INSPECTION 



2007 2008 2009 



Number of dogs quarantined for biting 

Number of animals tested for Rabies 

Number of animals testing positive for Rabies 

Number of cats quarantined for Rabies exposure 

Number of dogs quarantined for Rabies exposure 

Number of barns inspected 

Number of beef cattle 

Number of beef steers 

Number of beef herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 

Number of horses 

Number of donkeys 

Number of sheep 

Number of goats 

Number of swine 

Number of swine herds 

Number of Llamas 



The annual Rabies Immunization Clinic was held on Saturday, April 8, 2009 at the Andover 
Animal Hospital on Lowell Street. 



16 


25 


18 


13 


7 


7 











50 


35 


35 


13 


14 


14 


16 


16 


15 


3 


3 














2 


1 





74 


78 


68 


4 


5 


5 


3 








3 


3 





65 


65 


100 


1 


1 


1 


7 


13 


27 



72 



DIVISION OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Division of Community Services provides the residents of Andover with a myriad of 
social, educational, cultural, and recreational opportunities embracing diversity and 
accessibility for all ages. Community Services strives to rate the pulse of the community and 
incorporate those ideas into valued programs for its citizens now and in the future. 



Community Services, better known as DCS, was established years ago as a traditional 
Recreation Department. As Andover grew, the department embraced a wider mission. Today, 
the Division is comprised of a full-time staff of five, hundreds of part-time adult and student 
employees, vendors and volunteers who provide over 600 programs, events and trips for our 
residents. The DCS office is located on the second floor of the Andover Town Offices, 36 
Bartlet Street, and offers customer service from 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday. 
Online registration for DCS programs is available through the website at 
www.andoverma.gov/dcs . 

Daytime, after-school, evening, online, vacation and Summer programs are held 
throughout town. DCS utilizes Andover' s fine public and private facilities including the public 
schools, the Greater Lawrence Technical High School, Kid's Club and the Old Town Hall for its 
programs. Special events and concerts are held in The Park, tennis lessons at Recreation Park, 
adult co-ed softball leagues on Town fields and swimming and boating programs at Pomps Pond. 
Outdoor sports programs for children are held on fields throughout Town. 

DCS continues to make improvements to Recreation Park and Pomps Pond. 
Improvements include the installation of new softball lights, new shelters for Summer programs, 
widening the road for safety purposes, trimming paths in the woods and landscaping to enhance 
the general appearance of the complex. 

Customer service has been improved by streamlining many of the procedures and 
updating the appearance of the office. Online registration was introduced in the Fall of 2009 and 
was extremely well received. More than 25% of all DCS registrations are being completed online 
allowing for after-hour and weekend registrations. The convenience of online registration has 
benefited both the participants and the staff. DCS is expanding their participant base to the 
business community by reaching out to Andover businesses and inviting their employees to 
participate in DCS programs. As Andover continues to grow and change, DCS adapts and 
changes to meet the needs of the community. 



73 



DCS PROGRAMS 

Classes & Programs 

A comprehensive program booklet is mailed to Andover residents in early January, June 
and September. Information for all programs, trips and special events for the upcoming season 
are found in the booklets. The current booklet and registration information can also be found at 
www.andoverma. gov/dcs . 



Statistics for participation: 

Winter/Spring 
■ Summer 
- Fall 



225 programs 
180 programs 
200 programs 



1,662 participants 
2,062 participants 
1,634 participaints 



Community Trips 

Each season DCS offers trips to a variety of locations. Some favorites include a Maine 
Lobster Bake, New York City shopping at the holidays, Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun Casinos, 
Nantucket and Martha's Vineyard, the Lakes Region and Fenway Park. 

Special Events 

DCS coordinates special events throughout the year which have become memorable 
family favorites. These programs are offered at minimal cost to residents and include a Spring 
Egg Hunt, Spring and Fall Town Yard Sales, the Fourth of July celebration, adult Ballroom 
Dances, a free Summer Concert Series, Preschool Park Events and the Father/Daughter Holly 
Balls. 

Sports Leagues 

Preschool leagues for children ages 4-6 include Fall and Spring Kickin' Kids Soccer, 
Spring Sandlot T-Ball and Lil' Hoopsters basketball offered in the Winter. Over 600 pre-school 
age children participated in these leagues this past year. 

Elementary & middle school children participate in youth basketball, the Bob French 
League and girls 7 & 8 grade travel basketball in the Winter. In the Spring, DCS offered a 
Lacrosse league for ages 5-8. Over 650 elementary and middle school children participated in 
these programs. 

Adult Co-ed Softball Leagues are organized through DCS. Andover residents and 
business employees have the opportunity to join one of the 24 teams in the Summer and 12 
teams in the Fall. Approximately 800 adults participate in this league each year. 



74 



Arts Programs 

DCS arts programs are offered throughout the year for all ages. Children's programs 
feature opportunities in theater arts with Confetti Kids, Children's Studio for the Arts and 
Summer Theater Ensemble. Additionally, there is a host of art, dance and music lessons for both 
children and adults. 

Summer Program 

DCS offers a variety of exciting programs to keep the children of Andover engaged 
during their Summer vacation. Listed below are just a few of the many programs offered: 

Drop-In Playground - housed at Rec Park and available to children entering 
grades 1 - 7 offering seven weeks of age-appropriate activities such as arts & 
crafts, games, sports and swimming. 

All Day Discovery - a full day, seven-week program for children entering grades 
K-6 which also offers an internship program for middle school students. 
■ Various sports programs offered such as Warrior Tennis, Warrior Football, 
Warrior Basebal, Beach Volleyball, Track, Fencing and Golf. 
Half day Pre-school Programs for children ages 3/4-6 explore sports in a non- 
competitive environment. 

RECREATION FACILITIES 

Recreation Park 

This large scenic park off Abbot Street is open to the public for a wide variety of seasonal 
recreational activities. Facilities include four lighted tennis courts, a ballfield with lights for night 
games, picnic areas, children's play area, a sledding hill and restrooms. Whether you're looking 
to host a relaxing family picnic or an action packed birthday party, Recreation Park is the perfect 
place for your event. 

Pomps Pond 

Located off Abbot Street, Pomps Pond offers a spacious beach area, picnic grounds, 
children's playground area, canoeing and kayaking rentals, sailing and recreational and 
instructional swimming. The complex, open mid-June through mid-August, includes a 
bathhouse with showers, rest rooms, changing facilities, concession stand and first aid station. 
Andover residents may purchase beach stickers at the pond. Non-residents are charged the daily 
rate. Five hundred residents purchased stickers in 2009. Typically 150 people per day enjoy the 
Pond. 



75 



DCS STATISTICS 



RECREATION SERVICES REVOLVING 
FUND REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



$450,000 
$400,000 
$350,000 
$300,000 
$250,000 
$200,000 
$150,000 
$100,000 
$50,000 
$0 







□ Revenues 



□ Expenditures 



15, 

14, 

13, 

12, 

11, 

10, 

9, 

8, 

7, 

6, 

5, 

4 

3, 

2, 

1, 



000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
,000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 



SUMMER DCS CHILDRENS 
PROGRAM ATTENDANCE 

(FY98-03 Playground Program only) 




^vvvvvv>v>vv 



YOUTH SERVICES REVOLVING FUND 
REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



$360,000 

$320,000 

$280,000 

$240,000 

$200,000 

$160,000 

$120,000 

$80,000 

$40,000 

$0 




□ Revenues 



□ Expenditures 



11,000 
10,000 
9,000 
8,000 
7,000 
6,000 
5,000 
4,000 



JULY 4TH& SUMMER 
CONCERT ATTENDANCE 



iv 



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o 



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76 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES 

The mission of the Division of Elder Services is to identify, develop, implement and 
advocate for programs and services designed to enhance the quality of life and independence of 
elders in the community, and to provide a focal point in the community (Senior Center) where 
these programs and services can be easily accessed by elders and their families. 

The Growing Community of Residents of "Senior" Status 

As the number of Andover residents presently or soon to be 60 steadily increases, we face 
the challenge of identifying resources for an increasingly diverse elder population. The number 
of Andover residents aged 60+ has increased 40% in the past three years. How prepared are we 
to meet the various needs of a population whose ages range from 60 to over 100? What 
resources will be needed to support our oldest seniors living independently in the community? 
As a community, will we be ready as more residents seek assistance, either for themselves or for 
family members? Elder Services will continue to create and provide specialized programs and 
services in fulfillment of its mission, as laid out by the Council on Aging, following the charge 
of the Town Meeting of March 12, 1966: 

> Identify the total needs of the community's elderly population; 

> Educate the community and enlist support and participation of all citizens about these needs; 

> Design, promote or implement services to fill these needs, or coordinate existing services in 
the community; 

> Promote and support any other programs which are designed to assist elderly in the 
community; and 

> Enlist and develop capable volunteers and professional leadership for the purposes stated in 
this Article (35). 

To accomplish these goals, programs are designed to promote good health and nutrition, 
access to services and community life, financial and personal independence and to combat 
isolation. An emphasis on Health, Wellness & Nutrition programs provides a variety of 
opportunities to maintain, enhance and improve one's health. Continuing goals and objectives 
focus on improving social services, educational and recreational programs, intergenerational and 
volunteer opportunities and expanding outreach in the community. 

Challenges 

Increased costs and decreases in funding are compounded by an increased need for 
services. As we struggle to maintain core services with fewer resources, we have increased 
efforts to off-set related costs. Advocacy at the state and federal levels, grant writing and outside 
fund-raising are increasingly important. We are especially grateful to the residents of Andover, 
'The Friends of the Andover Senior Center', The Andover Home for Aged People and the 
Executive Office of Elder Affairs for their financial support. Fees for service cover most 
program costs and are supplemented by coordinating programs and services with other Town 
Departments. Programs have also been developed cooperatively with area Senior Centers, Elder 
Services of the Merrimack Valley and the Andover/North Andover YMCA., in an effort to 
provide access to a variety of programs and services that would otherwise be limited by both 

77 



space and economic constraints. Access to affordable and accessible transportation services has 
improved, but remains limited due to costs. 

Increased Need 

Requests for sendees tend to increase in difficult economic times. Core services, 
including transportation, the Senior Connections Program, nutrition and Meals on Wheels are an 
invaluable resource. Requests for general information from both seniors and family members 
continue to increase due in part by the growing number of seniors choosing to remain in their 
homes. We have expanded our outreach efforts to provide information on a variety of resources, 
particularly supportive sendees and funding available to allow residents to remain living 
independently in the community. The need for the supportive sendees provided by the Geriatric 
Nurse Specialist to meet increased mental health needs has doubled in the past two years. Those 
aged 85+ are the fastest growing group receiving sendees. We expect these trends will continue 
as people continue to live longer and remain in the community rather than seek long term care. 

Accomplishments 

The addition of the Four Season Room has provided the Senior Center with a dedicated 
space for just "dropping in" rather than coming to the Center for scheduled events and 
programs. Before this delightful addition, most rooms were continuously being broken 
down or set up for the next scheduled activity. This welcoming environment encourages 
conversation and socialization and is a perfect spot to visit, read, enjoy the view, engage 
in a friendly game or just catch up on the latest happenings. 

Transportation sendees have increased dramatically with local weekly grocery shopping 
trips and other requested destinations utilizing the Division's twelve-passenger bus. 
A grant funded the printing of brochures to promote these long-awaited transportation 
senices and a GPS to assist with new pickups and trips outside of our immediate area. 
Requests for Medical Transportation has increased by nearly 20%. 

« Nearly 300 volunteers applied to "SCRPT" - the Senior Citizen Residential Property' Tax 
Work off Program. There has been over a 10% increase in this program. 

• The Council on Aging sub-committee researched options to help support seniors wtio 
wished to remain in their homes resulting in the development of The Andover Villages at 
Home (TAVAH), a non-profit assisted living without walls, to provide a comprehensive 
array of senices to make it possible to remain at home. 

BoomerVenture, Andover Activities for the Adventurous plus 50' s, has continued to 
garner interest from those who will soon achieve "senior status". Many of the programs 
were moved from evening to late afternoon in an effort to encourage more of a mix 
between generations, reducing perceived differences and enhancing social interaction. 
Collaborative programming with the Addison Gallery of American Art, the Consenation 
Commission and Commission on Disability in the development of a Community Garden 
and with the Memorial Hall Library on multi-faceted cultural programming. 



78 



ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



ELDER SERVICES REVOLVING FUND 
REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



$140,000 

$120,000 

$100,000 

$80,000 

$60,000 

$40,000 

$20,000 

SO 




X lt c •=* r> 



J>5 * 



□ Revenue 



D Expenditure 



X "^ X X X X X X X X X X 



S550,000 
S500,000 
$450,000 
S400,000 
$350,000 
S300,000 
$250,000 
S200,000 



VALUE OF ELDER SERVICES 
VOLUNTEER SERVICE 



$485 


■5QCT CA 


r- . 1 r 




5470,938 ^\ 


\A 




5427,916 




5439,600 


S400,525 


/ ! 


J S349.818 S391 ' 04f 


X \JS368,498/ 






5347,910 


S362,505 




♦ 5220,782 



<^- <r- <T^ £*> ^^ ^- <C"> ^ ^> £*> ^ ^ 



$300,000 
$280,000 
$260,000 
$240,000 
$220,000 
$200,000 
$180,000 
$160,000 
S 140,000 
$120,000 
S100,000 



TAX VOUCHER PROGRAM 
VALUE TO TOWN 




^vvvvvvvvvvv 



J 



35,000 
30,000 
25,000 
20,000 
15,000 
10,000 
5,000 




SENIOR MEALS SERVED 




X X X X^ X^ X^ X O *<^ x^ x^ x^ 



D On-Site Lunches O Meals-on-Wheels 



79 



DIVISION OF YOUTH SERVICES 

The AYS aims to provide young people useful experiences to promote healthy growth and 
development. It is our goal to build a network of affordable, accessible, safe, and challenging 
youth programs that appeal and respond to the diverse interests of young adolescents and their 
families. 



Andover Youth Services (AYS) was established to address the need for an increase in 
recreational, educational, social and support programs for the middle school and high school 
populations within the community. AYS supplies the youth of Andover with programs, services, 
and activities throughout the year. AYS provides a direct link that connects youth to their 
community. Andover' s young people face many challenges and it is our mission to develop and 
maintain a program that has the ability to be flexible and encourages all youth to use their 
creativity and spontaneity in positive ways. 

The support piece of AYS has continued to flourish with an increase in the community 
service program, our after school adventure-based program, drop in and flexible office hours, 
court-related services, volunteer and intern opportunities, hospital visits, referrals, college and 
employment, recommendations, fundraising for youth programs, crisis intervention, outreach, 
24-hour emergency response, parent support and education, discussion groups and specialized 
in-school groups. 

AYS events provided a community venue for young people to expose their creative 
talents. The 11 th annual "Keep It Wild" Fashion Show, Paul King 24-Hour Skate-a-thon and 
numerous concerts and dances attracted thousands of youth and presented unique entertainment 
opportunities for the Town of Andover. 

It is essential to connect with other people, groups and systems already working with 
young people. Andover Youth Services remains dedicated to establishing a community-wide 
network of supportive services for young people. AYS worked directly with the following 
organizations, creating and implementing policy, action items, fundraising, and advocacy for 
youth. Each of the following groups concentrates on developing programs, services and 
outreach to those young people who are not connected positively to the community of Andover: 
Andover Youth Council, Andover Youth Foundation, Friends of Andover Youth, Andover 
Community Advocates for Resources, Education and Support (CARES), Gender Equity 
Committee and AMC Youth Opportunities Program (YOP). 

AYS receives ideas and concepts directly from the young people themselves and then 
takes these ideas and empowers the youth to make them happen. By interacting alongside young 
people, whether it is handing out flyers or working towards a new Youth Center, the programs 
the Youth Services creates and implements are immediate reflections of what the youth want and 
need. By staying true to our philosophy, AYS will continue to provide a diverse range of 
activities, events, groups, and programs for all young people of Andover. 



80 



AYS PROGRAMS 

The Andover Youth Services Summer Program - Gold Rush - May to August 

Gold Rush was an eight-week program open to all Andover youth eleven to eighteen years of 
age. Young people at these ages are in transition from childhood to adulthood and are in 
various stages of cognitive, physical, emotional, social and moral development. They need 
guidance and support through this stage of self-discovery, expanding horizons and emerging 
independence. AYS understands their developmental needs and responds with a lineup of 
activities, clinics, adventures, field trips and community service opportunities that appeal to 
the individual interests of young people. Over 1,700 young people received a chance to 
express themselves and share their experiences in a positive, supporting environment. The 
program offered 78 trips, adventures and services and encouraged them to participate and 
experience activities that were new, diverse and challenging. 

Ultimate Frisbee - Year round 

On the youth level, middle school boys and girls learned the multiple throws, offense and 
defense strategies and other skills in this fast-paced sport. The team competed in a huge 
tournament in Amherst, MA and a few games against neighboring communities. 
Additionally, AYS continued its support of the high school ultimate team which does not fall 
under the athletic budget. Ultimate involves over 140 kids each Spring. 

Field Hockey - Summer - Fall 
AYS continued to expand a middle school girls field hockey team that competed against 
neighboring towns and brought high school students into a mentoring role by providing 
instruction on stick-handling, passing and other elements of the game. 

Wrestling - November - March 
AYS continued to bring new sports to the youth and high school scene with the return of 
wrestling. This year marked the return of varsity wresting to Andover High. AYS has funded 
the team for the last four years and they had a full varsity schedule. The youth program 
continued to flourish and there were over 100 wrestlers between the two age groups. 

Basketball, Open Gym - Year round 

In the AYS tradition of taking new ideas and generating them into programs, a street hockey 
program, Open Gym and AYS High School Summer Basketball League became instant 
successes. Open gym provided a similar pick up atmosphere for high school basketball 
players. 

■ Andover Snowboard Club and Learn-to-Ride - December to April 

The Andover Snowboard Club is a group of skiers and riders who share the love for the 
snow. This year we traveled to Sunday River, Pats Peak and Jay Peak. The Learn-to-Ride 
program continued to introduce kids to the joy of snowboarding. Experience riders were 
given the chance to develop their skills further as a part of the advanced session. 



81 



Lacrosse - Year round 

Since 1997, AYS has continued to expand Andover's lacrosse program. The youth league 
experienced an overwhelming increase in enrollment and additional youth teams were added 
for both girls and boys. AYS implemented several Summer lacrosse programs due to the 
overwhelming demand for year-round lacrosse. Youth Services produced successful 
beginners programs for youths ages 8-10 and pick-up leagues for middle school boys and 
girls who wanted to improve their skills or learn the sport for the first time. Lacrosse has 
been a year-round effort offering clinics, introductory sessions, and pick up sessions. AYS 
continues to support this growing program by sustaining year-round fundraising efforts, 
recruiting coaches and volunteers. 

■ Afterschool Programs - September to June 

Flag Football, Field Hockey, Street Hockey, Rock Climbing, Spring Open Gym, Ultimate 
Frisbee, Rugby, Middle School Intramurals, Track program, Volleyball program, Outing 
Club, Bowling Club, etc. 

Vacation Day Programs - September to June 

Developed a variety of program opportunities during the holidays and vacation days for 
middle school and high school students. 

SUPPORT SERVICES - Year round 

~ Green Team - A youth employment program for high school students at Andover High 
School. Each session of the program provides work experience and trains young people in a 
variety of skills including: locating jobs, employee etiquette and rights, self motivation, 
time management, multi-tasking and solid work ethic. By working alongside participants, 
instructors provide positive role models, create connection to something positive, and build 
lasting relationships. An additional component of the program is that the team must 
complete several community service projects. The goal is expose young people to taking a 
proactive approach to making the world a better place, starting with his or her hometown, 
and give back to the community in which they live. Upon completion of the community 
service component, the team is empowered to locate and complete several jobs for citizens, 
local government, and the community at large. At the end of the summer session, 
participants will receive a stipend for their completed tasks. The Green Team fills a void 
among the students by supplying valuable training, mentors, and a source of income to 
disconnected young people. 

~ Community Service - The willingness of young people to serve their community was 
demonstrated thoroughly over the course of the community service days. The young people 
enthusiastically helped community trails by dragging huge logs and boards to build a bog 
bridge, clearing brush and dead trees to create a new trail, and hacking through brush to 
reclaim an overgrown trail. On another service day we helped out at the Franciscan Center, 
clearing brush and restoring a peace garden. The energy of the youth was focused in a 
manner that verified that young people can make a visible difference in their community. 



82 



~ Expeditions - Offers a variety of challenging activities for young men and women. We 
create a powerful group by forming trust and building strong friendships/ relationships. The 
young people are challenged mentally, physically, and socially. By participating in this 
group, the youth will develop vital self-confidence that will carry into every aspect of their 
lives and community. 

~ Drop in and flexible office hours 

~ Court-related services 

~ Volunteer and intern opportunities 

~ Hospital visits 

~ Referrals 

~ Employment network 

~ College and employment recommendations 

~ Fundraising for Youth programs 

~ Crisis intervention - Outreach 

~ 24-hour emergency response 

~ Parent support and education 

~ Discussion groups - Specialized in-school groups 

~ Transportation 

EVENTS 

"Keep it Wild" Fashion Show - December to June 

The 11 th annual "Keep It Wild" Fashion Show provided 20 designers and over 80 models 
a venue to expose their creative talents. Over the course of six months, student designers 
attend clinics, have fabric shopping days, eventually sew outfits and recruit models to 
showcase their work. The magnitude of the show requires that the Town House be 
transformed into an atmosphere of style and fashion with pulsing music and a 1 00 foot 
runway. Five hundred people turned out for this unique June event. 

• Other Events 

Making Connections 
Service Club annual barbeque 

Concerts/Shows - Year round 

AYS collaborates with a variety of young people who are interested in putting on 
concerts, dances and special shows. Each show has its own particulars and on average 
one to two shows are produced per month. Examples in 2009: Dances, Java Jam, 
Hypnotude, several OTH shows, etc. 

ANDOVER COMMUNITY SKATE PARK - May to December 

■ The Andover Community Skate Park, a positive and safe environment, is open to all ages 
and abilities. It promotes and encourages individual expression and learning. The Park 
provides a positive atmosphere centered around respect for other and, most importantly, 
fun. 



83 



■ Paul King Skate-a-thon - The annual event was developed to honor Paul King, an avid 
skater who passed away in a skydiving accident. The event was 12 hours of skating, 
contests, music, art, food and, in the evening hours, movies and camping in the park. 
Aside from honoring an excellent member of the park, the group raised funds to go 
towards a new ramp in his name. 

■ The Park continued to play an influential role for AYS. Aside from normal hours of 
operation, many young people had the opportunity to participate in skateboarding lessons 
and clinics. High School mentors instructed youth on the various skateboarding tricks 
and ramp riding techniques. The ACSP hosted two professional skateboard 
demonstrations over the Summer with 400 spectators at each demo. Skateboard 
competitions allowed local youth to showcase their honed skills and win some prizes at 
the same time. The Andover Community Skate Park remains an extremely positive asset 
to the community. 

NETWORKING AND ADVOCACY - Year round 

It is essential to connect with other people, groups and systems already working with 
young people. Andover Youth Services is dedicated to establishing a community-wide network 
of supportive services for young people. AYS worked directly with the following organizations, 
creating and implementing policy, action items, fundraising, and advocacy for youth. Each of 
the following groups concentrates on developing programs, services and outreach to those young 
people who are not connected positively to the Andover community. 

■ Andover Youth Council 

AYS operates directly with the Andover Youth Council. The council is comprised of 
thirteen high school students. The mission of the Youth Council is to advocate for all youth 
and to bring more services pertaining to issues relevant to their lives. The goal is to empower 
Andover' s young people by getting them involved with community organizations, schools 
and Town government in order to create opportunities for youth. The council has become an 
official part of the Town structure and their office is located within the Town Offices. 

• Andover Youth Foundation, Inc. 

A non-profit corporation organized to undertake the construction of a Youth Center. 

■ Andover Community Advocates for Resources, Education and Support (CARES) 

Andover CARES is dedicated to supporting life affirming choices, fostering resiliency and 
increasing a sense of belonging in the community. 

■ AMC Youth Oppportunities Program (YOP) 

The Appalachian Mountain Club Youth Opportunities Program helps youth workers and 
youth-serving agencies offer educational and recreational outdoor opportunities for their 
youth. The AMC encourages the involvement of all people in its mission and activities and 
their goal is to be a community which is comfortable, inviting, and accessible for people of 
any age, gender, race, religion, ethnicity, ability, sexual orientation or socioeconomic status. 



84 



ADMINISTRATION 

Hiring, supervising and training seasonal, part-time staff and volunteers. 

2009 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

■ Created quality programs in four areas: recreation, social, support and education. AYS 
served over 7,000 participants over the course of the year. 

Completed the 12-month process of renovating 37-39 Pearson Street. AYS now enjoys 
its new 2,400 square foot headquarters. The house provides much needed space for 
storage, office space, program space and meeting areas. 

The Wrestling Team competed in its first full varsity schedule in more than twenty-five 
years and sent a wrestler, Reinaldo Brito, to the State finals for the first time in Andover 
history. 

Secured a $75,000 grant through State Representative Barry R. Finegold for exceptional 
youth programs. This money allowed AYS to support ongoing programs, mentorship and 
provide program scholarships. 

Provided a variety of service and outreach to young people and their families. 
Empowering young people to make their ideas a reality, listening to concerns and issues, 
college recommendations, referrals, non-traditional office hours, advocacy, collaboration 
with community groups and a variety of other services provides young people with the 
help or connection they need. 



85 



VETERANS SERVICES 

The mission of the Veterans Services Office is to do whatever is necessary to provide 
Andover veterans with benefits, entitlements and services whether they be medical, administrative, 
financial or quality of life. 



The Veterans Services Office provides or coordinates all state and federal financial, medical 
and administrative benefits to Andover' s 3,000 veterans and their families. 

State Benefits - The Office responded to increased Public Assistance requests from veterans 
for fuel, food, housing, burials medical needs and other services under Massachusetts General Law 
Chapter 115 (M.G.L. CI 15). This increase for Public Assistance is due to the tightening economy 
and aging veteran population. The Public Assistance program is paid for by the Town and 
reimbursed 75% by the State under M.G.L. CI 15. Throughout the year, the Veterans Office 
managed 1 9 re-occurring Public Assistance cases for veterans and/or their families culminating in 
over $75,000 disbursed to veterans and their dependents 

Federal Benefits - Obtaining Federal benefits for local veterans is a priority in the Office 
which includes service connected disability claim processing. Andover residents receive over $2 
million dollars in tax-free Federal veterans' benefit dollars annually - for the most part through 
service-connected disabilities and widows' pensions. 

The Office planned and coordinated the patriotic ceremonies in observance of Veterans Day, 
Memorial Day, Flag Day, the anniversary of September 1 1 and placed over 6,800 flags on the 
graves of veterans buried in Andover. Band concerts and other civic activities during the year were 
also handled by the Veterans Services Office which included a performance by The United States 
Army Field Band from Washington D.C. at the Collins Center. 

Highlights of 2009 include restoring the WWI German Howitzer in The Park and publishing 
Heroes Among Us - Book 1 - a book highlighting living WWII and Korean Veterans who were 
awarded significant medals such as the Prisoner of War Medal and the Purple Heart. The Office was 
active in the local coordination of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Afghanistan/Iraq "Welcome 
Home Bonus Program" which pays a $ 1 ,000 bonus to service members deployed to combat zones 
and $500 to those called to active duty outside combat zones. The Director continuously focused on 
improving and updating the Office's record keeping. An on-going project comparing Andover 
Revolutionary War records to the existing Veterans Office Records was launched in 2009. 

Fifty-one Andover veterans died during 2009. These veterans served from WWII through the 
Vietnam War. Several of these veterans fought in more than one war. 

The Director of Veterans Services also serves as the Town's Graves Registration and Burial 
Officer. 



86 



KEY VETERANS SERVICES : 

State Veteran Public Assistance Benefits (Massachusetts General Law CI 15 / MGL CI 15) 

Outreach, Intake and Counseling, Public Assistance Disbursements and Semi-Annual Audits 

Federal Veteran Benefits (Veterans Administration/VA) 

Disability Claim Processing, Elderly Aid and Attendance, Health Care, Burial and Widow's 
Pension Processing and Grave Marker Applications 

Graves Registration 

Veteran Funerals, Family Burial Counseling, Necrologies and Records Management for over 
7,000 Veterans (living and deceased) 

Committees and Coordination 

Patriotic Holiday Committee, Elder Services, Red Cross Armed Services Committee and 
local Veterans' Groups (The American Legion and Disabled American Veterans) 

Patriotic Programs and Ceremonies 

Memorial Day, Veterans Day, Patriotic Concerts, September 11 th Remembrance, Annual 
Veterans' Luncheon and other 

Memorial Care 

Monument oversight, dedication as needed and Veterans' Grave flags (10 cemeteries and 
over 3,800 flags) 



87 



ANDOVER VETERANS DEATHS 



Name 

Allard, Robert E. 
Begley, John R. 
Bensley, Gordon G. 
Brucato, George A. 
Bucklitch, Howard M. 
Carmichael, James G. 
Carnevale, William F. 
Cashman, William A. 
Collins, Thomas P. 
Davey, Hugh J. 
Demers, Leo M. 
Desrosiers, William A. Jr. 
Doherty, James D. 
Doherty, Joseph B. 
Duffy, Joseph G. 
Gioia, Alfred J. 
Gofstein, Bernard 
Gosselin, Raymond L. 
Gould, Robert P. 
Guzowski, Daniel P. 
Hall, Ernest N. 
Hannan, Lawrence J. 
Hood, Thomas M. 
Howard, Ronald N. 
Jenkins, Chester T. 
Kidwell, Edward W. 
King, Robert T. 
Liberman, Stephen E. 



Branch 


Service Era 


Army 


Vietnam 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Navy 


Vietnam 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army Air Corps 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


Air Force 


Vietnam 


Navy 


Vietnam 


Army 


WWII 


Army Air Corps 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army Air Corps 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


Korea 


USCG 


Vietnam 


Air Force 


Korea 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


Air Force 


WWII, Korea 


Army 


Korea 


Army 


Korea 


Army 


Korea 



88 



Name 

MacDonald, Leo E. 
Mararian, Michael 
McKinley, Robert E. 
McMahon, Joseph P. 
Meehan, Thomas 
Moore, William C. 
Moosa, Walter F. 
Murray, James E. 
Noonan, Robert T. 
O'Brien, Robert J. 
O'Donnell, Joseph F. 
Parker, Robert B. 
Polizotti, John J. 
Porter, Dennis V. 
Pustell, Robert A. 
Riley, Laurence W. 
Santangelo, Salvatore A. 
Silverman, Gerald H. 
Stone, Frederick T. 
Trumbone, Mary Jane 
Tymvakiewiz, John 
Waldie, Archibald D. 
Wesson, Charles H. Jr. 
Whitton, Edward R. 
Willett, Philip E. 



Branch 




Service Era 


Army 




WWII 


Army 




WWII 


Nations 


il Guard 


Peacetime 


Marine 


Corps 


WWII 


Army 




WWII 


Army 




WWII 


USMC 




Peacetime 


Army 




Vietnam 


Army 




WWII 


Army Air Corps 


WWII 


Marine 


Corps 


WWII 


Army 

Navy 




WWII 
WWII 


Coast Guard 


Peacetime 


Army 




WWII 


Air Force 


Vietnam 


Army 




WWII 


Army 

Navy 
Navy 




Korea, Vietnam 

WWII 

WWII 


Army 

Navy 




WWII 
Korea 


Army 




Korea 


Army 




WWII 


Army 




WWII 



89 



ANNUAL REPORT 

2009 

ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Public Schools, in partnership with the community, is to provide 
students with the knowledge, skill, and qualities required to be successful in a diverse society. 

The State of the Schools 

During the 2009 calendar year the School Department experienced major reductions in 
programs, services and personnel. Fortunately, we also implemented a number of cost saving 
initiatives including: negotiating a favorable bus contract for out of district transportation, 
providing managerial services for the food program at the Greater Lawrence Technical School, 
increasing our savings through a more aggressive energy conversation plan, and continuing to 
expand our grants and donation efforts. 1 

From 2005 through 2008 the School Department restored positions lost in 2003-04. 2 In 2009 
these gains were largely erased; however, as the losses in the chart below reflect: 

FY2009 Reductions 



Elementary Schools 


Middle Schools 


Andover High 


Central Office/District 


• Health (4) 


• Physical Education 


• Science 


• Custodial services (5) 


• Technology (4) 


• World Languages 


• Math 


• Independent Positions 


• 3 rd Grade instrumental 


• Library Services (3) 


• English 


(2) 


music (2) 


• Guidance (4) 


• Technology/Business 


• Clerical Positions (3) 


• Instructional Assistant 


• Special Education (3) 


• Social Studies 




time (equal to 1 1 


• Integrated Arts 


• Physical Education 




positions) 




• Instructional Assistants (2) 





In addition to these losses, it is important to note that the School Department never restored 
many positions eliminated in 2003: at the high school: dance teacher, 2 custodians; at the middle 
schools: 2 foreign language, 1 music, 2 technology and 1 integrated arts teachers and 1 guidance 
counselor; and at the elementary schools: 2 assistant principals, 5 PE, 1 music, part-time 
librarian, 3 custodians. Further, we did not restore staffing reductions in the Adaptive PE 
program; supply budgets were larger in FY2002 than in 2009; and over 50 stipends remained un- 
restored that provided support in the core curriculum to students and teachers. 

In past years the School Department made trade-offs in order to address the primary goal of 
preparing students for the global workplace. Some examples: 1) Mandarin Chinese instead of 
adding Spanish or French sections and 2) Middle School engineering program, in place of a 
music position. These actions enabled us to make small gains towards moving our system into 
the 2 1 st century, but fall short of enabling us to implement a comprehensive plan. 



1 Some of the new and continuing grants for FY2009: Teaching American History ($90,525), STEM Pipeline 
Fund ($57,588), Essential School Health ($126,000), and Gelfand for a state science and engineering fair ($9,900) 
In 2010 we submitted a major grant to the National Science Foundation in collaboration with 5 other districts to 
support and expand our engineering program. With a major donation from ACE, we have installed a new digital 
high tech language lab at the high school. Thanks to many donations from local groups and individual donors we 
have purchased much-needed equipment such as SmartBoards, documents cameras, LCDs, and MP3 Players. 

2 Elementary: health teachers, some PE teachers, 3 rd Grade instrumental music, nurse, counselor time and reading 
specialists; Middle: social studies teacher, health teacher, music teachers, guidance counselor; High: assistant 
principal, 2 program advisors, social studies teacher, music teacher, social worker, assistant track coaches, and 
teacher stipends for school clubs. 90 



Enrollment 

The 2009 enrollment in our six elementary schools had a small reduction, with enrollment going 
from 2,893 students to 2,885. The middle schools, at 1,486 was down modestly from 1,513 in 
2008, but up from 1,473 in 2007. The high school saw the largest gain of 1,796 students over 
1,721 in 2008, as a relatively small class graduated and was replaced by a larger 9 l grade, 
resulting in a substantial gain of 75 students. The enrollment at the high school is well above the 
1,404 population in 1997, resulting in considerable overcrowding today. Districtwide the 
enrollment increased by 40 students and the year before by 30 students, so it is important to note 
that while gradual, each year the district grows by the equivalent of more than one classroom. 

School facilities: 

The School Department continues to focus on the physical condition and capacity of our school 
facilities. At Bancroft there are structural building concerns, and at Shawsheen, South, West 
Elementary and the High School there is need for additional space, especially for special needs 
services. Chaired by Mark Johnson, a Task Force produced an initial report for the School 
Committee and Selectmen in spring 2007, and based on that report and supported by the two 
boards, drafted three Statements of Interest (SOI) to the Massachusetts School Building 
Authority (MSBA) to request financial support from the State for substantial improvements for 
three schools: Bancroft, Shawsheen and the High School. MSBA then directed the School 
Department to identify the school with the most urgent needs. Given the structural and space 
needs, the obsolete open-space concept, and the high cost of on-going maintenance, the School 
Department reported to the MSBA that Bancroft was the school most in need of major repair or 
replacement. In fall and winter 2007 MSBA announced that Bancroft qualified for a feasibility 
study, a first step in the process to receive State support to renovate or replace a school building. 
In 2008 the Town Manager appointed a School Building Committee, and Town Meeting voted to 
provide funding for a Feasibility Study. 3 MSBA and the Building Committee agreed that the 
Town would engage the services of the architectural firm Symmes Mani and McKee to conduct 
the feasibility study. That study is now underway with the Building Committee having reviewed 
possible sites for a new Bancroft and determining that the site of the current school is the best 
site. Working with both the School Committee and the School Building Committee, the study is 
in the final stages of determining: 1) the educational program, 2) the enrollment, and 3) the most 
preferred building option. The study continues to look into the possibility of a building project 
that would include some portion of Shawsheen. The School Department also submitted 
refreshed Statements of Interest for the remaining two schools (Shawsheen and Andover High 
School). 

School Administration: 

The School Department's administrative team in 2009 welcomed two new principals and one 
Assistant Principal. Jonathan Harris replaced Peter Anderson who retired after nine years service 
as the Principal of Andover High School and Pamela Lathrop became the Principal of High Plain 
Elementary School upon the retirement of Brenda O'Brien, founding Principal of High Plain. 
Assistant Principal, Thomas Mead resigned his position to accept a principal position in another 
district, and was replaced by incoming Assistant Principal, Christopher Phillips. 

The second cohort of Salem State's The Institute for Leadership Education (T.I.L.E.) program, 
which includes eight Andover teachers, is well into its second year of study. In the coming year 
the T.I.L.E program will expand to a third cohort. The district will continue to encourage the 



3 Reimbursement from the State for the Feasibility Study and any resulting construction for Andover schools would 
be approximately 41% with additional reimbursements possible for our maintenance record and incorporating 
"green" solutions into building plans. 



participation of highly qualified Andover teachers, as a means of attracting our most talented 
teachers to the administrative ranks. The district also will continue to embark on aggressive 
recruitment and retention programs for both teachers and administrators, because the shortages 
for both continue. To that end, for the last five years, Andover has been the lead district in 
bringing together 15 districts for the annual Merrimack Valley Recruitment Fair. The fifth fair 
was held in March 2009 to which over 500 teachers and administrators attended. In 2009 we 
maintained the services of retired Dr. Woods to oversee our teacher induction and mentoring 
program, and to expand our administrator mentoring program (a critical need given the number 
of new administrators coming into the district). 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND CENTRAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

The five elected members of the School Committee typically met twice monthly for regular 
session meetings during 2009. Annie Gilbert and David Birnbach were elected in March 2009, 
replacing Dr. Tony James who did not seek re-election and Dr. Arthur Barber. In April the 
Committee voted to have Attorney Debra Silberstein continue as Chair and Dennis Forgue to 
serve as secretary. During fall 2008 the School Committee accepted the resignation of the 
Superintendent, Dr. Claudia Bach, effective June 30, 2010 and secured the services of the 
Massachusetts Association of School Committees to conduct the search for a new 
superintendent. The Committee approved the Superintendent's Goals for 2009-2010, the District 
Goals and Objectives for 2009-2010 school year, and the 2009-2010 District Improvement Plan. 
In July the Committee began the development of a three-year strategic plan, contracting the 
consultation services of Lyle Kirtman of Future Management Systems. In the fall district unions 
notified the Committee of their intentions to engage in contract negotiations. The Chairs, Town 
Manager and Superintendent met a few times to review budget assumptions and upcoming 
contract negotiations, and the Tri Board convened to discuss rising health insurance costs and 
collective bargaining. 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

Teachers in Andover have been working effectively on a number of new and extended initiatives 
in order to increase teaching effectiveness and student learning. Here are some examples of the 
work that is ongoing in Andover: 

Math Curriculum Council: Middle School math teachers are researching math programs in other 

school districts. In a comparison of other districts' test scores and math programs, the single most 

defining difference is the number of minutes each district devotes to math instruction on a weekly basis. 

Additionally, elementary level teachers have completed the K-5 Math mid-year and end-of-year 

assessments. 

ELA Curriculum Council: As a result of the K-3 Balanced Literacy review last year, members of the 

ELA Curriculum Council have been working on a K-5 Writing Scope and Sequence this school year. 

On early release days, teachers are facilitating grade level discussions on the writing initiative. 

Social Studies Curriculum Council: Members of this council are meeting this school year to review 

and revise the essential questions at the Middle School level. 

Science Curriculum Council: Members of the science curriculum council have been reviewing 

textbooks and ebooks for possible adoption in the next school year. 

Foreign Language Curriculum Council: Members of this council have been engaged in a review of 

textbooks and ebooks for possible adoption in the school year. 

Wellness Council: With the elimination of health at the elementary schools, the Wellness Council has 

been engaged all year in researching the best way to deliver the health curriculum at the elementary 

level. 

The pilot of the elementary progress report has been implemented this school year. Parents and 

teachers have had an opportunity to complete an online survey. The results of the survey will be 

reviewed by elementary administrators and shared with the parents and teachers in the spring. 

92 



eTextbooks Course: A number of K-12 teachers are participating in a eTextbook course. The purpose 
of this course is to determine the best way to deliver the curriculum using electronic components and 
other digital media that will increase student engagement and learning. 

Despite the loss of 1 .3 positions in music at the elementary level last year and the subsequent loss of 
instrumental music at grades 3 and 4, our K-12 music teachers have been engaged in providing an 
excellent music program to students in our district. School and district concerts reflect the effective 
work of our students and staff. 

Business Office 

The responsibilities of the Business Office include managing financial operations and selected support 
services; developing and managing the annual budget, processing payables and payroll, labor contract 
negotiations and compliance, purchasing, fee collection, financial reporting, development of the Capital 
Improvement Plan and grants management. The Business Office, which includes the Copy Center, works 
with the entire school system and many Town Departments. In addition to financial oversight, the 
Business Office is responsible for facilities management (in cooperation with the Plant and Facilities 
Department), student transportation, school and district emergency management, custodial services and 
food services. 

Human Resources Office 

The Human Resource office continues to work on making its operations more efficient. In 
addition to various technological improvements made over the last few years, we have added: 

• Two computer kiosks to assist employees and applicants apply on-line; 

• Converted all school employees from Connect Ed to the new Alert Now system (reverse 911); 

• Completed the work on APS's new website; 

• Created a number of on-line forms and on-line interactions to expedite contractual provisions 
such as current seniority lists; 

• Created a feature on the automated application program that notifies applicants throughout the 
year of new postings as they become available. 

Despite a heavy recruitment load, the Human Resource office continues to make a concerted 
effort to mitigate recruitment costs by replacing print advertisements with electronic recruitment 
and on-site recruitment of teachers. For example, Andover is the lead town in organizing the 
Merrimack Valley Schools Teachers Recruitment Fair (generally held the last Thursday of 
February). The Human Resource office will attend a half dozen teacher fairs in order to develop 
this fall's applicant pool. This year alone, recruitment efforts have focused on: 

• Hiring key positions for the Andover Public Schools, including a new superintendent, a high 
school principal, an elementary principal, a school transportation coordinator and 26 new 
teachers. Of those new teachers, 1 1 of them are here on a permanent substitute basis for teachers 
on long-term leaves of absence. They're employment will end June, 2010. Of the new teacher 
hires this fall, 75% have a Master's degree or higher. 

• Key hiring for Town positions include a new library director and town clerk. Human Resource 
staff played a key role in managing the search process for these positions for both school and 
town departments. 

• The Human Resource department's newest training offerings included a monthly program for 
middle managers. Topics focused on developing good Human Resource practices such as setting 
high performance standards, documenting poor performance, holding difficult performance 
discussions, and negotiating conflict at work. Other covered topics included understanding 
generational differences and the town's budget. 

93 



• On a more sober note, last June marked the loss of some 33 school positions. Unemployment 
claims rose to 48. Some 6 months later, 17 employees (or 35%) remain unemployed. 

REPORTS FROM THE SCHOOLS: 
Andover High School 
Mathematics Department 

The AHS Mathematics Department is in the second year of implementation of a new elective in 
Linear Algebra. To give students an additional opportunity to expand their mathematics 
knowledge base, we are working with the Educational Development Corporation (EDC) to 
design and pilot this course, which is usually a College level course for math majors. Based on 
our K-12 Curriculum Council work, data analysis of MCAS results and internal assessment, the 
Mathematics Department continues to revise its curriculum, course offerings, and instructional 
practices. This year we implemented a course sequence for sophomores who struggled in their 
freshman math courses. These courses, called Math Topics 2 and 3, help to fill in gaps for 
students while improving their confidence in mathematics and moving them forward with 
curriculum at an appropriate pace. 

Science Department 

The Science Department implemented a new series of physics courses this year. The goal of the 
changes was to make Physics more accessible to a larger group of students. We currently offer 
AP Physics C, AP Physics B, and Level X A Physics. We will begin to evaluate the changes to the 
program regarding AP Physics B. The Science Department concluded that the math requirement 
would need to change and as a result, this change has been made to the course catalog for 2010- 
201 1. A new physics course is also being proposed, The Physics of Art and Music. This course 
will be a 0.5 credit elective. The other major initiative this year is the sustainable garden project. 
Ms. Cutler, a science teacher within the Department, has been working to fund a sustainable 
garden at the high school. The garden site has been cleared and first planting will take place this 
spring. To date, she has secured over $4700 for the project. Curriculum is currently being 
articulated for AP Environmental Science, AP Biology, and 9 th grade Environmental Science. 
Further articulation in Math and World Languages hopefully will take place during 2010-2011. 
Lastly, pilot testing for textbooks in 9 th grade Environmental Science and Physical Science is 
ongoing. Teachers are participating through science curriculum council and books will be chosen 
in May for implementation during the 2010-201 1 school year. 

Social Studies Department 

The Social Studies Department hired two new teachers for the 2009-2010 school year. Brian 

Carey joined the Department from Wood Hill Middle school and Evan Greenspan, who had been 

teaching Reel Life in the English Department, came on board to teach Broadcast Journalism. 

Teachers began the discussion this summer on creating a skills curriculum for both our 9 and 

10 th grade programs. We added two teachers to our AP US history program due to the large 

numbers of enrollment and a leave of absence. Both these teachers (Mary Robb and Rob 

Michaud) attended the St. Johnsbury AP preparation program during the summer and continue to 

work together as they plan classes and assessments. Six teachers spent time this summer 

exploring how to teach social studies through multiple lenses continuing our discussions around 

an interdisciplinary approach. This past fall we began teaching our 9 th grade World Civilizations 

courses as mixed level classes. Four teachers in the Department participated in professional 

development over the summer designed to develop strategies to incorporate differentiated 

instruction. Seven teachers in the Department continue to take advantage of the Teaching 

American History grant program under the direction of the Department's Lauren Ream and the 

University of Massachusetts at Lowell. 

94 



English Department 

The English Department at AHS builds on the strong foundations with which students come to 
us from the middle school English Language Arts program. The number of students taking more 
than one English credit per year continues to grow, our Advanced Placement numbers and test 
scores remain strong, and students in our grade 10 Twentieth Century Studies course will be 
offered the opportunity to take the AP Language and Literature exam this year in a pilot effort to 
increase student opportunities for AP credit in English. Our Journalism classes and a club began 
publishing an on-line student newspaper this fall. During the spring of 2009 work on the 
curriculum council, work by teachers participating in TERC projects, and work of many 
Department meetings focused on our summer reading initiative which began this past summer. 
In the fall of 2009 (and at the start of 2 nd semester) common essay assessments were used in 
individual classrooms and by the larger Department to assess the summer reading program as we 
examine student writing. Our staff has been most impressed with the level of participation and 
engagement of students in this initiative. We will continue with the project this summer, making 
calendar adjustments but no changes to text for next year. A fall professional development 
course on the use of rubrics resulted in the draft of a department writing rubric used voluntarily 
in grades 9 and 10 at the end of semester one, again with common questions; these modeled after 
recent MCAS long composition prompts. We continue to see growth in student achievement as 
measured by MCAS results. Ninety-five percent of our students scored in the Advanced or 
Proficient range and the number of students in Needs Improvement was cut in half from that 
number last year. Though our area in need of improvement is the topic development of the Long 
Composition, we showed substantial growth in that area with students on IEP's, and our efforts 
in strengthening student writing are Department wide. For next year we hope to run the 
interdisciplinary World Studies course once again and plan to offer Odyssey as a team taught 
course in English and Social Studies. On the negative side, class sizes did indeed increase this 
year, with many sections at or close to 29 students; and we were able to offer only one section of 
the popular film elective Reel Life. 

Counseling Department 

The Counseling Department is pleased to welcome Edward Abbot and William Hutchins as the 
new member of the AHS Counseling Team. During the first semester of the school year, the 
Counseling Department worked diligently with seniors on the college application process. It is 
important to note that 35% of the seniors (198 students) applied to colleges under the early 
decision/early action admission deadlines. As of February 1 st , 3036 transcript requests have been 
processed, of which approximately 2400 were completed by December 15 th . Early admission 
results were encouraging and included acceptances from Babson College, Boston College, 
Boston University, Johns Hopkins University, the University of Miami, New York University, 
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Northeastern University, Syracuse University, 
Tufts University and the University of Vermont. During the second semester, counselors will 
guide the underclassmen through the online course selection process as well as work closely with 
the juniors through the initial stages of college counseling, career exploration and post-secondary 
planning. 

Middle Schools 
Doherty Middle School 

Doherty's overarching goal is to enhance the academic, cultural and curricular programs at 
Doherty in line with research on best practices. Teachers in all three grades and all disciplines 
have made significant gains in adopting the following literacy strategies: differentiated 
instruction, concentration on open response questions, encouraging students to use active reading 
strategies, and sustained silent reading which h&ve contributed to our students' outstanding ELA 



MCAS scores. The Engineering initiative that is now in its third year, resulted in the adoption of 
an Engineering & Design program offered to all students in grades six, seven, and eight with a 
robust robotics unit introduced in 2009 - 2010. Our enhanced math supports (e.g., math 
extensions enrichment and accelerated math program) provide opportunities to extend our 
curriculum while our math strategies enrichment broadened the use of ACC math supporting 
remediation. Mathematics teachers continue to improve their differentiated instructional 
techniques when working with those students who struggle in mathematics, as well as those who 
move swiftly through the curriculum, contributing greatly to increasing MCAS math scores in 
our special education population and maintaining high results for all students. This school year, 
we created two new professional learning communities: a Technology Study Team designed for 
teachers to enhance their technological knowledge in how to better incorporate technology into 
their curriculum; and a Literacy-Fluency Study Team to begin the process of developing a 
strategic literacy action plan. 

West Middle School 

West Middle School has three areas of focus this year. The first is to continue to use Harvard's 
Teaching for Understanding instruction model as a way to create clear understanding goals for 
students. Using this model, teachers utilized faculty meetings and the professional day to create 
individual and interdisciplinary units that provide opportunities for students to perform what they 
learned in a way that will develop deeper and longer lasting understanding of concepts and skills. 
Our second goal is to bring 21 st Century technology to our teachers and students. Working with 
our PAC, we restructured our fundraising efforts. Three Fun Friday events were created. Each 
Fun Friday consisted of an afternoon of fun and games for all West Middle School students. The 
money raised from each event will be used to purchase at least one SmartBoard and document 
camera for each team by the December of 201 1. The Fun Friday last October and the Flamingo 
Fundraiser last spring enabled us to purchase two SmartBoards and two document cameras. All 
are being fully utilized by WMS faculty. The third goal for the 2009-2010 school year is to 
continue our efforts to create student leaders and students who are responsible and active 
community members. West Middle School students actively led and raised money for and 
awareness of: Muscular Dystrophy, Haiti Relief Efforts, Pennies for Peace (raising money to 
supply and run a school for one year in Afghanistan), Lazarus House, St. Anne's Home, and gifts 
for seniors who are alone during the holidays. West Middle School is lucky to have talented 
teachers, motivated students and a supportive parent community. We thank all for their 
continued support. 

Wood Hill Middle School 

This year Wood Hill Middle School has taken to heart the phrase, "Don't Stop Believing." We 
want all students to succeed and take responsibility for their learning while understanding the 
positive impact they can have on their communities. Wood Hill challenges teachers to learn and 
implement cutting edge practices for all students, and we have developed internal and external 
support for teachers through Expeditionary Learning (E.L.) Outward Bound. Our on-going work 
with Expeditionary Learning involves our community in highly researched practices and 
nationally recognized professional development. One component of E.L. are expeditions, which 
are multidiscipline projects that look at real world issues. This year teams and teachers have 
implemented expeditions such as Early Humans, The Road to Afghanistan, Ex "Bee"dition, 
Infectious Disease, Close Encounters, Capturing Culture through Photography, and Paris Cafe. 
The goals associated with E.L. fall in line with the findings shared by Dr. Daggett and the future 
of education for the 21st Century. In addition, we have implemented "Crew Time," which 
provides a small group setting for students to communicate about topics of adolescent concern 
with a thoughtful, caring adult. Expeditionary Learning continues to be funded through the 
generosity of Wakefield Inc., the Andona Society, private donors, and local fundraising. Our 



yearly evaluation completed with E.L. has indicated that we have made significant progress, and 
we continue to set instructional goals which are guided by the EL principles. 

Elementary Schools 
Bancroft Elementary School 

The Bancroft School Community is filled with anticipation and excitement as the Building 
Project moves forward. While we are proud of our unique school, the Bancroft Community 
recognizes that our needs can no longer be met in our castle. With our anticipation comes some 
sadness to see this open concept building close, a building that helped to form our culture. 
However, we look forward to a new home that will meet the needs of our students as twenty-first 
century learners. 

Being respectful has long been a focus at Bancroft School. Respect for oneself, for others and 
for the environment are top priorities. Children started the school year by signing respect 
contracts that state: 

1. I respect myself by working hard and making good choices. 

2. I respect others by treating them the way I want to be treated. 

3. I respect my school by making sure it is a safe and clean place to learn 

We hold school-wide meetings regularly to talk about implementing the three aspects of respect. 
Usually, students lead these meetings, demonstrating examples of respectfulness through skits or 
stories. Classes from different grade levels have become Bancroft Buddies, meeting regularly to 
strengthen bonds across grade levels while learning to be respectful and to expect respect from 
others. Children sign the Principal's Book when they are especially respectful. This is a book 
that will remain at Bancroft forever to document the wonderful citizens our children are 
becoming. When children do something worthy of special recognition, they sign the book and 
their pictures are posted on the Principal's Book bulletin board. We call our program C.A.R.E. 
(Care And Respect for Everyone). The Bancroft Community recognizes that developing and 
maintaining a respectful environment is an on-going process and one on which we will 
continually work. In summary, as indicated in our vision, we believe learning best occurs in a 
climate of mutual respect and kindness. 

High Plain Elementary School 

The High Plain Elementary school opened on Thursday, September 3, 2009 with 519 students 
enrolled in grades kindergarten through five. The students, parents, and staff worked diligently to 
create a supportive and caring school community. We began the year welcoming new and 
returning students as well as a new principal, Pamela Lathrop. We gathered together to celebrate 
success and learn about each other. The PTO Enrichment Council brought many wonderful 
programs to the schools where the children learned about animals, music, electricity, art and 
dance. During the school year we recycled, provided Thanksgiving meals for many families, 
collected winter coats for those in need, held a penny drive to raise money for peace, and 
engaged in several other service learning projects. High Plain School continued to reach beyond 
the school walls to affect others positively. Many students participated in our many clubs and 
activities sponsored by our Learning Leaps program. We tried hard to do our best in school and 
to be kind to one another. High Plain Elementary School embraced the theme of 'Everyone 
Counts" for the 2009-2010 School Year. We grew as readers, writers and thinkers. The students 
performed well in their daily work and on mandated tests. Test data was examined to determine 
areas of weakness and teachers met regularly by grade-level teams to review curriculum, share 
information and materials, and discuss appropriate instructional practices to meet the needs of all 
students. The High Plain staff is to be commended, who despite challenging times, continued to 
work hard for all students. The PTO funded programs, supported classrooms, provided fun 



family activities and coordinated a school newsletter. As always we appreciate the continued 
support of our PTO and the entire Andover Community. 

Henry C. Sanborn Elementary School 

Each year Sanborn embraces a schoolwide theme. This year, to realize our theme, "Building 
Bridges," we have expanded our connections within our school and community. Fostering and 
enhancing partnerships between classrooms, with Study Buddies, with West Middle School, 
Andover High School, and our local Senior Citizen Center has been a focus this year. We 
continue to foster a love of reading in Sanborn students through the Community Read Along, 
Magic Carpet Reading, our "Building Bridges through Books," Reading Incentive Program, and 
monthly Genre Study. We have continued our partnership with SHED/Kid's Club offering a 
number of their courses, with a science/engineering focus, to our students at Sanborn through our 
Explorations program. Our Explorations program continues to thrive and includes courses such 
as Science Explorer, Chinese, Spanish, Math Olympiad, The Final Cut, Outdoor Games, Book 
Making, Volleyball, and Floor Hockey. Sanborn employs the "Four Rs" of Respect, 
Responsibility, Resourcefulness and Reflection as a means to build character and foster a 
positive school climate. An inclusive Student Council approach allows each interested fourth and 
fifth grade student to carry out the "Four R's" by participating on one of ten student-directed 
committees. These committees carried out a number of community service initiatives, including 
projects which raised money for the Greater Boston Food Bank, Lazarus House, and the 
American Red Cross. Sanborn traditions also include activities around monthly character-based 
themes such as respect, honesty and acceptance. A monthly community-building School Meeting 
that is led by students includes skits on the monthly theme and culminates with the singing of our 
school song. Last year, Sanborn participated in a Model Classroom Project, piloting the use of a 
SMARTBoard in one of the fifth grade classrooms. This year, the faculty and parents 

collaborated on a "We're Fired Up About Technology!" initiative resulting in the 

installation of five interactive white boards and sixteen LCD and document cameras, enhancing 
technology integration across the curriculum. We are a community of learners and leaders and 
continue to set high expectations for students. Sanborn was one of five Massachusetts schools 
invited by the Unites States Department of Education to apply for Blue Ribbon status. We 
appreciate the continued support of our P.T.O. and the entire Andover Community as we strive 
to provide the best for our students. 

Shawsheen Primary School 

Shawsheen's theme last year was Endangered Animals . Each classroom "adopted" an animal 
and integrated it into the curriculum and activities. Our students continued to follow the school- 
wide theme of the "Golden Rule" by being role models for the staff, their families and each 
other. The PTO extended their generosity by providing materials, cultural events and overall 
support of our school. The community services sponsored drives for coats and gloves, canned 
items for food banks and books for the PALS program in Lawrence. The major fundraiser of the 
year, Math-a-Mania, was a huge success with the unbelievable generosity of our parental 
community. We had after school activities to fund a second SmartBoard in the school which 
allows the students to integrate technology into their daily learning. The entire Shawsheen 
community appreciates the support of the Town of Andover. 

South School 

This year's school theme, Everyone Counts, serves a dual purpose. Not only are we emphasizing 
the importance of honoring each individual, we are also promoting the benefits of connecting 
math and literacy. Staff members continue to make a concerted effort to utilize math-literacy 
materials to introduce and reinforce mathematical concepts to achieve this goal. New this year, 
students in third, fourth and fifth grade are enrolled in a web-based mathematics program aligned 



with the Massachusetts Curriculum Framework called Study Island. This online program allows 
teachers to customize programs for individual students so that they can build their mathematical 
skills based on their current level of performance. As part of our balanced literacy plan, we are 
piloting a program in kindergarten through grade three called Wilson Foundations. This resource 
systematically introduces and reinforces phonemic awareness, phonics, and vocabulary skills as 
a way to develop better readers and writers. 

Student Council initiatives continue to be a central focus. The Spirit, Community Service, Go 
Green, and Student Issues Committees have each made tremendous contributions to the 
promotion of a positive school culture this year. The annual Valentine Float Parade, the Respect- 
Responsibility-Kindness (RRK) Campaign, donations to the Andover Youth Services, clothing 
and food drives, and many initiatives to reduce, reuse and recycle exemplify the way our 
students are leaders in promoting team spirit, cooperation and respect for the environment. Other 
exciting school highlights this year include the participation of forty fifth-grade students in a peer 
leadership program, a new found partnership with high school students from the Andover Way 
Program who spoke to our students about the importance of good decision-making, and a 
wonderful all-school assembly featuring motivational speaker and former Olympian Molly 
Sliney who sent an inspiring message about believing in yourself. 

Through the generosity of our PTO, five interactive SmartBoards were installed in each fifth 
grade classroom and the library media center, providing a new and engaging venue for student 
learning and instant access to a plethora of internet resources. As always we thank our parents, 
community volunteers and organizations who continue to make incredible contributions to our 
community of learners. 

West Elementary School 

West Elementary School continued with their two year theme of "Think Do Succeed." They 
kicked off the Fall by partnering their Green Team with National Grid. West Elementary School 
had been selected as one of a handful of schools to participate in National Grid's "Power to Save" 
regional school tour, an innovative, energy-efficiency education effort. They hosted a Green 
Night and had over 700 attendees. Six Power to Save posters winners were selected and 
recognized in Boston for their energy saving masterpieces. Technology and twenty-first century 
learning skills continued to be a primary focus for West Elementary. The faculty and parent 
community worked hard to garner funding to purchase six additional SMARTboards for the 
school. Three West Elementary faculty members taught a SMARTBOARD class for sixty 
elementary through high school Andover teachers. West has expanded their enrichment offerings 
to include: math leagues from grade 2 through 5, Flag Football, Chess, School Newspaper, 
Gymnastics, Non-Fiction Book Club, Recycling club, Floor Hockey, Grade 3 chorus, Friday Fun 
Fest, Web 2.0, and Student Council. In addition, all fifth graders hold one or more jobs during 
their final year of elementary school. Some of those jobs are: office worker, tour guide, courtyard 
maintenance, school store, and special friends (to our special needs classrooms). West added a 
special needs preschool to its mix this year and enjoyed having Andover' s youngest learners as 
part of their community. The student council continued to reach out and make connections with 
the community. The monthly Walk to School Day supported a different charity each month. 
West was able to raise several thousand for the Beverly School in Kenya, and members of the 
student council traveled to Holy Cross to receive leadership plaques for their efforts. The West 
community also raised $3,000 for the Youth Center. The student council was inducted as junior 
members of Rotary in a program entitled Early Act. The adults Rotarians have joined forces with 
our Early Actors in many charity events. In addition, West has grown its volunteer program to 
include not only senior citizens, but middle school students. A new program was started called 



West to West, where one day a week twenty West Middle School students come to West to tutor 
students in grades one to five. 

DISTRICT DEPARTMENTS 
Pupil Personnel Department 

Pupil Personnel Administration has continued to oversee special education services to 
approximately 1000 identified students between the ages of 3 and 22. Programs were available 
to address the needs of students with mild to moderate disabilities, as well as those with more 
intensive special needs and multiple handicaps. To the extent possible, special education 
students attended their neighborhood schools and participated with their typically developing 
peers in the general education setting. 

The Department continued its commitment to work with families to retain students in the district 
(rather than sending them to out-of-district programs), and provided consultation, training, and 
support to in-district staff in order to meet the complex needs of some of our students. The 
ARRA IDEA stimulus monies have been used to support the district's newest programs and their 
students, including: 1) the EXCEL program at West Middle School, serving students with global 
delays, providing access to the general education curriculum and academics, as well as 
functional academics and life skills for those students who require them; 2) the Doherty Middle 
School LBA (Language-Based Access) program, serving students with language-based learning 
disabilities who require extensive curriculum modifications and language remediation in order to 
maintain effective progress; 3) the West Elementary Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) program, 
supporting students with autism using highly structured and individualized data-driven 
methodologies; and 4) Andover High School pre-vocational/ vocational program, supporting 
students with intensive needs at the high school through pre-vocational training and actual job 
placement and job coaching for those students in a supported work environment. The Early 
Childhood stimulus grant was used to fund a new teacher and assistant for a new preschool class 
that opened in January 2010. 

In addition to supporting our special needs students, the Pupil Personnel Department also 
continues to oversee programs for educating English Language Learners (ELLs), and has made 
significant progress in providing state-mandated training for general education staff so that they 
can meet the needs of ELLs in their classrooms. Early in January, the Department of Elementary 
and Secondary Education (DESE) notified the district that its English Learner Education 
corrective actions (stemming from the Coordinated Program Review conducted by the 
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education in the 2007-08 school year) are now 
complete. 

Health Education 

The Andover Health Education Department provides health education to students in middle 
school and high school. The curriculum is designed to increase each student's mental, physical, 
emotional and social well being. Health Education teachers align the curriculum with the 
Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Curriculum Frameworks instituting the sequential and 
coordinated teaching of health. Health teachers administered the Center for Disease Control 
Youth Risk Behavior Survey to students in grades 9 and 11 this year. Behaviors related to 
tobacco, alcohol and illegal drug use, diet, exercise, violence and mental issues were reported. 
Community network teams such as Andover' s Community Health Advisory Team met to build 
safe schools. Student groups such as Kids for Kids, Peer Leadership and Student's Against 
Destructive Decisions taught students to take an active role as models for positive health 
decisions. The Parent to Parent speaker series had an established program of speakers that 
directly tied to curriculum initiatives. The Health Education Department teamed with the 



Samaritans of the Merrimack Valley and made an in-depth presentation at a monthly high school 
faculty meeting on mental and emotional health and teen suicide. 

Technology 

The Andover Public Schools' Technology Department continues to strive to meet our goal of 
enhancing student learning with the application of technology to assist our students with 
accessing, collecting, authenticating, managing, assessing, and analyzing information effectively 
and ethically. Currently, we support 7160 users that access 2278 networked desktop and laptop 
computers, the Plant & Facilities Department video security and entry system and the HVAC 
monitoring systems, and the enterprise size infrastructure that is necessary to support our clients. 

The Technology FY2010 operating budget was cut 49.1 % and the capital improvement budget 
was cut 66%. These reductions have severely limited the Technology Department's ability to 
support users, maintain equipment and software and replace 8 & 9 year old computers and 
printers. As a result of the budget cuts, we have been forced to eliminate 4.8 Elementary 
Instructional Technology Specialist positions and 1 Technology Associate support position in the 
Central Office. With the remaining CIP funds we were able to, through a three year lease 
purchase, replace 1 80 -8 year old laptop computers at Wood Hill Middle School and High Plain 
Elementary School. 

The School Committee has also begun a Strategic Planning Process which will refocus the 
district's technology initiative. In addition, the School Department and the Town have engaged a 
consultant to review the School District and Town IT systems and organizations to see if there 
are any ways to decrease costs, consolidate operations, and increase efficiencies. 

Physical Education Department 

The Physical Education Department was one of seventy-six recipients nationwide of a Carol M. 
White Physical Education Program grant from the United States Department of Education. This 
grant will bring in approximately $780,000 over a three year period to provide services, 
programs and equipment to help all students, K-12, increase their participation in moderate to 
vigorous physical activity on a regular basis. Our K-12 Physical Education teachers work to 
instill in their students an understanding of the importance of physical fitness and activity and the 
critical role these play in their overall lifetime health and well-being. Implementing a 
comprehensive curriculum that is based on the National Association for Sport and Physical 
Education standards, as well as the Massachusetts Health Curriculum frameworks, our Physical 
Education teachers taught students a wide variety of movement concepts, health related 
components and skill related components of physical fitness, sports skills, and activities that 
promote a healthy and active lifestyle. The Department has expanded intramural programs, has 
teamed with the YMCA to run a learn to swim program, and has run Jump Rope for Heart and 
Hoops for Heart programs at our elementary schools. The ever popular 4 th and 5 th grade cross 
country run and track and field meet as well as the middle school cross country run were also 
held this year. 

Athletic Department 

The Athletic Department is committed to the philosophy that participants are students first and 
athletes second. Interscholastic athletics is a co-curricular activity that serves as an extension of 
the academic classroom. It is a place where teachers are truly teaching what they want to teach 
to students who are truly learning what they want to learn. The educational experiences of all 
individuals participating are enhanced through the learning of the values of healthy competition, 
teamwork, goal setting, respect, and hard work X)ver fifteen hundred roster spots were filled by 
student-athletes who took advantage of the opportunities for learning through the athletic 



program during the 2009 year. Andover was recognized as the fourth best program in the 
prestigious Dalton Award recognitions by The Boston Globe. The Dalton Award is awarded the 
combined boys and girls winning percentage for 2009. The Boys Indoor Track team and the 
Boys Outdoor Track team were the Division I and the All State Champions in 2009. The Girls 
Swim team earned the Massachusetts State Division I Championship as well. The following 
teams earned Merrimack Valley Conference Championships in 2009; Boys Swimming, Girls 
Basketball, Boys Skiing, Girls Gymnastics, Boys Tennis, Girls Tennis, Boys Lacrosse, Girls 
Lacrosse, Boys Volleyball, Boys Cross Country, Girls Swimming, and Field Hockey. 



On behalf of students, parents and staff, I thank the town of Andover for its ongoing support of 
our schools. This is support that continues to ensure that Andover is a place where people want 
to live, to work, and to raise a family. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Dr. Claudia L. Bach 
Superintendent of Schools 



102 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



Greater Lawrence Technical School is a regional vocational secondary institution with a 
campus in West Andover encompassing twenty-six acres. The school educates students from 
Andover, Lawrence, Methuen and North Andover and, in addition, accepts qualified students 
from other communities through the school choice program. There are currently thirty-two 
underclassmen from Andover attending the school and fourteen employees of Greater Lawrence 
Tech reside in Andover. 

Greater Lawrence Technical School is accredited by the New England Association of 
Schools and Colleges. In 2009, sixty-two percent of the senior class went on to continue their 
education in either a four or two year college following graduation while the remaining students 
combined either college with full-time employment or made a direct impact on the workforce of 
the Merrimack Valley. College-bound graduates increased twenty-one percent versus the 
graduating class of 2007 (41%). 

The fifteen career opportunities offered to students through a five-academy model 
include Allied Health, Automotive Collision Repair, Automotive Technology, Biotechnology, 
Carpentry, Culinary Arts, Cosmetology, Electricity, Electronics & Pre-Engineering, Fashion 
Technology, Graphic Communication, Information Support Services & Networking, Marketing, 
Metal Fabrication & Joining Technologies, Office Technologies and Plumbing. Our Technical 
School has been one of the pioneers in the state regarding the successful academy model. 
Beginning in 2010, Greater Lawrence Technical School will be adding four additional career 
areas: Dental Assisting, Barbering, HVAC, and Radio & Television. 

Greater Lawrence Technical School prepares students for lifetime employment through 
nationally and state recognized licensure and certification programs including; Building 
Supervisors License, State Cosmetology, NATEF, ASE, Refrigerant Recovery and Recycling 
License, CareerSafe, SP2, Mass I/M Certification and License, American Culinary Federation 
License, ServSafe, State Board of Electricians, OSHA Safety Certification, Print Ed 
Certification, Art Collaborative, Graphic Arts Education and Research Foundation, CPR, First 
Aid, CNA, EKG Technician License, Home Health Aide, NCCAP, Paid Feeders Program, A+, 
Cat.5, Cisco, Hilti Certification, State Board of Plumbing, Water Pex & Trac Piping 
Certification, and Gastite Certification. The Cooperative Education component of Greater 
Lawrence Technical School allows students to use their knowledge and skills at worksites in the 
Merrimack Valley which include many employers in Andover. 

While the school continues to be a community of learners dedicated to service and 
excellence, Greater Lawrence Technical School maintains its mantra "Reggies Moving Up". 
This has been reflected in the improvement in MCAS scores, the phenomenal success of the 
athletic teams and the continued medal winning prowess of both DECA and SKILLS/USA on 
both the State and National level. Greater Lawrence Technical School is extremely proud of its 
twenty-seven Abigail and John Adams Scholarship winners. 



103 



Residents of Andover have benefitted from many of the consumer friendly services 
offered to the public through our technical programs. At Greater Lawrence Technical School, 
residents have had their cars repaired, received a haircut, enjoyed lunch in one of our two 
restaurants, had brochures printed, and countless other things which have made life easier for 
townspeople each day. In addition, the residents of Andover continue to use the school facility 
by way of enrollment in classes offered through Community and Youth Services and athletic 
venues for both youth and varsity sports teams, which include the swimming pool, gymnasiums 
and fields. Greater Lawrence Technical School continues to be the site for most Andover teens 
receiving their Lifeguarding and Water Safety certifications. More than sixty Andover groups 
and individuals have utilized the rental option created by The District Committee. 

This year, Greater Lawrence Technical School began offering Night School to the 
Greater Lawrence community. Night School began on September 8, 2009. Classes offered 
include Computer Applications, GED, Spanish, English, Trade and Technical, Fitness, CPR, 
ServSafe, Cooking and Crafts. We offered 43 classes and had 25 participants in four classes. 
The Spring 2010 semester increased class offerings to 53 classes and currently is host to 203 
participants. This program is currently funded with ARRA Stimulus Funds, with the intent to 
become self-sustaining within two years. 

Greater Lawrence Technical School continues to enjoy a close working relationship with 
the Andover Police Department. Since the 2007 - 2008 School Year, an Andover patrolman has 
been employed by the District as a School Resource Officer. His presence during the school day, 
and at after-school and sporting events, has had a positive impact on the entire school 
community. 

The Greater Lawrence Technical School District Committee is made up of seven 
members from the four sending communities of Andover, Lawrence, Methuen and North 
Andover. In addition to representation on the District Committee, Andover is also represented 
by a resident on both the school's Advisory Board and The School Council. District Committee 
representation is determined by the number of students attending from that community. 

Name City/Town Term Expires 

Marilyn Fitzgerald Andover 201 1 

Leo J. Lamontagne Lawrence 2011 

Richard A. Hamilton, JR. Lawrence 201 1 

Pamela J. Neilon Lawrence 2011 

Erica Max Methuen 2011 

Thomas Grondine Methuen 2011 

John M. Driscoll North Andover 2011 



104 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June 1948. Monthly meetings are held 
on the third Thursday of every month at the Stowe Court Community Room, 1 00 Morton Street, 
except during January, May and October when meetings are held at the Frye Circle Com. Room 
at 256 North Main Street. Board members and the Executive Director are as follows: 

James Cuticchia - Chairman Calvin Deyermond - Vice Chairman 

Francis O'Connor-Treasurer Daniel T. Grams - Assistant Treasurer 

Janice Burkholder - Member Christine Poschen-Metzemaekers - Ex. Director 

The Andover Housing Authority has thirty-three buildings on six different sites 
comprised of 218 units of State-aided housing for elder/disabled people on Chestnut Court, 
Grandview Terrace, Frye Circle and Stowe Court. There are 56 units of family housing in 
Memorial Circle. In addition, the AHA owns one house under the Mass. Chapter 689 program 
for developmentally disabled adults and administers four Alternative Housing Vouchers under 
the Massachusetts (AHVP) leased housing program for a total of 286 State units. 

State-funded Programs - Income Limits are as follows: 

1 person -$43,050 3 people -$55,350 5 people - $66,400 7 people - $76,250 

2 people - $49,200 4 people- $61,500 6 people- $71,350 8 people- $81,200 

Apartment Turnover 

Elder/Disabled Program - 16 Units (7%) Average Rent: $320 including all utilities 

Family Program - 4 units (7%) Average Rent: $447 including all utilities 

(including transfers to larger or smaller units and reasonable accommodations) 

State-funded Grants - Capital Improvements 

Grandview Terrace - Boilers - $30,000 (complete) 

Memorial Circle - HC Renovation - $327,687 (in process) 
■ Frye Circle - Hallway windows and doors replacement - $327,687 (in process) 
• Chestnut Court - Roof - $8 1 ,250 (complete) 

Chestnut Court - Electric transformer repairs - $ 1 2,7 1 (in process) 

State-funded Grant - New Horizons For Youth Program 

An after school homework program for Memorial Circle children funded through the Andover 
Police Department under the Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement 
Assistance Program. 

Federally-funded Programs 

The AHA administers 127 vouchers under the Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program 

through HUD. Section 8 income limits are as follows: 

1 person -$29,700 3 people- $38,150 5 people -$45,800 7 people - $52,600 

2 people -$33,900 4 people - $42,400 6 people - $49,200 8 people -$55,950 



105 



COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 

The mission of the Andover Commission on Disability is to address Andover 's needs for 
the town, its residents, visitors, friends, employers and families relative to disability. The 
Andover Commission on Disability is a commission of nine volunteers serving three-year terms 
and appointed by the Board of Selectmen to advocate on disability-related issues. The majority 
of the Commission members must be disabled or directly related to disability. 

The goals of the Commission are: 

To advocate for the full integration and participation of people with disabilities in the 

Town of Andover. 

To research the needs and problems of people with disabilities in the Town of Andover. 

To advise and assist Town officials and employees in addressing the needs of people with 

disabilities. 

To participate to the maximum extent possible in disability-related programs of a local, 

regional, State and Federal nature. 

To support training related to disability to people who reside or work in the Town of 

Andover. 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

In 2009, the Commission's areas of concentration were: 

1 . Project Lifesaver - A search and rescue project with the Andover Police Department 

2. Access Projects - The Main Street Improvement Project, Park & Barnard Streets 
Project 

3. Kids on the Block - Education 

4. Playground Project - Ballardvale Playground Proposal 

5. Senior Center Community Garden 

6. Handicap Parking Program 

7. Information Resource on disability issues 

PROJECT LIFESAVER 

Project Lifesaver continues to be a priority for the Andover Commission on Disability. 
The Commission originally sponsored the equipment and education of police officers for this 
search and rescue program for people who wander from safety. This program is available to all 
residents regardless of their ability to pay. The Commission has an ongoing sub-committee 
working with the Andover Police Department. Currently, the program has an enrollment of 10 
families. Our main thrust continues to be outreach into the community to create an overall 
awareness of the program within Andover and surrounding communities 

ACCESS PROJECTS 

The Main Street Improvement Project 



106 



In June, two staff members from the Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD) reviewed 
the ongoing project from Main Street at the Old Town Hall to Lewis Street. Accompanying 
them were the Town's Senior Planner and three members from the Disability Commission. They 
found four items of concern. At their next visit in September, the MOD staff members walked 
Main Street from Old Town Hall to Harding/Stevens Streets with the Town's Senior Planner, the 
Town Engineer, the Project Engineer and three Commission members. There were seven items 
of concern. All items of concern were addressed prior to the completion of the project in the 
Fall. In November, Meg Robertson, Director Orientation & Mobility Department, Massachusetts 
Commission for the Blind (MCB) and two Commission members reviewed the Audible 
Pedestrian Signals in Elm Square and at Main and Chestnut Streets. 

The Park and Barnard Streets Project 

While continuing to advocate for accessibility improvements to the Main Street 
businesses that the Access Sub-Committee had studied, the Commission is reviewing the 
entrances and navigation within businesses on Park and Barnard Streets. The study will be 
completed in early 2010. Findings will be sent to both business owners and their property 
owners who are jointly responsible to provide access to handicapped residents as mandated by 
the Americans with Disabfffl ilities Act of 1990. The findings will also be shared with the 
Town's Planners and the Andover Business Center Association (ABCA). 

KIDS ON THE BLOCK 

The Commission is delighted to sponsor the initiation of the KOB (Kids on The Block) 
Autism Program in Andover. An educational program through puppeteers and plays, our 
selected program was on Autism. The local chapter of Best Buddies, a program within the 
Doherty Middle School, will champion this program following through on training and 
presentations. In our constant quest to create disability awareness in our community, the 
Commission will provide a consultative role and monetary support for this important Disability 
Awareness Program. 

The Kids on the Block, a troupe of educational puppets, are life-sized and act and look 
like real kids. This program is part of a successful education program that teaches children about 
real-life topics, such as prejudice, differences, disabilities, diversity and other social concerns. 
Kids on the Block presentations consist of powerful and attention-getting scripts with question 
and answer sessions that help keep children interested as well as involved along with interactive 
simulations for students to experience different challenges. The Kids on the Block Program 
encourages children to learn positive attitudes toward others and to increase awareness, 
sensitivity and acceptance of all differences. The initial performance is planned for Spring 2010 
at a local elementary school. 

PLAYGROUND PROJECT 

Ballardvale Playground Project Proposal 

This year, the Commission worked with the Ballardvale Historic District Commission to 
include improved accessibility as part of the Ballardvale playground proposal currently in the 
planning stages. The Commission's recommendations included: accessible parking, wheelchair 

107 



access into the playground, a hard- surfaced path wide enough to accommodate wheelchair access 
to all of the equipment, specialized play equipment, wheelchair accessible picnic tables and 
overall compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. 

The Commission joined local residents in proposing additions and suggestions for 
playground improvements such as the creation of new parking, closure of holes in the fence 
running parallel to the train tracks, a possible skateboard surface, the addition of more play 
equipment for toddlers, a horizontal slide, a wooden climbing structure, and a space for ice 
skating in the winter. A circular path could be considered for an all-age and all-ability walking 
path of the two acre playground. Considerable re-sloping of the terrain would be involved. 
Improving the accessibility of the Town's playgrounds is a multi-year continuing effort with the 
Plant & Facilities Department. 

SENIOR CENTER COMMUNITY GARDEN 

With encouragement from the Andover Community Garden Steering Committee, the 
Commission is the initial sponsor of an organic vegetable garden at the Senior Center. Often 
called "horticultural therapy", planning, planting, tending and harvesting a garden is a healthful 
and creative activity. The garden has been designed to the requirements of the Americans with 
Disabilities Act (ADA) in order to provide safe and comfortable gardening experiences. 

Staff from the Plant and Facilities Department leveled and surfaced the site with crushed 
stone making it wheelchair accessible. The beautiful and accessible planting beds were 
professionally constructed by a hard-working crew from the Youth Services Division. The 
garden consists of two raised 4'xlO' planting beds with a height of 31 inches which can be 
worked by standing or sitting volunteer gardeners. There is accessible passage through the 
garden pathways for people using wheelchairs or walkers. There is also a 24 'x2' bed for trellises 
to hold climbing vegetables such as string beans, cucumbers, squash, zucchini, peas, etc. The 
produce derived from the garden will go directly to the Senior Center for their daily luncheons 
and grill nights on the terrace. The Commission is proud of this partnership with Town 
departments and volunteers and has committed to a grant in support of the garden for two years. 

HANDICAP PARKING PROGRAM 

This on-going ticketing program consists of photographing vehicles parked illegally in 
official handicap parking spaces in Andover. Such parking violations are documented on special 
forms and submitted with the photos of the vehicle to the Andover Police Department. Citations 
are then issued for the violations. The program's intent is to support the Police Department and 
to help protect the rights of the handicapped. 

INFORMATION RESOURCE 

The Commission publishes a newsletter twice a year. The newsletter is available at 
various locations including the Town Offices, Senior Center, Old Town Hall, Memorial Hall 
Library, Public Safety Center and on the Commission's web site 
http://andoverma.gov/boards/disability . It is intended to inform residents of programs and 
services for the disabled, the activities and efforts of the Commission as well as areas of concern 
needing advocacy. 

108 



PRESERVATION COMMISSION 

The Andover Preservation Commission endeavors to fulfill its mission to advise the Town 
concerning the preservation of its historic and archeological resources and has been active in 
the following areas: 



DEMOLITION DELAY BYLAW 

The Preservation Commission heard demolition requests for nine properties this year and 
imposed delays of to 12 months. Six structures were deemed historically significant. Four 
buildings currently await demolition. Three buildings were found not to be historically 
significant and were razed. One structure was razed without the proper permit or review. 

REVIEW OF PLANS 

Twenty applications were submitted to be reviewed for historic design compatibility. 
Nine of those applications required no formal review. 

DIMENSIONAL SPECIAL PERMIT/HISTORIC PRESERVATION 

Six requests were submitted for review - five projects have been approved for referral to 
the Zoning Board of Appeals for action. 

LOCAL HISTORIC DISTRICT - Leo Greene, Preservation Commission representative 

The Andover Preservation Commission and the Ballardvale Historic District Commission 
work cooperatively on issues of mutual interest. 

DESIGN REVIEW BOARD - Craig Gibson, Preservation Commission representative 

The Commission remains vitally interested in the historic buildings and character of the 
downtown and Main Street corridor to Rt. 495. Mr. Gibson is also the Commission's 
representative to the Town Yard Task Force. 

WEST PARISH GARDEN CEMETERY COMMITTEE - Jim Batchelder, Preservation 
Commission representative. 

See www.westparishgardencemetery.org for more information. 

HERITAGE EDUCATION/PRESERVATION AWARDS 

The 19 th Annual Andover Preservation Awards were held in May of 2009 at Memorial 
Hall Library in cooperation with the Andover Historical Society and the Ballardvale Historic 
District Commission to recognize outstanding examples of historic preservation in the 
community. Nine property owners received recognition for their efforts. Special recognition was 
given to the West Parish Garden Cemetery in celebration of its 100 th Anniversary, 1909-2009, 

109 



and the West Parish Garden Cemetery Committee for their continuing care of this beautiful 
landscape, historic burial ground and buildings. 

PROJECTS OF NOTE 

■ Historic Building Survey Project - www, mhl. org/historicpreservation/ 

The historic preservation website is a digitized version of the general survey of Andover's 
historic buildings from the late 1 7th century through the early 20th century. The website, 
hosted by Memorial Hall Library, allows researchers and Town departments internet 
access to this information as well as maps of the Town's historic districts, information on 
house renovation and links to other resources. As a work in progress, it will be modified 
as new information becomes available. Phase 2 of this project will broaden the survey to 
include appropriate 20* century buildings. 

Wood Park 

The Wood Park Memorial was completed and dedicated in December of 2009. 

■ Preservation Restrictions 

The Commission continues to develop goals and pursue opportunities to better preserve 
our historic resources. Preservation restrictions are an approval requirement of the 
Dimensional Special Permit for Historic Preservation. The Commission encourages 
individual homeowners to consider preservation restrictions or easements for the 
protection of their historic properties. 

Historic Restoration/Rehabilitation Information 

Acting in its advisory capacity, the Commission is developing and offering educational 
materials to the public. These resources help individual building owners understand the 
meaning of historic preservation, instructs them on the selection of appropriate materials 
and directs them to appropriate alternatives when cost is an issue. As always, the 
Commission is willing to advise building owners on their historic preservation projects. 
Commission member Jim Batchelder is researching and designing detailed maps for all 
seven National Register Historic Districts. All new information will be available on the 
website. 

Long-time members Dennis Ingram, Lynn Smiledge and Norma Gammon retired from 
the Commission during 2009. The Commission thanks them for their many contributions and 
years of service to the Town of Andover and the Preservation Commission. 



110 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long-time resident of Andover, 
bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a 
permanent trust fund. This trust is now known as the Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle 
stipulated in her will that the income from this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement 
of assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, 
comfort or support on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance 
with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases are referred to the Trustees by private charitable 
groups and organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

During 2009, the Trustees acted on thirteen cases, disbursing $1 8,587.36. Only the income 
of the Fund is available. The principal of $345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current 
income are invested under the direction of the Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town 
Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 2008 $85,587.36 

Receipts - 2009 18,744.17 

$104,331.53 

Disbursements - 2009 12,776.82 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31,2009 $ 91,554.71 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 

The John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund was established by Article 17 of the 1893 Annual 
Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the needy and poor to 
purchase wood or coal. In 1995 the trust documents were modified by the Probate Court of 
Massachusetts to permit the use of all types of fuel for heating, cooking or electrical purposes. Three 
Trustees, with staggered terms approved by vote at the Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 
The Trustees approved six applications during the year. 



Balance on hand 6/30/08 $51,365.15 

Income - FY-2009 2,456.79 

Expenditures - FY-2009 2,250.00 

Balance as of 6/3 0/09 $51,571.94 



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53 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

TRUST-CEMETERY -SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2009 



FUND 



PRINCIPAL 



BALANCE 
July 1 , 2008 



DEPOSITS 



OTHER 



INCOME 



DRAWN 



BALANCE 
June 30, 2009 



STABILIZATION 
CD. WOOD 
ESTATE S.P. WHITE 
POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 
TOWN 400TH CELEBRATION 



5,766.63 



J. GREELEY 


5,000.00 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


345,825.50 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 




JOHN CORNELL 


5,000.00 


DAVID & LUCY SHAW 


10,000.00 


W.L. RAYMOND 


7,845.81 


A.J. LINCOLN 


5,000.00 


E.I. RAYMOND 


1,500.00 


TAYLOR 


300.00 


SPRING GROVE 


932,825.77 


SPRING GROVE FLOWERS 





EMILINE LINCOLN 
EMMA J. LINCOLN 



1,000.00 



CONSERVATION FUND 




SMART 


1 ,000.00 


FARRINGTON 


600.00 


BALLARDVALE 


532.88 


ALLEN 


200.00 


EMS BELL LIBRARY TRUST 


45,000.00 


ELDERLY TAXATION FUND 




MUNICIPAL AFFORDABLE HOUSING 




DRAPER 


1,058.93 


RICHARDSON 


1 ,000.00 


A & AV LINCOLN 


500.00 


RAFTON (INTEREST) 
RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 


598.50 


CONROY 


291.71 


AMERICAN LEGION 


200.00 


CHRIS MAYNARD BOOKS 


4,587.68 


HOLT 


81.95 



INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 

INSURANCE 

UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 
TOWN INSURANCE HEALTH 
WORKERS COMPENSATION 
TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 
GRAND TOTAL ALL TRUST FUNDS 



4,084,108.97 

1,167,560.37 

15,827.86 

31,773.10 

8,645.32 

7,144.41 

345,825.50 
92,751.07 

51,365.15 

46,303.25 

52,426.92 

23,213.70 

2,840.00 

2,007.81 

963,867.60 

35,421.75 

1 ,933.91 
1 ,059.47 

63,083.02 

15,064.67 

1 ,887.38 

1 ,357.79 

254.54 

58,518.23 

10,867.87 

7,506.95 

16,648.54 

1 ,459.93 

1,100.41 

598.50 
4,212.34 

1 ,691 .37 

1,247.16 

4,821.27 

758.50 



7,125,154.63 

120,764.80 
192,372.65 
541,755.33 
177,188.41 



1 ,797.36 



3.39 



20,278.00 



240.00 



22,318.75 

110,585.00 

100,000.00 

15,579,748.70 

84,672.00 



0.00 



195,461.02 




56,556.18 




324.02 




49.64 


10,517.15 


416.59 




345.48 




21,761.49 


24,868.28 


2,456.79 


2,250.00 


2,232.49 




2,528.33 




475.20 




136.92 




96.82 




1 ,460.47 


45,000.00 


1 ,709.83 


1 ,475.00 


93.23 




51.09 




3,041.55 




726.37 


15.00 


91.00 


15.00 


65.50 


25.00 


12.30 


15.00 


2,752.22 


2,854.52 


1 ,759.32 




469.83 




802.71 


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73.22 




52.67 




206.67 




81.55 




60.13 




224.15 


405.25 


36.57 




296,611.35 


87,440.20 


2,530.18 


69.573.00 


4,868.19 


72,166.29 


3,403.66 


15,838.521.36 




142,081.00 



4,279,569.99 

1,224,116.55 

16,151.88 

23,102.95 

9,061.91 

7,489.89 

345,825.50 
89,647.67 

51,571.94 

48,535.74 

54,955.25 

23,688.90 

2,976.92 

2,104.63 

940,606.07 

35,656.58 

2,027.14 
1,110.56 

66,124.57 

15,776.04 

1,963.38 

1,398.29 

251.84 

58,415.93 

12,627.19 

7,976.78 

17,451.25 

1,533.15 

1,153.08 

598.50 
4,659.01 

1,772.92 

1,307.29 

4.640.17 

795.07 



7,356.644.53 

164,306.98 
225,074.55 
286,386.33 
119,779.41 



1,032,081.19 


15,875,005.70 


0.00 


10,802.03 


16,122,341.65 


795,547.27 


8,157,235.82 


15,897,324.45 


0.00 


307,413.38 


16,209,781.85 


8,152,191.80 



126 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF BONDS AUTHORIZED AND OUTSTANDING 

JUNE 30, 2009 



ART 10-1 2002 
ART 1 1 2002 



PROJECT NAME 

EXEMPT DEPT 

PUBLIC SAFETY CENTER (ADD'L FUNDING) (1) 
NEW SCHOOL ADDITIONAL FUNDING 
TOTAL EXEMPT 













BANS 


AUTHORIZATION 


NEW 


BONDING 


TM CLOSEOUT 


AUTHORIZATION 


OUTSTANDING 


JULY 01. 2008 


AUTHORIZATION 






JUNE 30. 2009 


DUE 03/15/10 


500,000.00 




500,000.00 




0.00 




350,000.00 






350,000.00 


0.00 




850,000.00 


0.00 


600,000.00 


350,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 



SEWER ENTERPRISE 

ART 2A 2004 SOUTH MAIN AREA SEWERS 

ART 33 2006 REPAIR/REPLACEMENT SANITARY SEWER 

ART 36 2007 DASCOMB/OSGOOD SEWER 

ART 41 2007 KIRKLAND DRIVE SEWER 

ART 64 2007 SHAWSHEEN PUMPING STATION 

ART 33 2008 SHAWSHEEN RIVER OUTFALL SEWER 

ART 51 2008 SEWER MAIN CONSTRUCTION & RECONST 



1,000,000.00 
500,000.00 
200.000.00 
250,000.00 
750,000.00 

4,000,000.00 
500.000.00 



350,000.00 
200,000.00 
250,000.00 
200,000.00 
1.500.000.00 



1.000,000.00 

150,000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

550.000.00 

2,500,000.00 

500,000.00 



7,200.000.00 



2,500.000.00 



4,700,000.00 



WATER ENTERPRISE 

ART 34 2005 WATER TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVEMENTS 198,648.00 

ART 34 2005 WATER TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVEMENTS (WPAT) 634,71 7.00 

ART 41 2005 FISHBROOK PUMPING STATION 250,000.00 



1,083,365.00 



198,000.00 
634,717.00 



832,717.00 



648.00 
0.00 
0.00 



TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS 



8,283,365.00 



250,000.00 



4,700,648.00 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
LANDFILL CLOSURE 

ART 44 1999 LANDFILL CLOSURE 

ART 43 2006 LANDFILL CAP/LEDGE ROAD 

ART 31 2008 LAND FILL CLOSURE 



1.700.000.00 

500,000.00 

7,370,000.00 



1.700,000.00 

500.000.00 

7,370,000.00 



9,570,000.00 



SCHOOL 

ART 1 7 2006 SCHOOL ROOF REPLACEMENTS 

ART 1 5 2007 SCHOOL ROOF REPLACEMENT 

ART 28 2007 SCHOOL BUILDING MAINT/IMPROVE 

ART 24 2008 FEASIBILITY STUDY BANCROFT SCHOOL 

ART 27 2008 SCHOOL BUILDING RENOVATION 

ART 29 2008 LOVELY FIELD IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 56 2009 SCHOOL BLDG RENOVATION 

ART 59 2009 BANCROFT FEASIBILITY STUDY 



865.000.00 
2.980.000.00 
1,065.000.00 

300,000.00 
1,810,000.00 

240,000.00 



850,000.00 
525.000.00 



865,000.00 

1,480,000.00 

465,000.00 



240,000.00 



0.00 

1,500,000.00 

600,000.00 

300,000.00 

1,810,000.00 

0.00 

850,000.00 

525.000.00 



1.500,000.00 
300,000.00 
300,000.00 

1,000,000.00 



7,260,000.00 



5,585,000.00 



ART 74 1999 
ART 12 2001 
ART 48 2002 
ART 52 2007 
ART 32 2008 
ART 50 2008 



ROAD AND DRAINAGE 

MAIN STREET STREETSCAPE 

LAND ACQUISITION LOWELL JCT RD 

MAIN STREET IMPROVEMENTS 

BRIDGE REPAIRS 

BRIDGE REPAIRS 

STORM DRAINAGE CONSTRUCTION & IMP 



CONSERVATION AND LAND ACQUSITION 

CONSERVATION FUND 



224.000.00 
900,000.00 
269,500.00 
100,000.00 
600.000.00 



224,000.00 
900,000.00 
269,500.00 
100,000.00 
600,000.00 



380,000.00 




100.000.00 




280,000.00 


2,473,500.00 


0.00 


100.000.00 


0.00 


2,373,500.00 


400,000.00 








400,000 00 



224,000.00 
269.500.00 



ART 32 2004 
ART 27 2007 
ART 28 2008 
ART 48 2008 
ART 34 2009 
ART 35 2009 
ART 57 2009 
ART 58 2009 



TOWN BUILDINGS 

SENIOR CENTER PLANS 

TOWN BUILDING MAINT/IMPROVE 

TOWN BUILDING MAINTENANCE/RENOVATION 

RECREATION PARK BALLFIELD LIGHTING 

BALLARDVALE FIRE STATION STUDY 

TOWN BUILDING RENOVATION 

BLANCHARD ST BALLFIELDS 

VETERANS MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM 

MISCELLANEOUS 

FIRE PUMPER TRUCK/DPW TRUCKS 



TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
GRAND TOTAL 



30,000.00 
955.000.00 
290.000.00 
100,000.00 



100,000.00 
650,000.00 
425,000.00 
650,000.00 



255,000.00 
290,000.00 



30.000.00 



0.00 
700,000.00 

0.00 
100,000.00 
100,000.00 
650,000.00 
425,000.00 
650,000.00 



1.375,000.00 
973,000.00 


1,825,000.00 


545,000.00 


30,000.00 


2,625,000.00 
973.000.00 


973,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


973.000.00 


22,051,500.00 


3,200,000.00 


3,695,000.00 


30,000.00 


21,526,500.00 


31,184,865.00 


3,200,000.00 


7,527,717.00 


630,000.00 


26,227,148.00 



400,000.00 
100,000.00 



500.000.00 
973,000.00 



5,566,500.00 



5,566,500.00 



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130 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 3/24/2009 
PCT. 1 PCT. 2 PCT. 3 PCT. 4 PCT. 5 PCT. 6 PCT. 7 PCT. 8 PCT. 9 Totals 



MODERATOR (1) 






















SHEILA M DOHERTY 


302 


208 


308 


205 


190 


241 


284 


322 


295 


2355 


Blanks 


100 


59 


86 


74 


66 


68 


101 


114 


92 


760 


Misc. Others 


7 


3 


5 


3 


2 


3 


6 


5 


4 


38 


Totals 


409 


270 


399 


282 


258 


312 


391 


441 


391 


3153 


BD. OF SELECTMEN (2) 






















BRIAN P MAJOR 


229 


167 


234 


175 


171 


244 


268 


256 


259 


2003 


TED E TEICHERT 


234 


172 


261 


155 


142 


197 


197 


260 


237 


1855 


WILLIAMS E ENGLISH 


219 


117 


174 


126 


123 


99 


156 


196 


168 


1378 


Blanks 


135 


82 


127 


108 


80 


84 


161 


170 


115 


1062 


Misc. Others 


1 


2 


2 

















3 


8 


Totals 


818 


540 


798 


564 


516 


624 


782 


882 


782 


6306 


SCHOOL COMM. (2) 






















ARTHUR H BARBER 


125 


87 


119 


115 


86 


157 


208 


114 


132 


1143 


DAVID A BIRNBACH 


180 


125 


190 


128 


142 


160 


160 


182 


215 


1482 


PAULA COLBY-CLEMENT 


83 


69 


59 


64 


49 


50 


68 


68 


82 


592 


ANN W GILBERT 


256 


154 


240 


141 


127 


143 


161 


325 


208 


1755 


DIANE M MCCARRON 


43 


32 


61 


40 


28 


28 


32 


42 


45 


351 


Blanks 


130 


73 


128 


76 


84 


86 


153 


151 


100 


981 


Misc. Others 


1 





1 




















2 


Totals 


818 


540 


798 


564 


516 


624 


782 


882 


782 


6306 


HOUSING AUTH. (1) 






















JAMES A CUTICCHIA 


261 


185 


264 


167 


166 


211 


237 


279 


254 


2024 


Blanks 


148 


85 


135 


113 


92 


101 


152 


162 


137 


1125 


Misc. Others 











2 








2 








4 


Totals 


409 


270 


399 


282 


258 


312 


391 


441 


391 


3153 


REG.VOC.TECH.SCHL.(l) 




















GERALD H. SILVERMAN 


302 


214 


299 


192 


185 


233 


264 


313 


293 


2295 


Blanks 


107 


56 


98 


89 


73 


78 


125 


128 


98 


852 


Misc. Others 








2 


1 





1 


2 








6 


Totals 


409 


270 


399 


282 


258 


312 


391 


441 


391 


3153 


FREE SCHOOL TRUSTEES (5) 




















JOHN H ATCHISON, JR 


205 


136 


217 


124 


131 


164 


173 


218 


202 


1570 


EARL G EFFINGER 


208 


136 


211 


129 


128 


169 


171 


213 


202 


1567 


DONNA C ELLSWORTH 


210 


141 


217 


132 


133 


170 


180 


229 


213 


1625 


ERIC STUBENHAUS 


204 


131 


214 


131 


126 


170 


191 


214 


211 


1592 


DEBORAH K MOSKAL 


200 


135 


179 


115 


118 


151 


141 


201 


179 


1419 


Blanks 


1017 


671 


957 


777 


654 


735 


1098 


1129 


948 


7986 


Misc. Others 


1 








2 





1 


1 


1 





6 


Totals 


2045 


1350 


1995 


1410 


1290 


1560 


1955 


2205 


1955 


15765 



131 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - May 26. 27, 28 2009 



WARRANT 
ARTICLE NO. 

1 

2 
3 
4 



8 
9 

10 
11 

12 
13 
14 
15 

16 

17 

18 

19 



DESCRIPTION 

Election Results 

Election -Not Required by Ballot 

Salaries of Elected Officials 

FY2010 Budget 

- $132,806,219 

Capital Projects Fund FY-2010 
Appropriation $1,332,000 

Budget Transfers 

- $1,128,000 

Supplemental Budget Appropriations 

- $334,000 

Free Cash 

Unexpended Appropriations 

- $232,352.84 

Accumulated Employee Benefit Account 

Procurement - Special Legislation 

Punchard Free School Trustee - Special Legislation 

FAA Lease 

Transfer from Overlay Surplus 

Insurance Recovery Transfer 

- $110,585 

Town Yard Master Plan 

- $30,000 

5 Campanelli Drive - $27,255 

Right of First Refusal & Site Evaluation 

Site Evaluation for new Town Yard 

- $20,000 

Medicare Extension Plans for New Retirees 

Statute Acceptance 

132 



ACTION 
TAKEN 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 
Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 



ATT. GEN 
APPROVED 



WARRANT 
ARTICLE NO. 

20 

21 
22 



24 
25 
26 
27 
28 

29 

30 

31 

32 
33 

34 

35 
36 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - May 26, 27, 28 2009 
DESCRIPTION 



ACTION 
TAKEN 



Fireworks 
- $10,000 



Approved 



Transfer Funds from Stabilization Fund to School Dept. Withdrawn 

Appropriation for High School Athletics, Stabilization Fund Defeated 



General Housekeeping (a-f) 

a. Grant Program Authorization 

b. Road Contracts 

c. Town Report 

d. Property Tax Exemption - Statute Acceptance 

e. Contracts in Excess of Three Years 

f. Accepting Easements 

g. Rescinding of Bond Authorizations 

Granting Easements 

Unpaid Bills 

Chapter 90 Authorizations - Eminent Domain 

Revolving Accounts 

Elderly/Disabled Transportation Program 

- $12,000 

Water Main Construction/Reconstruction 

- $500,000 

Water System Supply Improvements 

- $250,000 

Sale/Lease of Town Land 

Essex Street - Grant of Easement 

Fire Rescue Ambulance 

- Bonding $225,000 

Ballardvale Fire Station Replacement 

- Bonding $100,000 



Approved 



Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Defeated 

Defeated 

Withdrawn 

Approved 



Watershed Protection Overlay District - ZBL Amendment Approved 



ATT. GEN 
APPROVED 



Sign ByLaw - ZBL Amendment 
Approved with amendment 



Approved 



Sept. 9, 2009 
Sept. 9, 2009 



133 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - May 26, 27, 28 2009 



WARRANT 
ARTICLE NO. 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 

47 
48 

49 

50 

51 
52 
53 

54 

55 



DESCRIPTION 



ACTION 
TAKEN 



Portable Signs - ZBL Amendment Approved 

Customary Home Occupation - ZBL Amendment Approved 

Additional Design Criteria - ZBL Amendment Approved 

Notification of Annual Property Taxes - GBL Amendment Defeated 

Five Year Projection - GBL Amendment Defeated 

Town & School Labor Contracts - GBL Amendment Defeated 



Accumulated Leave Benefits - GBL Amendment 

Payment of Sick Leave Benefits - GBL Amendment 

Stabilization Fund - Greater Lawrence Technical School 
Statute Acceptance 

Street Acceptances 

a) Barron Court 

b) Black Horse Lane 

United States Postal Service Lease at Town House 

Parking Program 

- $23,891 

Sewer Extension - Chester St, Mitton Cir, Oak St 

- Bonding $850,000 

Sidewalk Reconstruction - Sherboume St 

- Bonding $24,000 

Heffron Right-of-Way - Special Legislation 
Repairs to Private Ways - GBL Amendment 

Paving Pine Tree Lane 

- Bonding $25,000 

Repaving/Improve Foster Pond Rd & Pomeroy Rd 

- Bonding $50,000 

Town Building Maintenance & Renovation 

- Bonding $650,000 

134 



ATT. GEN 
APPROVED 

Sept. 9, 2009 

Sept. 9, 2009 

Sept. 9, 2009 



Defeated 
Defeated 
Approved 

Approved 

Approved 
Approved 

Withdrawn 

Defeated 

Approved 

Approved Jan. 14, 2010 

Withdrawn 

Withdrawn 

Approved 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - May 26, 27, 28 2009 



WARRANT 
ARTICLE NO. 

56 

57 

58 

59 

60 

61 
62 

63 
64 
65 

66 
67 
68 

69 

70 

71 



ACTION 
DESCRIPTION TAKEN 

School Building Maintenance & Renovation Approved 

- Bonding $850,000 

New Ballfields - Blanchard Street Approved 

- Bonding $425,000 

War Memorial Auditorium Repairs/Renovation Approved 

- Bonding $650,000 

Feasibility Study/Schematic Design-Bancroft Elementary Approved 

- Bonding $525,000 

Feasibility Study/Schematic Design-Bancroft Elementary Withdrawn 

- Bonding $320,000 

Increase Demand Charges for Delinquent Municipal Fees Approved 

Open Space Acquisition Withdrawn 

- Bonding $800,000 

Wireless Communication Facilities Moratorium-ZBL Amnd Withdrawn 



ATT. GEN 
APPROVED 



Wireless Communications - ZBL Amendment 

Water Treatment Plant Roof Replacement 
- Bonding $650,000 

Priority Development Sites - Statute Acceptance 

National Flood Insurance Program - ZBL Amendment 

Fun Flight Circle - Street Acceptance & Taking 
Eminent Domain 

Granli Drive Easements - Petition General Court 
Special Legislation 

West Hollow - Street Acceptance & Taking 
Eminent Domain 

Local Option Revenues - Statute Acceptance 



Approved Sept. 9, 2009 
Approved 

Approved 

Approved Sept. 9, 2009 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 



135 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on March 2, 2009, the Inhabitants of said Town 
who are qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated 
polling place. All nine precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, and 
Nine are to vote at the Collins Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said 
Andover, on 

TUESDAY, THE TWENTY-FOURTH OF MARCH, 2009 

at seven o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, 
have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes 
stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each 
school house and in no less than five other public places where bill and notices are usually 
posted and by publication in Andover Townsman. Said Warrants have been posted and 
published fourteen days. 

Ronald Bertheim 
Constable 
Annual Town Election 

ARTICLE 1. Results of the Annual Town Election on March 24, 2009: Moderator for one 
year, two Selectmen for three years, two School Committee members for three years, one 
member of the Andover Housing Authority for five years, one member of the Greater Lawrence 
Regional Vocational Technical School District Committee for three years and five members of 
the Punchard Free School Trustees for three years. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on April 15, 2009, the Inhabitants of said Town 
who are qualified to vote in Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated polling place. 
All nine precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, and Nine are to 
vote at the Collins Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

WEDNESDAY, THE TWENTY-SIXTH DAY OF MAY, 2009 

at seven o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, 
have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes 
stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each 
school house and in no less than five other public places where bill and notices are usually 
posted and by publication in Andover Townsman. Said Warrants have been posted and 
published fourteen days. 

Ronald Bertheim 
Constable 



136 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING May 26, 2009 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed one thousand eighty nine (1089) voters 
admitted to the meeting. 

Sheila M. Doherty, Moderator, called the meeting to order at 7:04 P.M. 

The American Legion Post 8 presented the posting of the Flag. 

The opening prayer was giving by the Reverend Doctor Edward Deyton, Ballardvale United 
Church, Clark Road, Andover. 

There was a moment of silence for the deceased that have worked and lived in the Town. 

The Salute to the flag was led by Ted E. Teichert, Chairman, Board of Selectmen. 

Megan Burke, a sophomore at Andover High School, sang the opening song "America", written 
by Samuel Francis Smith while he was living in the Town of Andover. 

Upon unanimous consent it was VOTED to admit eighty-five (85) non-voters to the meeting and 
escort non- voters to the non-voting section thereafter. The Moderator also recognized 
representatives from the Japanese Local Government Council that attended the meeting at the 
invitation of the Town Manager, Reginald R. Stapczynski. 

The Moderator took a vote to limit presenters of articles to five minutes of speaking time and 
speakers to three minutes. The motion passed by a Majority vote. 

The Moderator announced various housekeeping issues to the meeting members, including 
turning off cell phones, the order of speakers for the meeting, use of Pro and Con Microphones, 
the location of microphones, stage participants and the location of voting sections. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking, food or drinks (except water) in the 
Gymnasium. 

The Moderator introduced Arty. Christopher Vrountas as the Town Meeting "Ombudsman", and 
reminded meeting members that he would help them with questions on Town Meeting 
procedures and amendments to articles. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator 
refer to the warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectman for three years, one School 
Committee member for three years and one member of the Andover Housing Authority for five 
years and five Trustees of the Punchard Free School for three years. 



137 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - 1M\Y _t». 2~. 2S 2009 
The Town Clerk reported following were elected to office: 
loceraror One For One Year 

5:ar_ of Selec_ner: 7 ■ : ::: Taree Yens 



5:-; :1 J; 



--- - T 



■-— .a \ _•: 



Sheila M. Doherty 
9 Juniper Road* 
Brian P. Major 

11 Odyssey Way 

Ted E. Teichert 
5 Dufton Road 

David A. Bimbach 
86 Osgood Street 

.Ami W. Gilbert 

12 Grav Road 



_:e2:e: _avsTer.ce Regional 
• ;_ncnal Technical Schz z 
Disnic: 



One r :: .nree Years 



Gerald H. Silverman 

56 Dufton Road 



: : r~ 



Ir.e - :: rive Years 



James A. Cuticchia 
12" Greenwood Road 



Five For L_ree Years 



John H. AtchisoiL Jr. 

8 Sutherland Street 
Earl G. Efinger 

5 Iceland Road 
Donna C. Ellsworth 

8 Harvard Road 
Eric STubenhaus 

8 Enfield Drive 
Deborah K. Moskal 

176 Shawsheen Road 



Election Not Required bv Ballot 



ARTICLE 2. 



red bv law to be elected bv ballot, or take anv 



On recces: ::±e Tcw_ Clerl-: 

n motion mane arc rial; seczarer :: was YOTED by a \iajority vote that Elefterios (Ted) J. 
-man 11 Li" e :~ ?.:i:l. re ele::ei Tmsree zfrre i ; — ell Fund ::: ±ree "ears. 



salaries of Elected Officials 



.ARTICLE 



le elected officers for the ensuins vear or take anv 



Onrecraes* crude . rv.u Clerk 



seconded it was YOTED by a Nlajority vote that the salaries of the 



: i \ 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Town Moderator - $250.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and $60.00 for each 

Special Town Meeting except when it falls within the Annual 

Town Meeting. 
Selectmen - Chairman - $1 ,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 
School Committee - Chairman - $1 ,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 

The Town Clerk presided over the vote for the Moderator's salary. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

FY-2010 Budget 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the Town will 
raise and appropriate, including appropriations from available funds, to defray charges and 
expenses of the Town, including debt and interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for the 
Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 2009 and ending June 30, 2010, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

ARTICLE 4 - 2009 ANNUAL TOWN MEETIN G 

LINE 

ITEM DEPARTMENT APPROVED FY 2010 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
PUBLIC SAFETY by a Majority Vote: 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

1 PERSONAL SERVICES 12,938,024 

2 OTHER EXPENSES 1,273,112 
TOTAL 14,211,136 

Includes $276,163 - parking receipts, $75,000 - detail fees, and $1,035,000 - ambulance collections. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money for GENERAL GOVERNMENT by a Majority Vote: 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

3 PERSONAL SERVICES 3,990,278 

4 OTHER EXPENSES 1,426,688 
TOTAL 5,416,966 

Includes $6,000 in receipts from wetland filing fees. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money for PUBLIC WORKS by a Majority Vote: 
PUBLIC WORKS 

5 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,609,754 

6 OTHER EXPENSES 3.632,250 
TOTAL 5,242,004 

139 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money or PLANT AND FACILITIES by a Majority Vote: 
PLANT AND FACILITIES 

7 PERSONAL SERVICES 3,076,879 

8 OTHER EXPENSES 1,350.307 
TOTAL 4,427,186 

Includes $70,000 in rental receipts; $10,000 perpetual care income and $57,000 from cemetery fees. 
Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money for LIBRARY by a Majority Vote: 
LIBRARY 

9 PERSONAL SERVICES 2,052,489 

10 OTHER EXPENSES 564,900 
TOTAL 2,617,389 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money for COMMUNITY/YOUTH /ELDER SERVICES by a Majority Vote: 
COMMUNITY / YOUTH/ ELDER SERVICES 

1 1 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,176,448 

1 2 OTHER EXPENSES 452,794 
TOTAL 1,629,242 

Includes $544,127; $13,760; $61,632 in user fees and $66,544 in grants. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money for UNCLASSIFIED by a Majority Vote: 
UNCLASSIFIED 

13 COMPENSATION FUND 

14 RESERVE FUND 200,000 
TOTAL 200,000 

TOWN TOTAL 33,743,923 

less budgeted Revenues (2,215,226) 

NET TOTAL 31,528,697 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money for the ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT by a Majority Vote: 
ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPT 

15 PERSONAL SERVICES 47,484,553 

1 6 OTHER EXPENSES 12.948,605 
TOTAL 60,433,158 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend the School Depart line items 15 and 16 

to $59,933,157. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to close debate. 

VOTE: Declared More Than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator 

140 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

The Amendment was DISAPPROVED by a Majority vote. 

The original motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money for SEWER by a Majority Vote: 

SEWER 

17 PERSONAL SERVICES 406,828 

18 OTHER EXPENSES 1,938,253 
TOTAL 2,345,081 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money for WATER by a Majority Vote: 
WATER 

1 9 PERSONAL SERVICES 1 ,89 1 ,7 1 5 

20 OTHER EXPENSES 2,659,400 
TOTAL 4,551,115 

Includes $505,000 from Water reserves 

WATER AND SEWER TOTAL 6,896,196 

less budgeted Revenues - 505,000 

NET TOTAL 6,391,196 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money for FIXED COSTS by a Majority Vote: 
FIXED 

21 GR LAW TECH HS 494,553 

22 DEBT SERVICE 13,312,391 

23 GENERAL INSURANCE 640,500 

24 UNEMPLOYMENT COMP. 100,000 

25 RETIREMENT FUND 4,635,498 

26 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 12,550,000 
TOTAL 31,732,942 

GRAND TOTAL 132,806,219 

less budgeted Revenues (2,720,226) 

NET TOTAL 130,085,993 

Finance Committee Report: Approval with School Committee budget at $59,933,157 
Selectmen Report: Approval with School Committee budget at $5 9,93 3 , 1 5 7 

School Committee Report: Approval as moved and approved 



141 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Gerald H. Silverman, 56 Dufton Road, Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical School 
District School Committee, recognized Meghan Moynihan, 38 Mary Lou Lane, Andover, a 
senior at the Technical School, for her two year commitment as the student representative to the 
District Board and her outstanding service. 

ARTICLE 4 - 2009 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
SPECIAL ARTICLES 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - FREE CASH 

NONE 
SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM FREE CASH 

Article 7 Supplemental Appropriations- FY2009 School Department- 

Other Expenses 

TOTAL 
SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 

Article 6 From Article 4-2008-Debt Service 

From Article 4-2008-Town Reserve Fund 
From Article 4-2008-Public Safety-Other Expenses 
From Article 4-2008-Plant & Facilities-Other Expenses 
From Article 4-2008-Memorial Hall Library- 
Other Expenses 
From Article 4-FY2008-School-Other Expenses 
Form Article 8-FY2008-Capital Projects Fund 

TOTAL 



$334,000.00 

$334,000.00 

$208,000.00 

$155,000.00 

$16,000.00 

$27,000.00 

$49,000.00 

$140,000.00 

$533,000.00 

$1,128,000.00 



To Health Insurance-FY2009 

To Public Works-Personal Services-FY2009 

To Public Works-Other Expense-FY2009 



$500,000.00 

$149,000.00 

$479,000.00 

TOTAL $1,128,000.00 



Article 15 From Insurance Proceeds in Excess of $20,000 
to Municipal Building/Insurance Fund 



$110,585.00 



Article 16 From Article 32, 2004 Annual Town Meeting - Senior 
Center Plans to the Master Plan for the redevelopment 
of the existing Town Yard off Lewis St 



$30,000.00 



Article 17 From Article 5, 2005 Annual Town Meeting Capital $25,000.00 
Projects Fund 

From Article 32, 2004 Annual Town Meeting Senior Center $2,255.00 

TOTAL $27,255.00 

To provide for an option and acquire rights for 5 Campanelli $27,255.00 
Drive for the construction of a new Town Yard 



142 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Article 18 From Article 5, 2005 Annual Town Meeting - Capital $20,000.00 

Projects Fund to use for site evaluations for a new 
Town Yard 
Article 20 Transfer Funds from the Following Articles: 

Article 48, 1997 Annual Town Meeting - River Road Land $5,000.00 

Acquisition 
Article 2 1 , 2000 Annual Town Meeting - Senior Tax $2,000.00 

Voucher Program 
Article 36, 2002 Annual Town Meeting - Reassessment $3,000.00 

Program 

TOTAL $10,000.00 
to be appropriated to the Following: 
Fireworks program as part of the Fourth of July program $10,000.00 

Article 29 From Article 20, 2003 Annual Town Meeting -Water $100,000.00 

Treatment Plant Improvements 

From Article 47, 2004 Annual Town Meeting - Water $400,000.00 

Storage Tanks 

TOTAL $500,000.00 

To pay for costs of engineering, designing, constructing, $500,000.00 

reconstructing or replacing water mains 

Article 30 From Article 20, 2003 -Water Treatment Plant to $250,000.00 

pay costs of engineering, designing, replacing 
instrumentation and chemical feed systems 

Article 48 From Article 47, 2006 - Play and Display Shawsheen to $23,890.67 

Install and/or Replace Parking Meters. 

Article 65 From Article 20, 2003 - Water Treatment Plant $650,000.00 

to Water Treatment Plant Roof 



RESCIND BOND AUTHORIZATIONS 

Article 23G Article 1 1 , 2002 - New Schools Additional Funding 
Article 41, 2005 - Fishbrook Pumping Station 
Article 32, 2004 - Senior Center Plans 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - GENERAL FUND BORROWING 

Article 34 Ballardvale Fire Station Replacement 
Article 55 Town Building Maintenance and Renovation 
Article 56 School Building Maintenance and Renovation 
Article 57 New Ballfields- Blanchard Street 

143 



TOTAL 



$350,000.00 

$250,000.00 

$30,000.00 

$630,000.00 

$100,000.00 
$650,000.00 
$850,000.00 
$425,000.00 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Article 58 Memorial Auditorium Repairs and Renovations $650,000.00 

Article 59 Feasibility Study/Schematic Design - Bancroft Elementary $525,000.00 
School 

TOTAL $3,200,000.00 
SPECIAL ARTICLES - SEWER FUND BORROWING 

NONE 

UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS 

Article 9 Close out the following unexpended appropriations: 

Article 44, 1987 Annual Town Meeting - Elm Sq Traffic Signals $5,313.08 

Article 49, 1 997 Annual Town Meeting - Burtt Road $100.00 

Article 43, 1988 Annual Town Meeting - Dispatch Center $399.93 

Article 65, 1998 Annual Town Meeting -Traffic Signals $1,599.10 

Article 31,1 999 Annual Town Meeting - Senior Tax Voucher Program $4,000.00 

Article 98, 1 999 Annual Town Meeting - Ballardvale Signs $4,000.00 

* Article 2 1 ,2000 Annual Town Meeting - Senior Tax Voucher Program $2,000.00 

Article 5, 2004 Annual Town Meeting - Capital Projects Fund $1,538.91 

Article 5, 2005 Annual Town Meeting - Capital Projects Fund $3,620.15 

Article 5, 2006 Annual Town Meeting - Capital Projects Fund $80,912.69 

Article 5, 2007 Annual Town Meeting - Capital Projects Fund $128,868.98 

TOTAL $232,352.84 
*This closeout was not done because it was a duplicate of the funds 
in Article 20, Fireworks 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - CHAPTER 44 SEC. 53 1/2 REVOLVING ACCOUNTS 



Article 27 A Community Development and Planning Department 

Article 27 B Memorial Hall Library -Lost/Damaged Materials 

Article 27 C Health Clinic 

Article 27 D Division of Community Services 

Article 27 E Division of Youth Services 

Article 27 F Field Maintenance 

Article 27 G Division of Elder Services 

Article 27 H Public Safety Radio/ Antenna Frequency 

Article 20 I Memorial Hall Library Audio/Visual 

Article 27 J School Photocopy Center 

Article 27 K Compost Program 

Article 27 L Solid Waste 

Article 27 M Stormwater Management 

TOTAL 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM TAXATION 

Article 5 Capital Projects Fund FY 2010 

Article 28 Elderly/Disabled Transportation Program 



TOTAL 



$110,000.00 
$20,000.00 
$40,000.00 

$605,000.00 

$400,000.00 
$80,000.00 

$300,000.00 
$50,000.00 
$40,000.00 
$20,000.00 
$60,000.00 
$40,000.00 
$30,000.00 
$1,795,000.00 



$1,332,000.00 

$12,000.00 

$1,344,000.00 



144 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM WATER RESERVES 



NONE 


SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM SEWER RESERVES 


NONE 


SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM OVERLAY SURPLUS 


NONE 


SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM PARKING RECEIPTS 



NONE 

A true record 
ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 

FY-2010 Capital Projects Fund Appropriation 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$1,780,000 for the purpose of funding the Fiscal Year 2010 appropriation for the Capital Projects 
Fund or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 5 be 
approved as printed in the warrant in the amount of $1 ,332,000 from taxation. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Budget Transfers 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from amounts previously appropriated at 
the 2008 Annual Town Meeting as authorized by MGL Chapter 44, Section 33B, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer 
funds from the following 2008 Annual Town Meeting appropriations: 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27. 28 2009 

$208,000 from Article 4- Debt Service 

$155,000 from Article 4- Town Reserve Fund 

$ 16,000 from Article 4- Public Safety Other Expenses 

$ 27,000 from Article 4- Plant & Facilities Other Expenses 

$ 49,000 from Article 4- Memorial Hall Library Other Expenses 

$140,000 from Article 4- School Other Expenses 

$533,000 from Article 8- Capital Projects Fund 

And appropriate the sum of $500,000 for Health Insurance, $149,000 for Public Works-Personal 

Services and $479,000 for Public Works-Other Expense. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Supplemental Budget Appropriations 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to 
supplement appropriations voted at the April 2008 Annual Town Meeting, or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to transfer from free 
cash and appropriate a sum of $334,000 to supplement the FY2009 School Department-Other 
Expenses appropriation. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend the Supplemental Appropriation 
for out of district special education expenses for Fiscal Year 2009 by increasing the amount there 
of from $344,000 to $787,000, and to provide therefore that the full amount be transferred from 
Free Cash. 

The amendment was DEFEATED by a Majority vote 
The original motion was approved by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Free Cash 

ARTICLE 8. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use in free cash 
to reduce the Fiscal Year 2010 tax rate and to affect appropriations voted at the 2009 Annual 
Town Meeting, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 8 be WITHDRAWN by a 
Majority vote. 

Unexpended Appropriations 

146 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

ARTICLE 9. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations and free cash 
in the treasury, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded VOTED by a Majority vote that that the Town close-out 
the sum of $232,352.84 from the following unexpended appropriations: 

$ 5,313.08 Article 44,1987 Annual Town Meeting - Elm Sq Traffic Signals 

$ 100.00 Article 49,1997 Annual Town Meeting - Burtt Road 

$ 399.93 Article 43,1988 Annual Town Meeting - Dispatch Center 

$ 1,599.10 Article 65,1998 Annual Town Meeting -Traffic Signals 

$ 4,000.00 Article 31,1999 Annual Town Meeting - Senior Tax Voucher Program 

$ 4,000.00 Article 98,1999 Annual Town Meeting - Ballardvale Signs 

$ 2,000.00 Article 21, 2000 Annual Town Meeting - Senior Tax Voucher Program 

$ 1,538.91 Article 5, 2004 Annual Town Meeting - Capital Projects Fund 

$ 3,620.15 Article 5,2005 Annual Town Meeting - Capital Projects Fund 

$ 80,912.69 Article 5, 2006 Annual Town Meeting - Capital Projects Fund 

$128,868.98 Article 5,2007 Annual Town Meeting - Capital Projects Fund 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Accumulated Employee Benefit Account 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds and appropriate a sum not to exceed $350,000 to the Accumulated Employee Benefit 
Account for funding terminal leave liabilities upon being eligible for retirement under the 
Andover Contributory Retirement System and terminating employment with the Town, or take 
any action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 10 be WITHDRAWN by a 
Majority vote. 

Procurement - Petition to the General Court 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the General 
Court to enact Special Legislation as follows: 

"In the Town of Andover, every procurement for the construction, reconstruction, installation, 
demolition, maintenance or repair of any building by the Town estimated to cost less than $5,000 
shall be obtained through the exercise of sound business practices. The Town shall make and 
keep a record of each such procurement. Said record shall, at a minimum, include the name and 
address of the person from whom the services were procured. Written price quotations 
submitted in accordance with this subsection do not require bid deposits. 



147 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Every contract for the construction, reconstruction, installation, demolition, maintenance or 
repair of any building by the Town estimated to cost not less than $5,000 but less than $10,000 
shall be awarded to the responsible person offering to perform the contract at the lowest price 
quotation; provided, however, that the Town shall seek written price quotations from no fewer 
than three persons customarily providing the work for which the contract is being made 
available. When seeking written quotation, the Town shall make and keep a record of the names 
and addresses of all persons from whom price quotations were sought, the names of the persons 
submitting price quotations and the date and amount of each price quotation. Written price 
quotations submitted in accordance with this subsection do not require bid deposits. 

Every contract for the construction, reconstruction, installation, demolition, maintenance or 
repair of any building in Andover estimated to cost not less than $10,000 but not more than 
$25,000 shall be awarded to the responsible person offering to perform the contract at the lowest 
price. The Town shall make public notification of the contract and shall seek written responses 
from persons who customarily perform such work. The public notification shall include a scope 
of work statement that defines the work to be performed and provides potential responders with 
sufficient information regarding the objectives and requirements of the public agency and the 
time period within which the work is to be completed. For purposes of this subsection, "public 
notification" shall include, but not necessarily be limited to, posting, no less than two weeks 
before the time specified in the notification for the receipt of responses, the contract and scope of 
work statement on the website of the public agency and, either on the COMPASS system, so- 
called, or in the Central Register established under Section 20A of Chapter 9, and in a 
conspicuous place in or near the primary office of the public agency. Written price quotations 
submitted in accordance with this subsection do not require bid deposits. 

Every contract for the construction, reconstruction, installation, demolition, maintenance or 
repair of any building in Andover estimated to cost more than $25,000 but not more than 
$100,000 shall be awarded to the lowest responsible and eligible bidder on the basis of 
competitive bids publicly opened and read in accordance with the procedure set forth in said 
Section 39M of said Chapter 30. The term "pumping station" as used in this section shall mean a 
building or other structure which houses solely pumps and appurtenant electrical and plumbing 
fixtures. 

Every contract for the construction, reconstruction, installation, demolition, maintenance or 
repair of any building in Andover estimated to cost more than $100,000, except for a pumping 
station, to be constructed, reconstructed, installed, demolished, maintained or repaired as an 
integral part of a sewer construction or water construction project bid under the provisions of 
Section 39M of Chapter 30, shall be awarded to the lowest responsible and eligible general 
bidder on the basis of competitive bids in accordance with the procedure set forth in General 
Laws, Chapter 149, Section 44A to 44H, inclusive. 

When the General Court has approved the use of an alternative mode of procurement of 
construction for a project pursuant to Section 7E of Chapter 29, the Town shall follow the 
policies and procedures of this section and of Section 44B to 44H, inclusive, to the extent 
compatible with the mode of construction procurement selected. 

Notwithstanding the foregoing paragraph, the Town may undertake the procurement of modular 
buildings, in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 149, Section 44E. The Town may procure 

148 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27. 28 2009 

site work for modular buildings, including, but not limited to, construction of foundations, 
installations, and attachment to external utilities, or any portion of site work, either in 
combination with the procurement of modular buildings pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 149, 
Section 44E or on the basis of competitive bids pursuant to the foregoing paragraph. 
Notwithstanding the foregoing paragraph, the Town may procure energy management services in 
accordance with Section 1 1C of Chapter 25 A and regulations promulgated thereunder." 

This Act shall take effect immediately upon passage. The General Court may vary the 
form and substance of the requested legislation within the scope of the general public objective 
of the petition, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant & Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 1 1 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared Unanimous by the Moderator 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Punchard Free School Trustees - Petition to the General Court 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to submit the following petition to the General 
Court: 

Notwithstanding the provisions of Chapter 7 of the Acts of 1851, Chapter 76 of the Acts 
of 1853, Chapter 77 of the Acts of 1856, Chapter 396 of the Acts of 1869, Chapter 47 of the Acts 
of 1877, or any other General or Special Law to the contrary, the Board of Trustees of the 
Punchard Free School shall consist of five trustees, who shall be residents of the Town of 
Andover elected by the registered voters. The Trustees who are in office when this legislation 
becomes effective shall serve until the expiration of their terms. At the first election of the 
successors to the Trustees who are in office when this legislation becomes effective, the Town 
shall elect five Trustees, two of whom shall serve for terms of three years, two for terms of two 
years and one for a term of one year. At each Annual Town Election thereafter, the voters shall 
elect in place of Trustees whose terms are about to expire a like number of Trustees to serve for 
terms of three years, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Punchard Free School Trustees 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 12 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared Unanimous by the Moderator 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

FAA Lease 

149 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into a 
renewal of the lease between the Town and the United States of America, Federal Aviation 
Administration, of land at the Town of Andover Water Treatment Plant, for the purpose of 
mamtaining an Outer Marker and a Compass Locator Antenna servicing the Lawrence Municipal 
Airport, for a term of up to five years, on terms and conditions the Board deems in the best 
interest of the Town or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 

Article 13 as printed in the Warrant. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Transfer from Overlay Surplus 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from Overlay Surplus 
and appropriate to various fiscal years Allowance for Abatements and Exemptions accounts, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 14 be WITHDRAWN from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Insurance Recovery Transfer 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $110,585 from Insurance 
Proceeds in Excess of $20,000 account and appropriate to the Municipal Building/Insurance 
Fund, said sum being the amount of insurance proceeds received on May 22, 2008 for Structural 
Repairs to the Bancroft Elementary School, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 
Article 1 5 as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:12 P.M., until 
Wednesday, May 27, at 7:00 P.M. at the Collins Field House, Andover High School, 
Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - May 27, 2009 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed four hundred sixty seven (467) voters were 
admitted to the meeting. 

150 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

The meeting was called to order at 7:00 P.M. by Sheila M. Doherty, Moderator. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit eleven (11) non- voters to the meeting and to escort 
non-voters to the non- voter section thereafter. 

School Committee Chairman, Debra Silberstein presented School Committee members Arthur 
Barber, 3 Sparta Way and Anthony James, 1 5 Wethersfield Drive with a recognition awards for 
their completed terms of office on the Board. 

Ted Teichert Chairman of the Board of Selectmen and Debra Silberstein, Chairman School 
Committee introduced the 2009 Virginia Cole Award winner, Mr. Gerald H. Silverman, 56 
Dufton Road. Mr. Silverman, a long time resident of Andover, worked many years as an 
educator and administrator in the Andover School System. He served on the Board of Selectmen 
and many other committees as he helped improve the quality of life for the residents of Andover. 
His most recent and longtime commitment has been to provide the Town with a fireworks 
display for the Fourth of July each year, working tirelessly to solicit the funding to match the 
Towns appropriation each year. 

The Moderator announced various housekeeping issues to the meeting members, including 
turning off cell phones, the introduction of the Ombudsman, Christopher Vrountas, the use of 
Pro and Con Microphones, time limits, the location of microphones, stage participants and the 
location of voting sections. 

Town Yard Master Plan 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing or transfer from 
available funds and appropriate the sum of $30,000 to develop a master plan for the 
redevelopment of the existing Town Yard off Lewis Street, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On the request of the Planning Director and the Town Yard Task Force 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer 
from Article 32, 2004 Annual Town Meeting- Senior Center Plans and appropriate the sum of 
$30,000 to develop a master plan for the redevelopment of the existing Town Yard off Lewis 
Street, or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

5 Campanelli Drive - Right-of-First Refusal and Site Evaluation 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into a 
right-of-first refusal, or an option, to purchase 5 Campanelli Drive (Assessor's Map 142, Lot 6), 
on terms and conditions the Selectmen deem to be in the best interest of the Town, for general 
municipal purposes, including the development of a new Town Yard facility and to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a sum of $47,255 to acquire such a right or option 

151 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27. 28 2009 

and also for related expenditures to evaluate the purchase of the property including, but not 
limited to, an environmental report, title search, appraisal and other expenses incidental thereto, 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Yard Task Force 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into a right-of-first refusal, or an option, to purchase 5 
Campanelli Drive (Assessor's Map 142, Lot 6), on terms and conditions the Selectmen deem to 
be in the best interest of the Town, for general municipal purposes, including the development of 
a new Town Yard facility and to transfer $25,000 from Article 5, 2005 Annual Town Meeting 
Capital Projects Fund and transfer $2,255 from Article 32, 2004 Annual Town Meeting Senior 
Center Plans and appropriate the sum of $27,255 to acquire such a right or option or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Site Evaluation for a new Town Yard 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available 
funds a sum of $20,000 and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to evaluate a parcel or parcels 
of land for general municipal purposes, including the development of a new Town Yard facility. 
Said evaluation or evaluations shall include but not limited to, an environmental report, title 
search, appraisal and other expenses incidental and related thereto, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Town Yard Task Force 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer 
from Article 5, 2005 Annual Town Meeting Capital Projects Fund and appropriate the sum of 
$20,000 and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to evaluate a parcel or parcels of land for 
general municipal purposes, including the development of a new Town Yard facility. Said 
evaluation or evaluations shall include but not limited to, an environmental report, title search, 
appraisal and other expenses incidental and related thereto, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Medicare Extension Plans for New Retirees - Statute Acceptance 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 18A of Chapter 32B of the 
Massachusetts General Laws authorizing the Town to require all retirees, who retire after the 
acceptance of this Section, their spouses and dependents who are enrolled in Medicare Part A at 
no cost to a retiree, their spouse or dependents, or eligible for coverage thereunder at no cost to a 

152 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

retiree, their spouse or dependents, be required to enroll in a Medicare health benefits 
supplement plan offered by the Town, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 
Article 1 9 as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Fireworks 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will provide funding in the amount of $10,000 for a 
Fireworks Program as part of the Fourth of July Program from available funds, or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On petition of Gerald H. Silverman and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer 
from the following unexpended articles: 

$ 5,000.00 Article 48, 1997 Annual Town Meeting - River Road Land Acquisition 
$ 2,000.00 Article 21, 2000 Annual Town Meeting - Senior Tax Voucher Program 
$ 3,000.00 Article 36, 2002 Annual Town Meeting - Reassessment Program 

And appropriate the sum of $10,000 for a fireworks program as part of the Fourth of July 
program. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Funds from Stabilization Fund to School Department 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of two million dollars 
($2,000,000) to the School Department operating budget from the Stabilization Account, or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On petition of William Pennington and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 21 be WITFfDRAWN from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Transfer from Stabilization Fund to School Department for High School Athletics 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of one hundred thousand 
dollars to the School Department operating budget from the Stabilization Account, to offset a 
portion of a decrease in funding for the Andover High School Athletic Program, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

153 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

On petition of David Geaslen and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 22 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

Article 22 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
School Committee Report: Disapproval 

General Housekeeping Articles 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote the following consent articles, or take any other 
action related thereto: 

A. Grant Program Authorization 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town 
Manager to apply for, accept and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of 
any funds allotted to Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. S. Government 
under any State or Federal grant program, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

B. Road Contracts 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a contract with 
the Massachusetts Highway Department Commissioners or the Federal Government for the 
construction and maintenance of public highways in the Town of Andover for the ensuing year, 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

C. Town Report 

To act upon the report of the Town officers, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

D. Property Tax Exemptions 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 4, Chapter 73 of the Acts 
of 1986 as amended by Chapter 126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax 
exemption for Fiscal Year 2010 for those persons who qualify for property tax exemptions under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5, or take any other action related thereto. 

154 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

On request of the Board of Assessors 

E. Contracts in Excess of Three Years 

To see if the Town will vote in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 30B, Section 12(b), to authorize the Town Manager or the Superintendent of 
Schools to solicit and award contracts for terms exceeding three years but no greater than five 
years, including any renewal, extension or option, provided in each instance the longer term is 
determined to be in the best interest of the Town by a vote of the Board of Selectmen or the 
School Committee, as appropriate, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

F. Accepting Easements 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to accept grants of easements for streets, water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes 
or any public purpose on terms and conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best 
interests of the Town, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

G. Rescinding of Bond Authorizations 

To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond authorizations from prior Town 
Meetings, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town 
approve the consent agenda, Articles 23A through 23F. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the Town vote to rescind the following 
unissued bond authorizations in Article 23G as follows: 

$ 350,000 Article 11, 2002 Annual Town Meeting New Schools Additional Funding 
$ 250,000 Article 41, 2005 Annual Town Meeting Fishbrook Pumping Station 
$ 30,000 Article 32, 2004 Annual Town Meeting Senior Center Plans 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval (no report for 23 C) 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Granting Easements 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to grant easements for water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes or any public 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

purpose on terms and conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the 
Town, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that the Town approve Article 24 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared Unanimous by the Moderator A 2/3 vote is required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Unpaid Bills 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to 
pay unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred in prior fiscal years, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 25 be WITHDRAWN from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Chapter 90 Authorizations 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to acquire any necessary 
easements by gift, by purchase or by right of eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway 
Construction or any other federal or state aid program for road or sidewalk improvements, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 26 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared Unanimous by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Revolving Accounts 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the following revolving funds for 
certain Town departments under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2 for 
the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2009, or take any other action related thereto: 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 



Revolving Fund 


Authorized to 
Spend 


Use of Fund 


Revenue Source 


FY-2010 
Limit 


A. Community 


Division 


Advertising legal 


Applicant Fees 


$110,000 


Development & 


Heads 


hearing notice 






Planning Department 




expenses for 

permit 

applications 






B. Memorial Hall 


MHL Director 


Replacement of 


Restitution 


$20,000 


Library Lost/Damaged 




lost/damaged 


payments 




Materials 




library materials 


/charges to 
borrower or 
patron 




C. Health Clinic 


Public Health 


Clinic supplies 


Clinic participant 


$40,000 




Director 


and other 
expenses 


fees 




D. Division of 


Community 


Trips, ticket sales 


Participant fees 


$605,000 


Community Services 


Services 
Director 


and special 
programs and 
activities 






E. Division of Youth 


Youth 


All programs and 


Participant fees 


$400,000 


Services 


Services 
Director 


activities 
expenses, part- 
time help 






F. Field Maintenance 


Plant and 
Facilities 
Director 


Field 

maintenance, 
upgrade and 
related expenses 


Field rental fees 


$80,000 


G. Division of Elder 


Elder Services 


Senior programs, 


Participant fees 


$300,000 


Services 


Director 


classes and 
activities 






H. Public Safety 


Chief of 


Maintenance and 


Lease 


$50,000 




Police 


purchase of 
public safety 
radio and 
antennae 
equipment 


agreements for 
antenna users 




I. Memorial Hall 


MHL Director 


Purchase of 


Rental of 


$40,000 


Library Audio/Visual 




audio/visual 
materials 


audio/visual 
materials 




J. School Photocopy 


School Dept. 


Photocopy 


External Private 


$20,000 


Fees 




Center Costs 


Groups 




K. Compost Program 


Plant & 


Offset Compost 


Contractor 


$60,000 




Facilities 


Monitoring and 


permit fees, 






Director 


Cleanup 
Expenses 


revenues from 
sale of compost 




L. Solid Waste 


Public Works 


Offset Trash & 


CRT, HHW & 


$40,000 




Director 


Recycling Costs 


Trash fees 





157 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 



M. Stormwater 


Planning 


Consulting and 


Applicant 


$30,000 


Management 


Director 


environmental 
monitoring of 
Stormwater 
Management 
applications and 
permits 







On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote to approve Article 27 A 
through M - Revolving Accounts - as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Elderly/Disabled Transportation Program 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise by taxation a sum not to 
exceed $12,000 for the purpose of continuing to provide for an elderly and disabled 
transportation subsidy program, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Council on Aging 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 
Article 28 as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $12,000 from taxation. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Water Main Construction and Reconstruction 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing, or transfer from available 
funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $500,000 for the purpose of paying 
costs of engineering, designing, constructing, reconstructing or replacing water mains, or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer 
$100,000 from Article 20, 2003 Annual Town Meeting Water Treatment Plant Improvements 
and $400,000 from Article 47, 2004 Annual Town Meeting Water Storage Tanks and appropriate 
the sum of $500,000 for the purpose of paying costs of engineering, designing, constructing, 
reconstructing or replacing water mains, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and 
related thereto. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



158 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Water System Supply Improvements 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing, or transfer from available 
funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $250,000 for the purpose of paying 
costs of engineering, designing, replacing instrumentation and chemical feed systems, or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer 
$250,000 from Article 20, 2003 from the Water Treatment Plant and appropriate the sum of 
$250,000 for the purpose of paying costs of engineering, designing, replacing instrumentation 
and chemical feed systems, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Sale or Lease of Town Land 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the transfer of the care, custody, 
management and control of the parcel of land, shown as Land of Town ofAndover on a Plan of 
Easement in Andover, Mass. Owner: Town ofAndover, Dated March 26, 1995 by Andover 
Consultants, Inc., and recorded at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan 12821, as 
shown as Lot 2 on Assessors Map 55, to the Board of Selectmen and to authorize the Selectmen 
to sell or convey or lease the land on such terms and conditions as they deem in the best interest 
of the Town, even if the Town receives no financial payment, or take any other action related 
thereto. A copy of Plan 12821 and Assessors Map 55 are on file with the Town Clerk's Office. 

On petition of Mark B. Johnson, Esq. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 3 1 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to close debate. The motion passed by a 2/3 
vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 31 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote is required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 

Granting of Easements Across Town Land - Land on Essex Street 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to grant utility, and/or 
access and/or parking easements on the land shown as Land of Town ofAndover on a Plan of 
Easement in Andover, Mass. Owner: Town ofAndover, Dated March 26, 1995 by Andover 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Consultants, Inc. and recorded at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan 12821 as 
shown as Lot 2 on Assessors Map 55, on such terms and conditions and in such locations above 
or below ground as they deem in the best interest of the Town, even if the Town receives no 
financial payment, or take any other action related thereto. A copy of Plan 12821 and Assessors 
Map 55 are on file with the Town Clerk's Office. 

On petition of Mark B. Johnson, Esq. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 32 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 32 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote is required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 

Fire Rescue Ambulance 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $225,000 for the purpose of 
purchase of an ambulance, or to take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Fire Chief 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 33 be WITHDRAWN from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Ballardvale Fire Station Replacement 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $200,000 for the purpose of 
planning, engineering and design for the replacement of the Ballardvale Fire Station and 
expenses incidental and related thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Fire Chief 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $100,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of planning, engineering and designing a replacement of the 
Ballardvale Fire Station and for the payment of all other expenses incidental and related thereto, 
and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow said amount under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(21) of the General 
Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

160 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Watershed Protection Overlay District - Zoning By-law Amendment 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, Section 8.1 of the Zoning 
Bylaw, by deleting it in its entirety and replacement it with the following: 

"SECTION 8.0. SPECIAL DISTRICT REGULATIONS 

8.1 WATERSHED PROTECTION OVERLAY DISTRICT 

8.1.1. Purpose. The Watershed Protection Overlay District (WPOD) is established in the Town 
of Andover for the following purposes: 

1. To preserve and protect surface and ground water resources in the Fish 
Brook/Haggetts Pond Watershed Protection Overlay District (WPOD) for the 
health, safety and welfare of its people; 

2. To protect the community from the detrimental use and development of land and 
waters within the WPOD. 

3. The WPOD does not limit the existing authority of the Conservation Commission 
pursuant to G.L. c. 131, s. 40. 

4. This Bylaw is adopted under authority granted by the Home Rule Amendment of 
the Massachusetts Constitution, the Home Rule statutes, and pursuant to the 
regulations of the federal Clean Water Act found at 40 CFR 122.34. 

8.1.2. Establishment. The WPOD includes all the lands which create the catchment or drainage 
areas of Fish Brook or Haggetts Pond as part of their natural or man-made drainage system. The 
district includes all areas designated on the plan titled "Fish Brook/Haggetts Pond Watershed 
Protection Overlay District", dated December 1985, prepared by the Town Engineer, as 
amended, and also as amended by the plan titled "Topographic Plan Requested Revision to 
Watershed Protection Overlay District River Road, Andover, MA, dated January 19, 2006" 
prepared by Dana F. Perkins, Inc., for Richard and Kay Pelletier, 176 River Road, Andover, MA 
01810, which plans are on file in the office of the Town Clerk and which are hereby made part of 
the Town Zoning Maps. [Amended 4-24-2006 ATM, Art. 50] 

Within the WPOD, Priority Zones 1 and 2 shall be designated to identify areas where permitted 
uses and design standards shall apply based upon, in part, the linear distances from surface 
waters and tributaries. Priority Zone 1 shall include land areas up to 400 feet from the annual 
high water levels of Haggetts Pond, its tributaries, and Fish Brook, respectively. Priority Zone 2 
shall include land areas exceeding 400 feet and extending out to Vz mile from the edge of Priority 
Zone 1 (Priority Zones 1 and 2 shall apply to Fish Brook and any other Class A water source that 
is tributary to surface water supplies within the WPOD to a distance of 200 feet from the source). 

1 . Burden of Proof. When a property owner seeks town approval for any work done 
on a lot which is partially contained within the WPOD boundary, the owner must 
include with his or her application a map on a scale of one inch equals forty feet 
prepared by a registered professional surveyor, stamped by a Registered 
Professional Engineer specializing in Civil Engineering, and approved in writing 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

by the Town Engineer, showing the boundary of the WPOD with respect to the 
owner's property limits. The Planning Board may, upon review of the application, 
determine what portion, if any, of such lot is contained within the WPOD. The 
Planning Board may issue an order approving said plan if the Planning Board 
determines that land on such lot shown outside the WPOD is not part of the 
catchment or drainage areas of Fish Brook or Haggetts Pond or part of their 
natural or man-made drainage system. 

8.1.3. Overlay District. The WPOD is an overlay district and shall be superimposed on the 
other districts established by this by-law. Land in the WPOD may be used for any purpose 
otherwise permitted in the underlying district, subject to the additional restrictions which follow 
herein. 

8.1.4. Permitted Uses. The following uses are permitted within the WPOD, subject to the 
design standards set forth in Section 8.1.7: 

1 . Conservation of soil, water and plants; 

2. Outdoor recreation and nature study; 

3. Boat docks and landings, except on Haggetts Pond and Fish Brook, pedestrian and 
bicycle paths and bridges; and horse paths and bridges; 

4. Operation and maintenance of dams, splash boards and other water control, 
supply and conservation devices; 

5. Residential development, as permitted in the underlying district; 

6. Farming, gardening, nursery, conservation, golf courses, forestry, harvesting and 
grazing, subject to restrictions set forth in Section 8.1.5.3; 

7. Earth removal as defined in Sections 6.3.2, 6.3.3, and 6.3.4, where such removal 
will not endanger ground or surface water quality and where non-construction 
excavation or grading shall not come closer than four feet above maximum 
groundwater elevation. The angle of graded slopes shall be no greater than that 
which can be held by existing or planned vegetation; 

8. Construction, alteration, repair and maintenance of municipal infrastructure, 
including water system, sewer systems, drainage, roadways and public utilities; 

9. Storage of heating oil within a building, provided that all necessary state and local 
approvals have been obtained. 

10. Existing on-site sewage disposal and treatment systems within 400 feet of 
Haggetts Pond, provided that on-site disposal and treatment systems are 
maintained in accordance with requirements set forth in 310 CMR 15.300 et seq. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

8.1.5. Special Permit Uses. The Planning Board may allow the following uses within the 
WPOD upon the grant of a special permit and subject to any additional conditions the Planning 
Board may impose: 

1 . Ponds or other changes in water bodies or watercourses, created for recreational 
use or drainage improvements; 

2. The creation of ponds not subject to Conservation Commission jurisdiction under 
The Wetlands Protection Act 

3. The storage, manufacture or use of hazardous or toxic substances other than those 
prohibited in Section 8.1.6 as long as there is minimal risk to health, safety, and 
the environment as provided for in 310 CMR 40 Massachusetts Contingency 
Plan and would not exceed any state or federal water quality criteria or standards 
if spilled, discharged or otherwise released. All reasonable and necessary 
measures shall be taken to prevent spills, discharges or other releases of the 
hazardous or toxic substances to the environment. 

8.1.6. Prohibited Uses. The following uses are prohibited within the WPOD, except as 
otherwise noted within this By-Law: 

1 . The bulk storage of salt and other road de-icing chemicals; 

2. Landfills and open dumps as defined in 3 1 CMR 1 9.006; 

3. Automobile graveyards and junkyards, as defined in M.G.L. c. § 140B, 1; 

4. The discharge of stormwater into Fish Brook, Haggetts Pond, or any other surface 
water body or tributary stream within Priority Zones 1 or 2 for which oil/water 
separation devices have not been installed and regularly maintained at the nearest 
upstream manhole structure before the outfall; 

5. Any new building, structure, land-disturbing activities, excavation or fill within 
fifty feet of all water bodies and watercourses as defined in this by-law; except for 
that which is necessary for the operation, modification, repair, replacement or 
expansion of the town's public drinking water supply system, and foot, bicycle 
and/or horse paths and bridges and said systems which will be consistent with the 
purposes set forth in Section 8.1.1. 

6. The storage, management or disposal of solid waste or refuse as defined in 
Massachusetts regulations at 310 CMR 19 ; 

7. Gasoline service station, repair garage or body shop for motorized vehicles; 

8. The stockpiling, or disposal of snow within the WPOD boundaries from any 
sources either within or outside the boundaries of the WPOD; 

9. Unless otherwise exempted or excluded under federal, state, or local 
requirements, the storage, management, or disposal (including septic systems and 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

floor drains) of hazardous materials as defined in Massachusetts regulations cited 
at 310 CMR 40.1600 (Oil and Hazardous Materials List) and Federal regulations 
cited at 40CFR Part 355 (Extremely Hazardous Materials List). 

10. Petroleum, fuel oil, and heating oil bulk stations and terminals including, but not 
limited to, those listed under Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Codes 5171 
and 5983. SIC Codes are established by the US Office of Management and 
Budget and may be determined by referring to the publication, Standard Industrial 
Classification Manual and any other subsequent amendments; 

11. Discharge to the ground of non-sanitary wastewater including industrial and 
commercial process wastewater; 

12. Landfills receiving only wastewater and/or septage residuals including those 
approved by the Department pursuant to M.G.L. c. 21, §§ 26 through 53; M.G.L. 
c. 1 1 1, § 17; M.G.L c. 83, §§ 6 and 7, and regulations promulgated there under; 

13. Unless otherwise exempted or excluded under federal, state, or local 
requirements, facilities that generate, treat, store, or dispose of hazardous waste 
that are subject to M.G.L. c. 21 C and 310 CMR 30.00; 

14. Unless otherwise exempted or excluded under federal, state, or local 
requirements, the storage of liquid hazardous materials, as defined in M.G.L. c. 
2 IE, and/or liquid petroleum products; 

15. Storage of commercial fertilizers, as defined in MGL c 128, § 64; 

16. Storage of sludge and septage; 

1 7. Storage, stockpiling, or spreading of animal manure within Priority Zone 1 ; 

18. Earth removal, consisting of the removal of soil, loam, sand, gravel or any other 
earth material (including mining activities) to within four feet of historical high 
groundwater as determined from monitoring wells and historical water table 
fluctuation data compiled by the United States Geological Survey, except for 
excavations for building foundations, roads, or utility works; 

19. Any new on-site sewage treatment and disposal systems within 400 feet of a 
surface water supply as provided for in 310 CMR 15.211 and within 200 feet of 
one or more rivers, streams, or swales which are tributary to the surface water 
supplies; 

20. Prohibitions not otherwise specified herein, but provided for in 310 CMR 22.20B, 
Surface Water Supply Protection. 

21. For lots constructed after June 1, 2009 in addition to the above named prohibited 
uses the following shall apply: Any new building, structure, land-disturbing 
activities, excavation or fill within Priority Zone 1 as defined in this by-law; 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

except for that which is necessary for the operation, modification, repair, 
replacement or expansion of the town's public drinking water supply system, and 
foot, bicycle and/or horse paths and bridges and said systems which will be 
consistent with the purposes set forth in Section 8.1.1. 

8.1.7. Design Standards. Any development of land within the WPOD, except for 
modifications/changes to previously existing buildings or structures within Priority Zone 1 , shall 
meet the following design standards in addition to all standards imposed by the underlying 
zoning district. Where a lot is partially contained within the WPOD boundary, these standards 
shall apply to that portion of the lot which is determined to be within the WPOD: 

1. Slopes which exceed an average of fifteen percent (15%) over a distance often 
feet or more shall remain undisturbed; 

2. Where a lot is partially outside the WPOD, the site plan shall, to the greatest 
extent possible, locate pollution sources, such as subsurface sewage disposal 
systems, outside the district; 

3. Vegetation on the lot shall be planted and located in such a way as to maximize 
groundwater recharge, absorb and filter runoff and reduce erosion; 

4. All construction activities as allowed within the WPOD shall be designed or sited 
to minimize erosion and runoff, by such practices as minimizing the construction 
period, slope stabilization, ditch maintenance, filtering, sedimentation basins and 
re-vegetation. A Sedimentation and Control Plan, prepared and stamped by a 
Massachusetts Registered Professional Engineer, and approved by the Town 
Planning Board and other local agencies as may be needed, shall be required for 
all construction and land-disturbing activities within the designated Priority Zone 
1 of water bodies and tributaries to the water supply as defined in Section 8.1.2. In 
addition, a Planting and Re-vegetation Plan prepared by a licensed Landscape 
Architect and approved by the Town shall be required as part of all construction 
and land disturbing activities within the WPOD. 

5. The renovation, expansion, and/or upgrade "of existing on-site sewage treatment 
and disposal systems shall be conducted in accordance with requirements set forth 
in 310 CMR 15.000 et seq., unless otherwise specified herein. 

8.1.8. Special Permit Procedures. 

1. Filing of the Application. Twelve complete copies of the application for a special 
permit for land use within the WPOD shall be filed with the Planning Board on a 
form approved by the Planning Board. 

2. Review by Other Boards and Agencies. Before acting upon the application, the 
Planning Board shall submit it to the following boards and agencies which may 
review it jointly or separately: the Board of Health, the Conservation 
Commission, the Department of Public Works and other boards or agencies that 
the Planning Board may deem appropriate. Any such agency to which petitions 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

are referred for review shall submit such recommendations as it deems 
appropriate to the Planning Board and the applicant. 

3. Further Requirements for Information. After the opportunity for review by other 

boards and agencies, the Planning Board may require the applicant to supply more 
specific information about the proposed development as per questions and 
comments of the reviewing boards and agencies. 

8.1.9. Decision. The Planning Board may grant a special permit for land use within the WPOD 
hereunder only if it finds that the applicant has met the general requirements of Sections 8.1 and 
9.4, and that the applicant has demonstrated the following: 

1 . That the plan will preserve and protect the surface and ground water resources in 
the WPOD for the health, safety and welfare of the town's people; 

2. That the plan will protect the community from the detrimental use and 
development of land and waters within the WPOD; 

3 . That the design standards of Section 8.1.7 have been met. 

4. That Special Permits Procedures 8. 1 .8 (2.) have been met. 

8.1.10. Conditions and Restrictions. The Planning Board may impose any conditions and 
restrictions required to mitigate any potential damage to surface and ground water resources and, 
in reaching its decision, will consider the simplicity, reliability and effectiveness of these 
mitigating measures and the damage likely to result if these measures were to fail. If the 
Planning Board disagrees with the recommendations of the Conservation Commission or the 
Board of Health, the reasons shall be stated in writing. 

8.1.11. Severability: If any provision, paragraph, sentence, or clause of this By-law shall be 
held invalid for any reason, all other provisions shall continue in full force and effect." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Health 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 35 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared More that a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission Report: Approval 

Board of Health Report: Approval 

Sign Bylaw Amendment - Zoning Bylaw 

166 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 5.2., Signs, in the Andover 
Zoning By-law, by deleting the existing text in its entirety and replacing it with the following: 

"SECTION 5.2. SIGNS 

5.2.1. Purpose. The following sign regulations are intended to: 

1 . Preserve the historical ambiance and aesthetic character of the town; 

2. Maintain public safety by eliminating potential hazards to motorists created by 
distracting or confusing sign displays and excessive illumination; 

3. Encourage efficient communication for business identification and public 
information. 

5.2.2. Definitions. In this bylaw, the following terms shall apply: 

1. Sign: A sign shall consist of any of the following elements: 

a. Lettering, words, numerals, emblems, trademarks, logos, images, drawings, 
pictures, graphics, pennants, streamers, or other devices of any material or 
construction, however displayed, whether as an independent structure or as part of 
a building or other structure or object; 

b. Any visual device designed to inform, attract or draw the attention of persons 
outside the premises on which the device is located, including messages within or 
attached to windows and doors; 

c. Any exterior building surface that is internally illuminated or decorated with 
gaseous tubing, LED displays or back lighting. 

2. Sign Area: The area of the smallest horizontal or vertical rectangle enclosing the entire 
display area of the sign. The display area of a sign is the entire area, different in color or 
composition from the facade or common trim of the building, used to frame or provide a 
background for the sign. The display area may contain open space and irregular shapes if they 
are part of the sign. The display area shall also include internally illuminated, back-lit or 
decoratively lighted sign support structures if such elements are present. The area of double- 
sided signs shall be calculated using the area of only one face of the sign. 

3. Sign Height: The distance measured from the ground level at the base of the sign to the top of 
the sign or support structure, whichever is higher. For freestanding signs, the land under or 
surrounding the sign may not be built up or elevated to reduce the calculated height of the sign. 

4. Sign Support Structure: Any device, such as a pole, bracket or post, used to support a sign. 
The sign support structure shall be excluded from the calculation of the sign area if it contains 
none of the elements described in §5.2.2.1 above, and, for freestanding signs, the total width of 
the support structure is less than 25% of the width of the supported sign. 

5. Attached Sign: A sign attached parallel to the facade of a building, facing in the same direction 
as the facade. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

6. Freestanding Sign: A sign that is supported by its own structure and is not attached to a 
building or other structure. 

7. Projecting Sign: A sign mounted perpendicular to the building facade. 

8. Double-sided Sign: A freestanding or projecting sign having two parallel opposite faces 
separated by a distance of not more than twelve (12) inches. A sign with two opposite faces that 
are not parallel shall be considered a double-sided sign if the two faces are joined to each other, 
or to a common support structure, at one end, and the angle of separation between the two faces 
does not exceed thirty (30) degrees. 

9. Temporary Sign: A non-permanent sign that is displayed for a limited duration. Temporary 
signs may be exterior (displayed on the exterior or outside of a structure) or interior (attached or 
displayed from the inside of a structure, viewed from the outside through a window or other 
opening). 

10. Portable or Removable Sign: A temporary sign of any shape or configuration that is self- 
supporting and not permanently fixed or mounted to the ground or to another structure. 

1 1. Internally Illuminated Sign: A sign that is illuminated by a light source internal to the sign. 
Signs having a light source that forms the exterior surface of the sign or all or part of the design 
elements, shall be considered to be internally illuminated. 

12. Nonconforming sign: A sign, including its support structure, that does not conform to the 
regulations prescribed in this bylaw, but which was in existence at the time the regulations 
became effective and was lawful at the time it was installed or erected. 

13. Open Space: For the purposes of this Section 5.2. open space shall be defined as 
undeveloped land available to the public at no cost, for passive recreation such as hiking, bird 
watching, fishing, photography, picnicking, cross country skiing, biking, horseback riding or 
other activities which do not alter or disturb the terrain and at the same time to conserve natural 
and scenic resources, protect air, streams or water supply, and enhance the value of the land to 
the public. 

5.2.3. General Provisions. 

1 . Exemptions. The following signs are exempt from the provisions of the bylaw: 

a. Flags and insignia of any government, except when they are displayed in 
connection with the advertising or promotion of a commercial product or service. 

b. Legal notices or informational devices erected or required by public agencies. 

c. Signs affixed to standard gasoline pumps bearing the formula and price of 
gasoline. Such signs shall not exceed 2 square feet in area. Additional signage on 
the pumps may not exceed 20% of the surface area of the pump. 

d. Integral decorative or architectural features of buildings, except for lettering, 
trademarks, moving parts or parts internally illuminated or decorated with 
gaseous tube or other lights. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

e. On-premises signs intended to guide and direct traffic and parking, not exceeding 
two (2) square feet in area and four (4) feet in height and bearing no advertising 
matter or internal illumination. 

f. On valances of awnings or similar devices, lettering or symbols not exceeding 
three (3) inches in height. 

g. On awnings or similar devices, one symbol or graphic element, without text, not 
exceeding five (5) square feet per awning. 

h. Signs located on facilities or land under the care and control of the Massachusetts 

Bay Transportation Authority; 
i. Banners installed subject to the provisions of the Andover General Bylaw, Article 

XII §44. 

2. Relevance. A sign shall pertain to the premises on which it is located or to products, 
accommodations, services or activities that regularly occur or are offered on the premises. 

3. Maintenance. All signs shall be maintained in a safe and neat condition to the satisfaction of 
the Inspector of Buildings and in accordance with the Commonwealth of the Massachusetts State 
Building Code, 780 CMR. 

4. Nonconforming Signs. 

a. Any nonconforming sign and/or support structure, legally permitted and erected 
prior to the adoption of this provision, or any amendments thereto, which remains 
un-altered in any way, may be continued and maintained. 

b. Any nonconforming sign and/or support structure shall be removed within thirty 
(30) days of a change in use or termination of activities on the premises. 

c. Nonconforming signs shall not be enlarged, rebuilt, restored or altered except in 
conformity with this bylaw. 

d. Any sign which has been destroyed or damaged to the extent that the cost of 
repair or restoration will exceed one-third (1/3) of the replacement value as of the 
date of such damage or destruction shall not be repaired, rebuilt, restored or 
altered except in conformity with this bylaw. 

5. Liability. No sign shall project more than five feet over any public right-of-way or other 
public property. Any sign projecting over a public right-of-way shall be covered by liability 
insurance in the amount of two million dollars ($2,000,000) as verified by a certificate of 
insurance filed with the Town Clerk. 

5.2.4. Sign Permit. Unless specifically exempted or provided for elsewhere in this section, no 
sign shall be installed, erected, enlarged, redesigned or structurally altered without a sign permit 
issued by the Inspector of Buildings. 

1 . Application and Review. 

a. Sign Permit Application: A completed sign permit application, fulfilling all 

requirements for requested materials and documents and specifying all pertinent 
dimensions and materials, shall be submitted to the Inspector of Buildings prior to 
the installation or alteration of any sign for which a permit is required. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

b. Review by the Design Review Board: The Design Review Board (DRB) shall, 

within thirty (30) days of submission, review applications for all signs in the 
General Business (GB) and Mixed Use (MU) Districts, as well as all municipal 
signs equal to or greater than four (4) square feet in area, prior to issuance of a 
sign permit. Applications for review by the Design Review Board shall be 
submitted on a standard application form specified by the DRB. See §5.2.15, 
Design Guidelines for Signs. 

2. Criteria for a Special Permit. When acting on an application for a special permit, the Board 
of Appeals shall consider the following: 

a. The character of the proposed sign and its suitability to the building and the 
surrounding neighborhood. 

b. Its relationship to the architectural style, size and scale of the building. 

c. The relevance of the information on the sign to the business or activities 
conducted on the premises. 

d. The impact of the size and illumination of the sign on other establishments and 
the surrounding neighborhood. 

e. The criteria specified in §9.6.4 of this Bylaw, and such other factors as the Board 
of Appeals deems appropriate in order to assure that the public interest is 
protected. 

5.2.5. Prohibited Signs and Devices. 

1 . No sign shall be lighted, except by a steady external and stationary light source which is 
shielded and directed solely at the sign, unless specifically provided for in this bylaw. 

2. No illumination shall be permitted which casts glare onto any residential premises or onto 
any portion of a way so as to create a traffic hazard. 

3. No commercial signs shall be illuminated in any residential district, or within two 
hundred (200) feet of a residential district, between the hours of 9:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m., 
unless the establishment is open to the public. 

4. No sign shall be illuminated by any color other than colorless or white light, except for 
temporary holiday lighting. 

5. No animated, revolving, flashing, backlit, exposed neon or similar exposed gaseous tube 
illuminated signs shall be permitted. 

6. No signs shall be attached to motor vehicles, trailers or other movable objects regularly 
or recurrently located for fixed display. 

7. Visibility for motorists and pedestrians shall not be obstructed at any intersection, 
driveway, or crosswalk. See also Article VIII, §4. 1.3. 2. g. 

8. No portable or removable sign shall be allowed in any zoning district except as permitted 
under §5.2.7.3. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

9. No attached exterior sign shall cover any portion of a window or door casing. 

10. No signs shall be allowed on the uppermost roof of any building. 

11. No portion of a sign shall extend above the highest point of the roof or parapet of the 
building to which it is attached. 

5.2.6. Permanent Signs allowed in all zoning districts. The following signs are allowed in all 
zoning districts. See also specific requirements for each zoning district in §5.2.9 through 
§5.2.14, inclusive. 

1 . One sign, either attached or freestanding, indicating only the name of the owner or occupant, 
street number and permitted uses or occupations engaged in thereon, does not require a sign 
permit if it does not exceed two (2) square feet in area. 

2. Open Space signs. A sign on open space or other undeveloped property open to the public, 
bearing no commercial, or advertising material and displaying historical, cultural, educational, 
environmental, or safety information pertaining to such property and/or rules relating to the 
public use thereof, requires no sign permit if the sign is less than thirty five (35) square feet in 
area 

3. Off-Premises Directional Signs. 

a. The Board of Selectmen may allow, by special permit, one un-lighted off- 
premises directional sign or signs within the public right-of-way or at any 
intersection designating the route to an establishment not on the street or way to 
which the sign is oriented. 

b. The Board of Appeals may allow, by special permit, an off-premises directional 
sign or signs on private property designating the route to an establishment 
provided that the sign will not endanger public safety and is of such size, location 
and design that it will not be detrimental to the character of the neighborhood. 

c. No off-premises directional sign shall exceed two (2) square feet in area. 

d. At locations where directions to more than one establishment are to be provided, 
all such directional signs shall be incorporated into a single sign support structure 
that shall not exceed six (6) feet in height. 

4. Except as provided in Section 5.2.7. Political speech signs shall be allowed in all zoning 
districts but may not exceed the regulations for signs in said district. 

5.2.7. Temporary Signs allowed in all zoning districts. 

1 . General requirements. 

a. Temporary signs shall be allowed if the sign announces or provides directions to a 
sale or a special event having a limited and specific duration. 

b. Temporary signs shall not advertise a continuing or regularly recurring business 
operation, product or a routinely provided service. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

c. Temporary signs shall be removed promptly when the information they display is 
out of date or no longer relevant. 

d. Temporary signs may be installed or in place for a period not to exceed thirty (30) 
days unless otherwise specified in this Bylaw. 

2. Temporary Signs not requiring a Sign Permit: 

a. Interior temporary 7 signs that do not exceed thirty percent (30%) of the transparent 
area of the window and/or door on which they are affixed or displayed. 

b. Exterior temporary signs, unless otherwise stipulated in this bylaw, shall not 
exceed ten (10) square feet in aggregate area per business entity. Permanently- 
installed sign support structures erected solely for the display of 'temporary signs' 
are prohibited. 

c. Political signs pertaining to a candidate or ballot question appearing in an 
upcoming duly-called election in the Town of Andover. 

i. Such signs shall be permitted only on private property. 

ii. Such signs shall have an area not to exceed six (6) square feet. 

iii. Such signs shall not be higher than three (3) feet above ground level. 

iv. Such signs shall be stationary 7 and shall not be illuminated. 

d. Unless otherwise specified in this Bylaw, temporary' signs pertaining to other 
noncommercial issues shall require no sign permit and shall be allowed in all 
zoning districts. Such signs shall be subject to the requirements set forth in 
§5.2.7.2.c above. 

e. One (1) temporary 7 sign, related to property maintenance or improvement which 
does not require a building permit, shall be allowed on the premises associated 
with the maintenance or improvement, subject to the following conditions: 

i. The sign shall not be lighted or illuminated. 

ii. The sign shall have an area not to exceed six (6) square feet. 

iii. The sign shall be set back a minimum of fifteen (15) feet from the nearest 
vehicular public or private way and shall not obstruct the line of sight for 
vehicles entering or exiting the property" or adjacent properties. 

iv. The sign shall be removed within tliirty (30) days of the completion of the 
work on the premises. 

f. One (1) temporary sign, related to the construction, maintenance or improvement 
of a property- requiring the issuance of a building permit, shall be allowed on the 
property associated with the building permit, subject to the following conditions: 

L The sign shall not be lighted or illuminated. 

ii. A freestanding sign shall have an area not to exceed fifteen (15) square 

feet and a height not to exceed five (5) feet, 
iii. A sign attached to the structure under construction shall have an area not 

to exceed fifteen (15) square feet and a height not to exceed ten (10) feet 

above the ground level, 
iv. A freestanding sign shall be set back a minimum of fifteen (15) feet from 

the nearest vehicular public or private way and shall not obstruct the line 

of sight for vehicles entering or exiting the property or adjacent properties, 
v. The sign shall be removed within thirty- (30) days of project's completion, 

or when an occupancy permit is issued, whichever is sooner. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

g. A non-profit entity or institution may install a temporary sign announcing or 

providing directions to a specific event or occurrence, subject to the following 
conditions: 

i. The sign area shall not exceed twelve (12) square feet, 

ii. The sign may be installed for a period not to exceed thirty (30) days. 

3. Temporary Signs requiring a Sign Permit: 

a. Portable or Removable Sign: The Inspector of Buildings may issue a permit for 
the temporary placement of a portable or removable sign that announces or 
provides directions to a specific event or occurrence, subject to the following 
conditions: The permit may impose limiting conditions, including among other 
matters the number of signs allowed at each location. 

i. The sign shall be securely anchored so as not to be dislodged or blow 

over, 
ii. The sign shall be neat and professional in appearance, 
iii. The sign shall have an area not to exceed six (6) square feet and a height 

not to exceed four (4) feet, 
iv. The sign shall be removed at the close of each business day and at the 

expiration of the permit, 
v. The sign shall not obstruct a public or private walkway. 

b. Real Estate Signs: The Inspector of Buildings may issue a renewable one-year 
permit for the temporary placement of a sign advertising the sale, rental or lease 
of the premises or subdivision on which the sign is erected. No sign permit for an 
individual sign shall be required if the erecting agent has obtained a blanket one- 
year permit for erecting such signs. All real estate signs shall meet the following 
requirements: 

i. In the SRA, SRB, and SRC zoning districts, the sign area shall not exceed 

eight (8) square feet, 
ii. In all other zoning districts, the sign area shall not exceed twenty-five (25) 

square feet. 
iii. The sign shall not be lighted or illuminated. 

5.2.8. Signs in Residential Districts (SRA, SRB, SRC, APT). 

1 . Single Family Residential Districts (SRA), (SRB), and (SRC). In addition to the signs allowed 
in §5.2.6, the following signs are allowed: 

a. One sign, either attached or freestanding, indicating only the name of the owner 
or occupant, street number and permitted uses or occupations engaged in thereon; 
does not require a sign permit and shall not exceed two (2) square feet in area. 

b. Any sign, either attached or freestanding, that exceeds two (2) square feet in area 
may be allowed by special permit from the Board of Appeals. In no case, 
however, shall the sign area exceed six (6) square feet or the sign height exceed 
four (4) feet. 

2. Apartment Districts (APT). In addition to the signs allowed in §5.2.6, the following signs are 
allowed: 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

a. One (1) freestanding sign, identifying entry points to the housing complex on 

each street on which the complex has street frontage, provided that the frontage 
also provides vehicular or pedestrian access to the complex. The sign area shall 
not exceed fifteen (15) square feet and the sign height shall not exceed eight (8) 
feet. 

5.2.9. Signs in General Business (GB) Districts. In addition to the signs allowed in §5.2.6, the 
following signs are allowed for commercial or business uses: 

1. One (1) attached sign shall be allowed, oriented to each street and parking lot on which the 
commercial or business use has a facade, providing that such facade has either a window or a 
direct entryway into the use's space. 

a. The sign may be either attached flat against the wall or placed on a fixed canopy 
of the building. 

b. No portion of the sign shall extend above the highest point of the roof or parapet 
of the building to which it is attached. 

c. The sign area for any individual commercial or business use shall not exceed 
fifteen (15) percent of the portion of the facade associated with that use. 

d. Signs oriented to the street shall not exceed fifty (50) square feet in area. 

e. Signs oriented to a parking lot shall not exceed twenty-five (25) square feet in 
area unless they mark the primary entrance to a building or establishment, in 
which case the sign area shall not exceed fifty (50) square feet. 

2. In addition to the above, each building that is set back a minimum of five (5) feet from the 
property line may install one (1) freestanding sign, with a sign area not to exceed twelve (12) 
square feet and a sign height not to exceed six (6) feet above ground level. 

3. In addition to the above, each commercial or business use may install one (1) projecting sign 
on each facade providing that such facade has either a window or a direct entryway into the use's 
space, subject to the following conditions: 

a. The sign area shall not exceed nine (9) square feet, excluding sign support 
structure. 

b. The bottom of a projecting sign shall be at least eight (8) feet above the ground, 
and the top of the sign shall be no more than twenty-five (25) feet from the 
ground. 

c. No sign shall project more than five (5) feet from the facade to which it is 
attached. 

d. A larger sign may be allowed by special permit from the Board of Appeals; in no 
case, however, shall the sign area exceed fifteen (15) square feet. 

4. A building occupied by multiple commercial or business uses may install a single directory 
sign, either attached to or projecting from the building, identifying those occupants. The total 
area of such a directory sign shall not exceed one (1) square foot per occupant. 

5. Unlighted graphics, lettering or symbols with transparent background mounted on the inside 
of windows or transparent entry doors shall require no sign permit if their area does not exceed 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

30% of the glass or transparent area. Telephone numbers, web addresses, prices, and similar text 
shall not exceed two (2) inches in height. 

5.2.10. Signs in Mixed Use (MU) Districts. In addition to the signs allowed in §5.2.6, the 
following signs are allowed: 

1. One (1) attached sign shall be allowed, oriented to each street and parking lot on which the 
commercial or business use has a facade, providing that such facade has either a window or a 
direct entryway into the use's space. 

a. The sign may be either attached flat against the wall or placed on a fixed canopy 
of the building. 

b. No portion of the sign shall extend above the highest point of the roof or parapet 
of the building to which it is attached. 

c. The sign area for any individual commercial or business use shall not exceed ten 
(10) percent of the portion of the facade associated with that use and in no case 
shall the sign area exceed eighty (80) square feet. 

2. In addition to the above, each building that is set back a minimum of five (5) feet from the 
property line may install one (1) freestanding sign, with a sign area not to exceed twenty-five 
(25) square feet and a sign height not to exceed eight (8) feet above ground level. 

3. In addition to the above, each commercial or business use may install one (1) projecting sign 
on each facade of the building, subject to the following conditions: 

a. The facade shall have either a window or a direct entryway to the premises. 

b. The sign area shall not exceed nine (9) square feet, excluding any sign support 
structure. 

c. No sign shall project more than five (5) feet from the facade to which it is 
attached. 

d. A larger sign may be allowed by special permit from the Board of Appeals; in no 
case, however, shall the sign area exceed fifteen (15) square feet. 

4. A building occupied by multiple commercial or business uses may install a single directory 
sign, either attached to or projecting from the building, identifying those occupants. The total 
area of such a directory sign shall not exceed one (1) square foot for each occupant listed 
thereon. 

5. Unlighted graphics, lettering or symbols with transparent background mounted on the inside 
of windows or transparent entry doors shall require no sign permit if their area does not exceed 
30% of the glass or transparent area. Telephone numbers, web addresses, prices, and similar text 
shall not exceed two (2) inches in height. 

5.2.11. Signs in Office Park Districts (OP) and Limited Service Districts (LS). In addition to 
the signs allowed in §5.2.6, the following signs are allowed: 

1. One (1) freestanding sign shall be allowed for each street upon which a building or complex 
has frontage, subject to the following conditions: 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

a. The sign area shall not exceed twenty-five (25) square feet and the sign height 
shall not exceed eight (8) feet. 

b. The Board of Appeals may grant, subject to the criteria of §5.2.4.2, a special 
permit for a larger sign if required for legibility, up to sixteen (16) feet in height, 
if the property fronts on a high-speed, limited access highway. 

2. In addition to the above, one (1) attached sign for each street upon which a building or 
complex has frontage. The sign area shall not exceed twenty-five (25) square feet. No portion of 
the sign shall extend above the highest point of the roof or parapet of the building to which it is 
attached. 

3. In addition to the above, each business or tenant shall be limited to one sign (attached or 
projecting) for each street and parking lot on which the business or tenant has an entryway, the 
sign area shall not exceed three (3) square feet. 

4. The Board of Appeals may grant, subject to the criteria of §5.2.4.2, a special permit for a 
second sign on a building facing a limited access, high-speed highway. The content of a second 
sign shall be limited to the name of the principal tenant of the building. 

5.2.12. Signs in Industrial G (IG) Districts. In addition to the signs allowed in §5.2.6, the 
following signs are allowed: 

1 . One sign attached flat against the wall or fixed canopy of a building, identifying the name of 
the firm and/or the goods and services available or produced on the premises, subject to the 
following conditions: 

a. The total area of all such signs on a building shall not exceed twenty percent 
(20%) of the area of the side of the building to which they are attached, or eighty 
(80) square feet, whichever is less. 

b. No portion of the sign shall extend above the highest point of the roof or parapet 
of the building to which it is attached. 

2. In addition to the above, one (1) freestanding sign, identifying the name of the firm and/or the 
goods and services available or produced on the premises, for each street on which the property 
fronts, subject to the following conditions: 

a. The area of each sign shall not exceed fifty (50) square feet. 

b. No part of any such sign shall be more than eight (8) feet above ground level. 

c. No such sign shall be located closer than five (5) feet to any property line or the 
line of any street or way. 

3. The Board of Appeals may grant, subject to the criteria of §5.2.4.2, a special permit for a 
larger or an internally-illuminated sign. 

5.2.13. Signs in Industrial A (IA) Districts. In addition to the signs allowed in §5.2.6, the 
following signs are allowed: 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

1 . One or more signs attached flat against the wall or canopy of a building, identifying the name 
of the firm and/or the goods and services available or produced on the premises, subject to the 
following conditions: 

a. The total area of all such signs on a building shall not exceed twenty percent 
(20%) of the area of the side of the building to which they are attached, or two 
hundred (200) square feet, whichever is less. 

b. No portion of the sign shall extend above the highest point of the roof or parapet 
of the building to which it is attached. 

2. One (1) freestanding sign, identifying the name of the firm and/or the goods and services 
available or produced on the premises, for each street on which the property fronts, subject to the 
following conditions: 

a. The area of each sign shall not exceed one hundred (1 00) square feet. 

b. No part of any such sign shall be more than twenty-five (25) feet above ground 
level. 

c. No such sign shall be located closer than five (5) feet to any property line or the 
line of any street or way. 

3. Internally illuminated signs are allowed. 

5.2.14. Signs in Industrial D (ID) Districts. In addition to the signs allowed in §5.2.6, the 
following signs are allowed: 

1 . One or more signs attached flat against the wall or canopy of a building, identifying the name 
of the firm and/or the goods and services available or produced on the premises, subject to the 
following conditions: 

a. The total area of all such signs on a building shall not exceed ten percent (10%) of 
the area of the side of the building to which they are attached, or two hundred 
(200) square feet, whichever is less. 

b. No portion of the sign shall extend above the highest point of the roof or parapet 
of the building to which it is attached. 

2. In addition to the above, one (1) freestanding sign, identifying the name of the firm and/or the 
goods and services available or produced on the premises, for each street on which the property 
fronts, subject to the following conditions: 

a. The area of each sign shall not exceed one hundred (1 00) square feet. 

b. No part of any such sign shall be more than six (6) feet above ground level. 

c. No such sign shall be located closer than five (5) feet to any property line or the 
line of any street or way. 

3. Internally illuminated signs are allowed. 

5.2.15. Design Guidelines for Signs. The following are further means by which the objectives 
for signs stated in Section 5.2.1 can be served. These guidelines are not mandatory, but the 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

degree of compliance with them shall be considered by the Special Permit Granting Authority in 
acting upon special permits, and by the Design Review Board as authorized hereunder. 

1 . Efficient Communication. 

a. Signs should not display brand names, symbols or slogans of nationally 
distributed products except in cases where the majority of the floor or lot area of 
the premises is devoted to manufacture, processing or sale of that specific 
product. 

b. Premises chiefly identified by or associated with a specific product brand name 
(such as gasoline or automobiles) should devote some part of their permitted sign 
area to displaying the identity of the local outlet or proprietor. 

c. Signs should not contain advertising slogans or other advertising material which 
is not an integral part of the name or other identification of the product or 
enterprise. 

d. Sign content normally should not occupy more than forty percent (40%) of the 
sign background, whether a signboard or a building element. 

e. Non-verbal devices should be considered, in addition to text, as such graphic 
images can provide rapid and effective communication as well as character. 

2. Environmental Relationship. 

a. Sign brightness should not be excessive in relation to background lighting levels, 

e.g., averaging not in excess of one hundred foot-lamberts in the downtown or 
similarly bright areas and not in excess of twenty foot-lamberts in unlighted 
outlying areas. 

3. Relationship to Buildings. 

a. Signs should be sized and located so as to not interrupt, obscure or hide the 
continuity of columns, cornices, eaves, sill lines or other architectural elements of 
the building and, wherever possible, should reflect and emphasize the building's 
architectural form. 

b. Sign materials, colors and lettering should be representative of and appropriate to 
the character of the building to which the sign relates, just as sign size should be 
related to building size." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this bylaw be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto 

On request of the Design Review Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that that the Town approve Article 36 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend Article 36 by deleting section 
5.2.3.1.h. which states: "Signs on facilities or land under the care and control of the 
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority" and renumber section 5.2.3.1.i to 5.2.3.1.h." 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

The Amendment passed by a Majority Vote. 

The amended motion was approved: 

VOTE: Declared more that a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Portable Signs - Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 10.0 Definitions in the Andover 
Zoning By-law by deleting the text "A-Frame Sign: A self-supporting, temporary sign or device 
including, but not limited to, signs in the shape of an A, signs in the shape of a T, signs in the 
shape of an H, and other frames that are self supporting", and by replacing the text with: 

''Portable or Removable Sign: A temporary sign of any shape or configuration that is self- 
supporting and not permanently fixed or mounted to the ground or to another structure." 

and by deleting the text following the definition of Projecting Sign "A sign which is affixed to a 
building, is perpendicular to a building and extends horizontally no more than five feet beyond 
the surface to which it is affixed. No Sign shall project vertically above the eave line of the roof 
and replacing it with the text "A sign mounted perpendicular to the building facade." 

and by deleting the text following the definition of Sign "Any device designed to inform or 
attract the attention of persons not on the premises on which the device is located. In addition, 
any exterior building surfaces which are internally illuminated or decorated with gaseous tube or 
other lights are considered signs" and replacing it with the text "A sign shall consist of any of the 
following elements: 

a. Lettering, words, numerals, emblems, trademarks, logos, images, drawings, 
pictures, graphics, pennants, streamers, or other devices of any material or 
construction, however displayed, whether as an independent structure or as part of 
a building or other structure or object; 

b. Any visual device designed to inform, attract or draw the attention of persons 
outside the premises on which the device is located, including messages within or 
attached to windows and doors; 

c. Any exterior building surface that is internally illuminated or decorated with 
gaseous tubing, LED displays or back lighting." 

and by deleting the text following the definition of Sign Area "Sign area shall mean the area of 
the smallest horizontally or vertically oriented rectangle which could enclose all the display area 
of the sign, together with any backing different in color or material from the finish material of 
the building face without deduction for open space or other irregularities. Structural members 
not bearing advertising matter shall not be included unless internally or decoratively lighted. 
Only one side of flat, back-to-back signs need be included in calculating sign area" and replacing 
it with the text "The area of the smallest horizontal or vertical rectangle enclosing the entire 
display area of the sign. The display area of a sign is the entire area, different in color or 
composition from the facade or common trim of the building, used to frame or provide a 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

background for the sign. The display area may contain open space and irregular shapes if they 
are part of the sign. The display area shall also include internally illuminated, back-lit or 
decoratively lighted sign support structures if such elements are present. The area of double- 
sided signs shall be calculated using the area of only one face of the sign." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-Laws, or 
take any other action related thereto, or take any action related thereto. 

On request of the Design Review Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 37 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more that a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Customary Home Occupation - Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 10.0 Definitions under Customary 
Home Occupation in the Andover Zoning By-law by deleting the text "the display or exterior 
announcement of the home occupation except for a single unlighted sign affixed to the residence 
no larger than two square feet; the sign shall conform in all other ways to the relevant portions of 
the Town bylaws", and by replacing the text with "the signage shall conform to the Zoning 
Bylaw Section 5.2. Signs", 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-Laws, or 
take any other action related thereto, or take any action related thereto. 

On request of the Design Review Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 38 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more that a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Additional Design Criteria - Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 9.6.3 in the Andover Zoning By- 
law by replacing the text "6 square feet" with "four (4) square feet" and inserting the text "a new 
structure built by or for the use of the Town of Andover in any district" before "; provided, 
however, that the lack of a report from the DRB shall not be sufficient reason to delay action on 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

a proposal which otherwise could be acted upon by the Building Inspector, Special Permit 
Granting Authority or Board of Appeals." and inserting the subsection "5. For signs: refer to 
Section 5.2.4.2. and 5.2.15. for additional design criteria" following Section 9.6.4. sub-section 4. 

And further that +non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted 
in order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-Laws, or 
take any other action related thereto, or take any action related thereto. 

On request of the Design Review Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 39 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more that a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Notification of Annual Property Taxes - General Bylaw Amendment 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Bylaws, Article III, Section 
3(a)(3), by adding the following four sentences after the current sentence in this section: 

"In addition, each property owner in Town will be provided, either by letter or via a secure 
electronic means, at least ten (10) calendar days before the first scheduled business session of the 
Annual Town Meeting and at least seven (7) calendar days before the first scheduled business 
session of a Special Town Meeting, a table showing the precise dollar amount that a resident's 
annual property taxes on their particular piece of property in Town will either increase or 
decrease associated with an approval of each Article in the Warrant that affects property taxes 
should those Articles be approved at the Town Meeting. The table will also show the total actual 
dollar amount that a property owner's respective tax bill will either increase or decrease if all 
Articles in the Warrant were to be approved. The Finance Committee shall be assisted by the 
office of the Town Manager and his/her departmental staffs in making the calculations for each 
piece of property and insuring that this information is provided, as required above, to every 
property owner. This information will be provided to Town residents starting with the Finance 
Committee Report to be prepared for the 2010 Town Meeting." 

And further, that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this bylaw be permitted in order 
that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of Bylaws, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of Robert Pokress and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to amend the Town By- 
Laws, Article III, Section 3(a)(3) by adding the following after the current sentence in this 
section: 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

"In addition, each property owner in Town will be provided, either by letter or via a secure 
electronic means, at least 10 calendar days before the first Scheduled business session of the 
Annual Town Meeting and at least seven calendar days before the first scheduled business 
session of a Special Town Meeting, a table showing the dollar amount that a resident's annual 
property taxes on their particular piece of property in Town are projected to either increase or 
decrease associated with an approval of each Article in the Warrant that affects property taxes 
should those Articles be approved at the Town meeting. The table will also show the total 
projected dollar amount that a property owner's respective tax bill will either increase or 
decrease if all Articles in the Warrant were to be approved. 

This calculation each year will incorporate the Town's estimate of revenues from new growth for 
the coming fiscal year, the then current relative property valuations, and the then current tax 
classification. The Finance Committee shall be assisted by the office of the Town Manager and 
his/her departmental staffs in making the calculations for each piece of property and insuring that 
this information is provided, as required above, to every property owner. This information will 
be provided to Town residents starting with the Finance Committee Report to be prepared for the 
2010 Town Meeting." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in order 
that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-Laws, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

VOTE: Article 40 was Defeated Declared less than a Majority by the Moderator 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

Five-year Projection of Expected Budget Expenditures - General Bylaw Amendment 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Bylaws, Article III, Section 
3(a) by creating the following new subsection to Section 3(a): 

"A report by the Finance Committee, prepared with the assistance of the Town Manager and the 
School Superintendent, to become part of the Finance Committee Report being sent out in 
advance of Town Meeting, showing, by year, a five-year projection of all expected budget 
expenditures (operating budget and capital budget) based on the proposed operating budget plus 
existing debt exclusion items that have remaining expenditure obligations over the course of this 
five-year budget forecast window. The Town Manager and School Superintendent will each 
provide a written report to accompany the five-year forecast describing their respective budget 
projections and the assumptions they used in making their respective projections. This budget 
forecast will be provided to Town residents starting with the Finance Committee Report to be 
prepared for the 2010 Town Meeting." 

And further, that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this bylaw be permitted in order 
that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of Bylaws, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of Robert Pokress and others 
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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Town vote to amend the Town By- 
Laws, Article III, Section 3(a) by creating the following new subsection to Section 3(a):"The 
Finance Committee shall, with the assistance of the Town Manager and School Superintendent, 
annually prepare a five year, non-binding financial forecast which projects revenues, revenue 
sources and expenditures for the coming next five years. The forecast shall include all elements 
of revenue, operating expense and debt service. 

The financial forecast shall be completed in time to be incorporated in the Finance Committee 
Report being sent out in advance of Town Meeting, published on the Town's Web site and in any 
other media as the Finance Committee may so designate. 

The Finance Committee shall update the forecast as deemed necessary, but in no event less than 
once every year. 

The Town Manager and School Superintendent will each provide a written report to accompany 
the five year forecast describing their respective budget projections and the assumptions they 
used in making their respective projections. This budget forecast will be provided to Town 
residents starting with the Finance Committee Report to be prepared for the 2010 Town 
Meeting." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in order 
that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-Laws, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Article 41 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: YES: 87 NO: 177 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

Town and School Labor Contracts - General Bylaw Amendment 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Bylaws, Article IV, by adding a 
new section that states the following: 

"Neither the Town nor the School Committee shall enter into any multi-year employment or 
labor contracts that obligate the Town to future year annual operating budget expenditures that 
will exceed the then-in-force voter-approved operating budgets for the corresponding budget 
items at the then-in-force voter-approved staffing levels. The intent of this bylaw shall not be 
subverted via budget item manipulations or other means that bypass this bylaw such as defining 
job positions, redefining compensation, benefit or other contract provisions or the redefining of 
budget categories." 

And further, that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this bylaw be permitted in order 
that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of Bylaws, or take any 
other action related thereto. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

On request of Robert Pokress and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to amend the Town By- 
Laws, Article IV by adding a new section that states the following: "Neither the Town nor the 
School Committee shall enter into employment or labor contracts that obligate the Town to 
future year annual operating budget expenditures that will exceed the then-in-force voter- 
approved operating budgets for the corresponding budget line items, at the equivalent staffing 
levels, without the approval by the Town's voters at an Annual Town Meeting or Special Town 
Meeting."And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted 
in order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-Laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to close debate. 
The motion passed by a 2/3 vote. 

VOTE: Article 42 was defeated Declared less than a Majority by the Moderator 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
School Committee Report: Disapproval 

Accumulation of Unused Sick Leave Benefits for Town and School Employees - General 
Bylaw Amendment 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Bylaws, Article IV, by adding a 
new section that states the following: 

"Neither the Town nor the School Department will enter into labor contracts that allow for the 
accumulation of unused annual paid sick leave. Annual sick leave allotments will conform to 
private sector norms for annual paid sick leave, and in no case shall exceed 15 days paid sick 
leave per year. To cover legitimate illness situations that may exceed an employee's annual sick 
leave allotment, the Town and School Department shall employ long-term disability insurance 
policies that will take affect for employees who have legitimate illnesses creating long-term 
disability situations. The intent of this bylaw shall not be violated via re-definitions of 
employment provisions, contract terminology, sick leave terminology or contract provisions. 
Contracts in effect at the time of passage of this bylaw shall be grandfathered and existing 
accumulated sick leave 'on the books' at the time of passage of this bylaw shall be 'burned off 
over a ten-year period so that by ten years after passage of this bylaw, no employee will have 
more than their annual allotment of paid sick days 'on the books'." 

And further, that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this bylaw be permitted in order 
that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of Bylaws, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of Robert Pokress and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to amend the Town By- 
Laws, Article IV by adding a new section that states the following: "Neither the Town nor the 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26. 27, 28 2009 

School Department will enter into labor or management employment contracts that allow for the 
accumulation from one year to the next of unused paid sick leave. Annual sick leave allotments 
will conform to private sector norms for paid sick time off. 

The intent of this by-law shall not be violated via redefinitions of employment provisions, 
contract terminology, sick leave terminology or other contract provisions. Contracts in effect at 
the time of passage of this by-law shall be grandfathered and existing accumulated sick leave 'on 
the books' at the time of passage of this by-law shall be 'burned off over a reasonable period of 
time beyond the expiration of current contracts so that by ten years after passage of this by-law, 
no employee will have more than their annual allotment of paid sick days 'on the books'. 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in order 
that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-Laws, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Article 43 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: YES: 98 NO: 144 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

Payment of Sick Leave Benefits for Town and School Employees - General Bylaw 
Amendment 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Bylaws, Article IV, by adding a 
new section that states the following: 

"Neither the Town nor the School Department shall enter into labor agreements that allow for the 
payment of any unused sick leave upon an employee's resignation from Town or School 
Department employment or retirement from Town or School Department employment. In 
addition, to the extent of that contract in force at the time of the adoption of this bylaw contain 
such obligations, until those contracts expire, the Town and School Department will include the 
costs of meeting those obligations as part of their overall budget Article being submitted for 
voter approval at Town Meeting and NOT as a separate Article that requests approval for the 
payment of those obligations as an additional Town expense items over and above the proposed 
Town/School Department Operating Budget Article. The intent of this bylaw shall not be 
subverted via re-definitions of employment provisions, contract terminology, sick leave 
terminology or other contract compensation-related provisions." 

And further, that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this bylaw be permitted in order 
that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of Bylaws, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of Robert Pokress and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to amend the Town By- 
Laws, Article IV by adding a new section that states the following: "Neither the Town nor the 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

School Department shall enter into labor or management employment contracts that allow for the 
payment of any unused sick leave upon an employee's resignation or retirement from Town or 
School Department employment or retirement from Town or School Department employment. 
Existing obligations under current contracts will be paid off by the expiration of those contracts 
and will not be carried forward into any new contracts. 

In addition, to the extent that contracts in force at the time of the adoption of this by-law contain 
such obligations, until those contracts expire, the Town and School Department will include the 
costs of meeting those obligations as part of their overall operating budget being submitted for 
voter approval at Town Meeting and NOT as a separate Article that requests approval for the 
payment of those obligations as an additional Town expense to be paid either via additional 
taxation or out of the Town's Free Cash or out of the Stabilization Fund. The intent of this by- 
law shall not be subverted via redefinitions of employment provisions, contract terminology, sick 
leave terminology or other contract compensation-related provisions." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in order 
that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-Laws, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

VOTE: Article 44 was defeated Declared less than a Majority by the Moderator 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
School Committee Report: Disapproval 

Stabilization Fund - Greater Lawrence Technical School 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 71, Section I6GV2 which approves the establishment of a Stabilization Fund for 
the Greater Lawrence Technical School, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Greater Lawrence Technical District School Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 
Article 45 as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 11:00 P.M., until 
Thursday, May 28 at 7:00 P.M. at the Collins Center Auditorium, Andover High School, 
Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - May 28, 2009 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed three hundred sixty three (363) voters were 
admitted to the meeting. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

The meeting was called to order at 7:01 P.M. by Sheila M. Doherty, Moderator. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit twelve (12) non- voters to the meeting and to escort 
non- voters to the non- voter section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced various housekeeping issues to the meeting members, including 
turning off cell phones, the introduction of the Ombudsman, Christopher Vrountas, the use of 
Pro and Con Microphones, time limits, the location of microphones, stage participants and the 
location of voting sections. 

Street Acceptances 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way any or all of the 
following streets: Barron Court and Black Horse Lane as further described below: 

Barron Court, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board entitled 
"DEFINITIVE CLUSTER SUBDIVISION LAYOUT PLAN ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 
BIRMINGHAM ESTATES", dated February 5, 2003 (revised) and recorded in the Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 14528. 

Black Horse Lane, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board entitled, 
"Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. entitled Black Horse Lane" dated February 21, 
2001 (revised) and recorded in the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 14174. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town 
approve Article 46 as printed in the Warrant. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission Report: Approval 

United States Postal Service Lease at the Town House 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to renew the lease 
of space in the Andover Town House, 20 Main Street, to the United States Postal Service for a 
term not to exceed ten years, under such terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen deem to 
be in the best interest of the Town, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manger 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 47 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: YES: 105 NO: 80 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Parking Program 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the balance of $23,890.67 from Article 
47, 2006 Parking Program and appropriate $23,890.67 for the purpose of installing and/or 
replacing parking meters including costs incidental, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Police Chief 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 
Article 48 as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Sewer Expansion - Chester Street, Mitton Circle, Oak Street & parts of Tewksbury Street 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $850,000 for the 
extension of a sanitary sewer line, including costs incidental and related thereto, on Chester 
Street, Mitton Circle, Oak Street, and parts of Tewksbury Street and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire any necessary easements by gift, purchase or eminent domain and that to 
raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized 
to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(1) of the General Laws, or any 
other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefore; sewer betterments 
are to be assessed by the Board of Selectmen, acting in its capacity as Sewer Commissioners, 
based upon the uniform unit method, or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Cristen Farrell and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to WITHDRAW Article 49 from the 
Warrant by a Majority Vote. 

Reconstruction of Sherbourne Street Sidewalk 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $24,000 to pay costs of 
reconstructing the sidewalks on Sherbourne Street from Ayer Road to William Street for the 
payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet the appropriation, the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under 
and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses (5) and (6) of the Massachusetts General laws, or 
any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefore, or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On petition of Michael L. Rivet and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that that the sum of $24,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of reconstructing the sidewalks on Sherbourne Street from Ayer Road 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

to William Street and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto, and that to 
meet the appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized 
to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses (5) and (6) of the 
General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 50 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

Heffron Right-of-Wav - Petition to the General Court 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to submit the following petition to the General 
Court: 

Notwithstanding the provisions of Chapter 30, Chapter 3 OB, Chapter 41, and Chapter 149 
of the General Laws, Chapter 213 of the Acts of 2000, Chapter 372 of the Acts of 2000, or any 
other general or special law to the contrary: 

(a) the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover and the Conservation Commission of the 
Town and the School Committee of the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High 
School may grant and accept easements in real estate and may grant and accept conveyances of 
real estate lying between River Road and the Merrimack River as shown on the plan entitled 
"Proposed Conveyance Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts," dated April 17, 1995, Revised 
January 12, 2009, by Dana F. Perkins, Inc. on file in the office of the Town Clerk and within 
parcels C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J and K as appearing on said plan, and the final location of Parcels J 
and K as appearing on said plan and the final location of any easements or conveyances within 
Parcels C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, and K as appearing on said plan shall be determined by the Board 
of Selectmen, the Conservation Commission and the School Committee of the Greater Lawrence 
Regional Vocational Technical High School in consultation and agreement with the Trustees of 
Phillips Academy; and 

(b) said Board of Selectmen of said Town, said Conservation Commission, and said School 
Committee may enter into one or more agreements or ratify any existing agreement with the 
Trustees of Phillips Academy, including a management agreement, upon such terms as said 
Board of Selectmen and said Conservation Commission deem to be in the best interest of said 
Town and are mutually agreed to by the Town, the School Committee of the Greater Lawrence 
Regional Vocational Technical High School and the Trustees of Phillips Academy; and 

(c) the agreements may include provisions for improvements to and maintenance of the real 
estate, and for monitoring and controlling access to the real estate mentioned in this section. 

The General Court may vary the form and substance of the requested legislation within 
the scope of the general public objectives of the petition, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 51 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared Unanimous by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission Report: Approval 

Repairs to Private Ways - General Bylaw Amendment 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws for the Town of 
Andover by adding the following section to Article XII, Miscellaneous Bylaws: 

Section . Temporary Repairs to Private Ways 

In accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40, Section 
6N, the Town may make temporary repairs on private ways under the following conditions: 

1. The type and extent of the repairs authorized by this bylaw shall be any and all repairs, 
including drainage work, necessary for safe and convenient travel by the public, up to and 
including work that would be required to make the private way suitable to be accepted as a 
public way. 

2. The Director of Public Works, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, shall 
authorize such repairs, and shall determine whether the repairs are required by public necessity. 

3. Not fewer than 75 percent of the abutters to the private ways must petition for such 
repairs. 

4. Betterment charges shall be assessed for the repairs according to the uniform unit 
method. 

5. The Town shall not be liable in any manner or amounts on account of any damages 
caused by such repairs. 

6. Such repairs shall be performed only on ways that have been open to public use for at 
least 6 years, as determined by the Board of Selectmen. 

7. No repairs or improvements shall be done on any private ways where the owners of 
private ways or their predecessors in interest have agreed by covenant, Planning Board Decision, 
or any municipal board decision or other form of agreement that the Town shall not provide 
street repair or improvement services. 

8. The Director of Public Works, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, shall 
determine if a cash deposit shall be required for such repairs and, if a cash deposit is required, the 
amount of such deposit. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town 
approve Article 52 as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Paving of Pine Tree Lane 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of 
$25,000, or such lesser sum as may be needed, for the purpose of making roadway 
improvements, i.e. paving Pine Tree Lane, said work to be performed to the specifications of the 
Town. Betterments are to be assessed equally to each parcel on Pine Tree Lane. 

On petition of David Whitefield and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to WITHDRAW Article 53 from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Repaying and Improvements to Fosters Pond Road and Pomeroy Road 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of 
$50,000 or such lesser sum as may be needed for the purpose of repaying and making 
improvements of Fosters Pond and Pomeroy Roads; said work to be performed to the 
specifications of the Town. Betterments are to be assessed. 

On request of James Cyrier and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to WITHDRAW Article 54 from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Town Building Maintenance and Renovation 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $650,000 for the purpose of 
paying costs of constructing, adding to, remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary 
repairs to and equipping various Town buildings and roofs and for the payment of all other costs 
incidental and related thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $650,000 is hereby 
appropriated for the purpose of paying costs of constructing, adding to, remodeling, 
reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to and equipping various Town buildings and 
roofs and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to 
borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses (5) and (6) of the General 
Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

School Building Maintenance and Renovation 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $850,000 for the purpose of 
paying costs of constructing, adding to, remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary 
repairs to and equipping various School buildings and roofs and for the payment of all other 
costs incidental and related thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $850,000 is hereby 
appropriated for the purpose of paying costs of constructing, adding to, remodeling, 
reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to and equipping various School buildings and 
roofs and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to 
borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (3 A) of the General Laws, 
or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

New Ballfields- Blanchard Street 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $425,000 for the purpose of 
paying costs of engineering, designing and constructing ballfields at the Town-owned site on 
Blanchard Street and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27. 28 2009 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $425,000 is hereby 
appropriated for the purpose of paying costs of engineering, designing and constructing ballfields 
at the Town-owned site on Blanchard Street and for the payment of all other costs incidental and 
related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, 
Clause (25) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds 
or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

Veterans Memorial Auditorium Repairs and Renovations 

ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $650,000 for the purpose 
paying costs of designing, constructing, remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary 
repairs to Veterans Memorial Auditorium and for the payment of all other costs incidental and 
related thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $650,000 is hereby 
appropriated for the purpose of paying costs of designing, constructing, remodeling, 
reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to Veterans War Memorial Auditorium and for 
the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum 
under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (3 A) of the General Laws, or pursuant to 
any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

Feasibility Study/Schematic Design - Bancroft Elementary School - $735,000 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate, borrow or transfer from available 
funds, $735,000 to be expended under the direction of the School Building Committee for the 
purpose of conducting a Feasibility Study: (1) to understand the extent of deficiencies identified 
in the Statement of Interest submitted to the Massachusetts School Building Authority for the 
Bancroft Elementary School, located at 15 and 21 Bancroft Road, Andover, MA and as shown 
on Andover Assessor Map 59, lots 29 and 29A; and (2) to begin to explore the formulation of a 
solution to the deficiencies which are relevant to the Statement of Interest for Bancroft 
Elementary School which solutions may include options to alleviate the overcrowding at 
Shawsheen Elementary School; and for which feasibility study the Town may be eligible for a 

193 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

grant from the Massachusetts School Building Authority and to authorize the Town to indemnify 
and hold harmless the MSBA for claims arising out of the implementations of the Feasibility 
Study and the MSBA grant. The MSBA's grant program is a non-entitlement, discretionary 
program based on need, as determined by the MSBA, and any costs the Town incurs in 
connection with the feasibility study in excess of any grant approved by and received from the 
MSBA shall be the sole responsibility of the Town and that the amount of borrowing authorized 
pursuant to this vote shall be reduced by any grant amount set forth in the Feasibility Study 
Agreement that may be executed between the Town and the MSBA, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the School Building Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that the Town appropriate, $525,000 to 
be expended under the direction of the School Building Committee for the purpose of conducting 
a Feasibility Study: (1) to understand the extent of deficiencies identified in the Statement of 
Interest submitted to the Massachusetts School Building Authority for the Bancroft Elementary 
School, located at 15 and 21 Bancroft Road, Andover, MA and as shown on Andover Assessor 
Map 59, lots 29 and 29 A; and (2) to begin to explore the formulation of a solution to the 
deficiencies which are relevant to the Statement of Interest for Bancroft Elementary School 
which solutions may include options to alleviate the overcrowding at Shawsheen Elementary 
School; and for which feasibility study the Town may be eligible for a grant from the 
Massachusetts School Building Authority and to authorize the Town to indemnify and hold 
harmless the MSBA for claims arising out of the implementations of the Feasibility Study and 
the MSBA grant; that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen is authorized to borrow said amount under and pursuant to Chapter 44 and Chapter 
70B of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority and to issue bonds or notes 
of the Town therefor. The MSBA's grant program is a non-entitlement, discretionary program 
based on need, as determined by the MSBA, and any costs the Town incurs in connection with 
the feasibility study in excess of any grant approved by and received from the MSBA shall be the 
sole responsibility of the Town and that the amount of borrowing authorized pursuant to this vote 
shall be reduced by any grant amount set forth in the Feasibility Study Agreement that may be 
executed between the Town and the MSBA. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to close debate. 
The motion passed by a 2/3 vote. 

Article 59 was APPROVED. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

Feasibility Study/Schematic Design - Bancroft Elementary School - $320,000 

ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate, borrow or transfer from available 
funds, $320,000 to be expended under the direction of the School Building Committee for the 

194 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

purpose of conducting a Feasibility Study: (1) to understand the extent of deficiencies identified 
in the Statement of Interest submitted to the Massachusetts School Building Authority for the 
Bancroft Elementary School, located at 15 and 21 Bancroft Road, Andover, MA and as shown 
on Andover Assessor Map 59, lots 29 and 29A; and (2) to begin to explore the formulation of a 
solution to the deficiencies which are relevant to the Statement of Interest for Bancroft 
Elementary School; and for which feasibility study the Town may be eligible for a grant from the 
Massachusetts School Building Authority and to authorize the Town to indemnify and hold 
harmless the MSBA for claims arising out of the implementations of the Feasibility Study and 
the MSBA grant. The MSBA's grant program is a non-entitlement, discretionary program based 
on need, as determined by the MSBA, and any costs the Town incurs in connection with the 
feasibility study in excess of any grant approved by and received from the MSBA shall be the 
sole responsibility of the Town and that the amount of borrowing authorized pursuant to this vote 
shall be reduced by any grant amount set forth in the Feasibility Study Agreement that may be 
executed between the Town and the MSBA, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the School Building Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to WITHDRAW Article 60 from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Increase Demand Fee 

ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to charge for each written demand issues by the 
Collector a fee of $15.00 to be added to and collected as part of the tax, as authorized by 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 60, Section 15, effective July 1, 2009 or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to approve Article 61 
as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Open Space Land Acquisition 

ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $800,000 for the 
acquisition (and costs incidental to such acquisition) of land, conservation restrictions, easements 
or other contractual rights for conservation purposes under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 
8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, to be managed and controlled by the Conservation 
Commission, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen and Conservation Commission to acquire 
such land and restrictions, easements and rights by gift, option, lease, purchase or eminent 
domain, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3) of 
the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefore, or take any other action related thereto. 



195 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

On petition of Donald Cooper, Chairman of the Conservation Commission and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to WITHDRAW Article 62 from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Temporary Moratorium on Wireless Communication Facilities-Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 6.1 of the Zoning Bylaw by 
adding a temporary (six month) moratorium on the permitting construction of cell towers in 
order to provide the Town time to evaluate its zoning bylaws in light of the mandates of the 
General Telecommunications Act by adding the following new Section 6.1.12 as follows: 

"Section 6.1.12 - Temporary Moratorium on Wireless Communications Facilities including 
Towers, Antennas and Related Equipment used for transmitting or receiving telecommunications 
signals within the Town. 

6.1.12.1 Purpose. 

The purpose of the temporary moratorium is to give the Town time to conduct a comprehensive 
study to review, re-evaluate and consider possible amendments to the current provisions of this 
Bylaw governing the permitting and construction of new Wireless Communications Facilities, to 
adequately and appropriately address the concerns of the Town that such current provisions of 
this Bylaw are no longer adequate for the appropriate regulations of the rapidly changing 
technologies and service demands of the wireless communications industry in a manner 
consistent with the Federal Telecommunications Act of 1 996 (the "Telecom Act"). 

6.1.12.3 Temporary Moratorium Provisions. 

For so long as this temporary moratorium remains in effect, no wireless communications facility 
or structure appurtenant or accessory to a wireless communication facility shall be constructed, 
nor shall any building permit, special permit, variance or site plan approval decision for any such 
facility be issued in the Town of Andover. 

6.1.12.4 Temporary Moratorium Expiration. 

Unless extended, continued or modified by a subsequent action of Town Meeting, the provisions 
of this temporary moratorium shall expire upon either of the first to occur of: (a) the adoption by 
Town Meeting of (i) any amendment to Section 6.10 or (ii) any other amendment to this Bylaw's 
wireless communications provisions that explicitly rescinds or replaces this moratorium, and the 
approval of any such amendment(s) by the Massachusetts Attorney General, or (b) October 27, 
2009. 

6.1.12.5 Exemptions. 

Wireless Communications Facilities and upgrades thereto, that are currently allowed without a 
special permit as provided in Section 6.1.10 (Modifications by Special Permit Granting 
Authority) are exempt from the provisions of this temporary moratorium." 

On petition of Pamela Dunn and Aileen Peters and others 

196 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to WITHDRAW Article 63 from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Wireless Facilities - Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

ARTICLE 64. To see if the town will vote to amend Section 6.1 of the Zoning Bylaw for 
Wireless Communications Facilities as follows: 

Add to Section 6.1.3 

4. A report by a qualified Radio Frequency Engineer relating to (1) a claimed substantial 
gap in coverage and (2) the proposed facility's compliance with applicable Federal 
Communication Commission, Massachusetts Aeronautics Commission and Federal 
Aviation Commission requirements, and (3) coverage maps that include all of the 
applicant's existing and planned towers, antennas, micro-cells and repeaters in the 
coverage area and abutting municipalities. 

5. Evidence that there is no alternative site that is available and technically feasible in 
Andover or an abutting municipality. Such evidence shall include an analysis by a 
qualified Radio Frequency Engineer of the gaps in coverage if other sites were to be used. 
If there is an alternative site which would provide a location to close the purported 
substantial gap in coverage, then the applicant must document all efforts, and results 
thereof, to evaluate, and obtain rights to use the alternative site. 

6. Evidence that the applicant has analyzed the feasibility of using "repeaters", microcells, 
or other available technology to provide coverage to the intended service area. 

7. The applicant shall provide written documentation of any facility sites in the town and in 
abutting towns or cities in which it has a legal or equitable interest, whether by 
ownership, leasehold or otherwise. Said documentation shall demonstrate that these 
facility sites do not already provide, or do not have the potential to provide by site 
adjustment, adequate coverage. 

8. A copy of the most recently recorded plan and deed for the property on which the Facility 
will be placed and specific documentation which shows that the applicant has the legal 
authority by way of ownership, purchase and sale agreement, lease or otherwise, to use 
the subject property for the intended purpose. 

9. Certification by a structural engineer that the proposed Wireless Communications Facility 
is structurally sound. 

10. Design details for the foundation of a proposed tower, the connection of the proposed 
tower to the foundation and the breakaway points of the proposed tower. 

11. A balloon or crane test, and a report thereon as to the aesthetic effect of a proposed tower, 
are required for a proposed tower. Within two weeks following the first public hearing, a 
test shall occur in accordance with the following requirements. The applicant shall notify 
the Special Permit Granting Authority at least 5 business days in advance of such test. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

1 . A three foot diameter brightly colored balloon or crane shall be at the maximum 
height and at the location of the proposed tower. 

2. The balloon or crane will remain in place for at least eight (8) hours during 
daylight hours. 

3. At least five (5) business days prior to the test, the applicant shall cause notice of 
the test to be published in a newspaper of general circulation in the Town." 

Add to 6.1.5 

"As is required by the Federal Telecommunications Act of 1996, there may be no 
regulation of the telecommunication facilities on the basis of the environmental effects of radio 
frequency emissions, other than as required by the Federal Communications Commission." 

Add 6.1.12 Notice of Settlement Discussion 

"At least ten (10) days prior to each public hearing of the Special Permit Granting 
Authority where a public discussion is to occur regarding any proposed settlement of pending 
litigation relating to an application under this section, the Special Permit Granting Authority 
shall send notice of such public discussion by first class mail to all abutters within 300 feet of the 
proposed Facility." 
Add 6.1.13 Report of Compliance 

"Prior to operation of the Facility, an engineer must submit a report to the Building 
Inspector, stipulating that the Wireless Communication Facility as constructed is in compliance 
with the Federal Communications Commission requirements and was constructed in accordance 
with the plans as approved by the Special permit Granting Authority. This report shall be 
submitted within ten (10) days of completion of construction of the Facility." 

And further, that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this bylaw be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of Bylaws, or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Pamela Dunn and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 64 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared Unanimous by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Water Treatment Plant Roof Replacement 

ARTICLE 65. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing, or transfer from available 
funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $750,000 for the purpose of paying 

198 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

costs of replacing and repairing the Water Treatment Plant roof and for the payment of all other 
costs incidental and related thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of Director of Public Works 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer 
$650,000 from Article 20, 2003 Annual Town Meeting Water Treatment Plant Improvements 
and appropriate the sum of $650,000 for the purpose of paying costs of replacing and repairing 
the Water Treatment Plant roof and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related 
thereto. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Priority Development Site 

ARTICLE 66. To see if the Town will accept the provisions of Chapter 43 D of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, pursuant to Section 1 1 of Chapter 205 of the Acts of 
2006 and to approve the filing of an application with the Interagency Permitting Board for the 
designation of the following land at: 

1 Riverside Drive - Map 126, Parcel 4B 

2 Tech Drive - Map 166, Parcel 15 
40 Shattuck Road - Map 167, Parcel 15B 
300 Minuteman Road - Map 165, Parcel 4 
300 Brickstone Square - Map 35, Parcel 27 
160 Dascomb Road - Map 203, Parcel 1 
300 Federal Street - Map 144, Parcel 3 
800 Federal Street - Map 145, Parcel 10 

as a Priority Development Site, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 
Article 66 as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Board Report: Approval 

National Flood Insurance Program - Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

ARTICLE 67. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, Section 
8.2, Flood Hazard Overlay District, by adding Section 8.2.6. as follows: 



199 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

8.2.6. (1) Base Flood Elevation Data. Base flood elevation data is required for subdivision 

proposals or other developments for land area containing more than 50 lots or for 
land area greater than 5 acres within unnumbered A zones as determined by the 
Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). 

8.2.6. (2) Other Use Regulations: All subdivision proposals must be designed to assure 

that: 

a) such proposals minimize flood damage; 

b) all public utilities and facilities are located and constructed to minimize or 
eliminate flood damage; and 

c) adequate drainage is provided to reduce exposure to flood hazards. 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-Laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Inspector of Buildings 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 67 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Board of Health Report: Approval 

Street Acceptance and Taking - Fun Flight Circle 

ARTICLE 68. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, gift, purchase or otherwise, any fee, easement, or 
other interest in the following described roadway, and any easement related thereto, and to award 
no damages for said eminent domain taking, the way known as Fun Flight Circle, as shown on 
Plan of Land entitled, "Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts, of Fun Flight 
Circle, Scale: 1" = 40', Date: March 24, 1989, Engineers: Dana F. Perkins & Associates, Inc., 
Civil Engineers & Surveyors, Tewksbury & Reading, Mass., Owner: Picwel Builders, 54 
Andover Street, Andover, Massachusetts," which plan is recorded with Essex North District 
Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 1 1630, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 68 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Board Report: Approval 

200 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Granli Drive Easements - Petition to the General Court 

ARTICLE 69. To see if the Town will vote to submit the following petition to the General 
Court: 

Notwithstanding the provisions of Article 97 of the Constitution of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts or any general or special law to the contrary, the Conservation Commission of the 
Town of Andover may grant the following easements as shown on Plan entitled, "Street 
Acceptance Plan of Granli Drive in Andover, Mass. dated December 16, 1988, drawn by Dana F. 
Perkins & Associates, Inc., Tewksbury, Massachusetts" to the Board of Selectmen of the Town 
of Andover. 

A permanent water easement, shown as "30' Water Easement" on Parcel A on Plan 
entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of Granli Drive in Andover, Mass. dated December 16, 1988, 
drawn by Dana F. Perkins & Associates, Inc., Tewksbury, Massachusetts," to which plan 
reference may be made for a more particular description of said easement. 

A permanent drainage easement, shown as "30' Drainage Easement" on Parcel A and 
situated between Lot 15 and Lot 16 on plan entitled, "Street Acceptance Plan of Granli Drive in 
Andover, Mass. dated December 16, 1988, drawn by Dana F. Perkins & Associates, Inc., 
Tewksbury, Massachusetts" to which plan reference may be made for a more particular 
description of said easement. 

A permanent drainage easement shown as "30' Drainage Easement" on Parcel A and 
situated behind Lot 20 and Lot 21 on plan entitled, "Street Acceptance Plan of Granli Drive in 
Andover, Mass. dated December 16, 1988, drawn by Dana F. Perkins & Associates, Inc., 
Tewksbury, Massachusetts" to which plan reference may be made for a more particular 
description of said easement. 

The General Court may vary the form and substance of the requested legislation within 
the scope of the general public objectives of the petition, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 69 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared Unanimous by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Street Acceptance and Taking - West Hollow 

ARTICLE 70. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, gift, purchase or otherwise, any fee, easement, or 
other interest in the following described roadway and related property and easements, and to 
award no damages for said eminent domain taking: 

201 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

1. The street known as West Hollow and shown as Lot 67 on Land Court Plan No. 1462- 
1 1 (sheets 1 through 4) filed in the Essex County North District Land Registration Office in Land 
Court Registration Book 91, Page 361, being a copy of a portion of a plan entitled "Subdivision 
Plan of Land in Andover, MA" prepared by Beals & Thomas, Inc. consisting of sheets 1-14 
dated April 29, 1994, as revised and approved by the Planning Board of the Town of Andover, 
which plan is filed with the Land Court in Boston (together, the "Plan"). 

2. Lots 69 and 70 on said Land Court Plan 1462-1 1. All of the boundaries of said Lots 
are determined by the Court to be located as shown on said Subdivision Plan of Land in 
Andover, drawn by Beals and Thomas, Inc., Surveyors, dated April 29, 1994, as modified and 
approved by the Court, filed in the Essex County North District Land Registration Office, a copy 
of which is filed with the Certificate of Title No. 1 2089. 

3. As appurtenant to said Lots 67, 69 and 70, the perpetual right and easement to use and 
to access (i) those areas shown or designated as "Utility Easement," "Access and Utility 
Easement," "Drainage and Utility Easement" or "Sewer Easement" either on the Plan or on that 
certain Easement and Restriction Plan dated June 28, 1994 prepared by Beals and Thomas, Inc. 
filed with said Registry District as Plan R-29 with Document No. 60205, for purposes of 
installation, maintenance, and replacement of underground utilities (together with above-ground 
structures appurtenant thereto), and (ii) those areas shown as designated on the Plan as "Drainage 
Easement" or "Drainage and Utility Easement" for purposes of maintaining and replacing the 
existing underground infiltration and drainage system (in those drainage easement areas in which 
such infiltration and drainage systems now exist), and for drainage purposes generally (in the 
other drainage easement areas), all such rights in (i) and (ii) above to be exercised so as not to 
unreasonably interfere with the use of the servient estate by the owners thereof. 

The foregoing described areas are a portion of the premises described in said Certificate 
of Title No. 11776 in Registration Book 88, Page 309 of the Essex North Registry District of 
Land Court. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 70 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission Report: Approval 

Local Option Revenues 

ARTICLE 71. To see if the Town will vote to accept any local option taxes or other revenue 
raising options which are made available to cities and towns through enactments of the 
Legislature, or take any other action related there. 

On the request of the Town Manager 
202 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 26, 27, 28 2009 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to WITHDRAW Article 71 from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel, Thomas Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a 
Majority vote to dissolve the Annual Town Meeting at 9:02 P.M. 

A true record 

ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



203 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - AUGUST 31, 2009 

INDEX 

WARRANT DESCRIPTION ACTION 

ARTICLE NO . TAKEN 

1. Statue Acceptance, MGL, Ch 64L, S. 2(a) Disapproved 

Local Option Meals Excise Tax 

2. Statue Acceptance, MGL, Ch 64L, S. 3 A Approved 

Room Occupancy Exercise Tax 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING WARRANT - AUGUST 31, 2009 

Agreeably to a warrant signed by the Selectmen, August 3, 2009, The Inhabitants of said Town 
who are qualified to vote in the Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the Collins Center 
Auditorium, Andover High School, on Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, 

Monday, August 31, 2009 

at seven o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the 
purposes stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town 
Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other public places where bills and notices are 
usually posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman . Said Warrants have been posted 
and published fourteen days. 

Ronald Bertheim 
Constable 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING AUGUST 31,2009 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed seven hundred and forty-nine (749) voters 
were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order at 7:00 P.M. by Sheila M. Doherty, Moderator. 

The Moderator asked for a moment of silence for all those residents that have passed since our 
annual meeting in May, especially Gerald H. Silverman, former Selectman, Robert King, long 
time Andover teacher and Finance Committee member and Senator Edward M. Kennedy. 

The Salute to the flag was led by Alex J. Vispoli, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen. 



204 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - AUGUST 31, 2009 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit twenty-five (25) non-voters to the meeting and to 
escort non-voters to the non- voter section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced various house keeping issues to the meeting members, including 
turning off cell phones, the order of speakers for the meeting, the location of microphones for pro 
and con positions, stage participants, the location of voting sections. 

The Moderator took a vote of the meeting members to limit presentations to five minutes and 
speakers to three minutes. The vote passed by a Majority vote. 

The Moderator explained the role of the Ombudsman at the meeting and reminded voters that the 
Ombudsman would help them with questions on Town Meeting procedures and amendments to 
articles. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with 

the reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator 
refer to the warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

Local Option Meals Excise Tax 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to accept Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 64L, 
Section 2 (a) to impose a local meals excise tax, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to close debate. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to accept Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 64L, Section 2 (a) to impose a local meals excise tax. 

Article 1 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote: 

VOTE: YES: 358 NO: 366 A Majority Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

Local Option Room Occupancy Excise Tax 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend its local room occupancy excise tax under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 64G, Section 3 A to the rate of six (6) percent, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

205 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - AUGUST 31, 2009 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to close debate. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the Town amend its local room 
occupancy excise tax under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 64G, Section 3A to the rate of 
six (6) percent by a Majority vote. 

VOTE: YES: 404 NO: 313 A Majority Vote Required 



Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 



Upon motion made by Town Counsel Thomas Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a 
Majority vote to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 8:35 P.M. 

A true record 
ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



206 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - OCTOBER 7, 2009 



INDEX 



WARRANT 
ARTICLE NO. 



DESCRIPTION 



1 . William M. Wood Memorial 

2. Private Property on Main Street Sidewalks 

GBL Amendment 

3. Outdoor Dining - GBL Amendment 

4. Sale of Building at 16 Pearson Street 

5. Acceptance of MGL Chapter 64L, Section 2(a) - Meals Tax 

Statute Acceptance - Private 

6. Amend FY-2010 Capital Projects Fund Appropriation 

7. Amend Appropriations - The Budget 

8. Transfer to Water Reserves 



ACTION 
TAKEN 



Approval 
Approval 
Approval 

Approval 
Approval 
Approval 



ATTY GEN. 



Approval 

Approval Nov. 2, 2009 



Nov. 2, 2009 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING WARRANT 
THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ESSEX, SS. 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING WARRANT - October 7, 2009 

Agreeably to a warrant signed by the Selectmen, September 18, 2009, The Inhabitants of said 
Town who are qualified to vote in the Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the Collins Field 
House, Andover High School, on Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, 

Wednesday, October 7, 2009 

at seven o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the 
purposes stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town 
Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other public places where bills and notices are 
usually posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman . Said Warrants have been posted 
and published fourteen days. 

Ronald Bertheim 
Constable 



207 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - OCTOBER 7, 2009 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed seven hundred and sixty-eight (768) voters 
were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order at 7:00 P.M. by Sheila M. Doherty, Moderator. 

The Moderator asked for a moment of silence for all those residents that have passed since our 
annual meeting in May, especially former Selectman Charles Wesson and Robert Pustell, long 
time conservation activist with the Town. 

The Salute to the flag was led by Alex J. Vispoli, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit sixty-six (66) non-voters to the meeting and to 
escort non-voters to the non- voter section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced various house keeping issues to the meeting members, including 
turning off cell phones, the order of speakers for the meeting, the location of microphones for pro 
and con positions, stage participants and the location of voting sections. 

The Moderator took a vote of the meeting members to limit presentations to five minutes and 
speakers to three minutes. The vote passed by a Majority vote. 

The Moderator explained the role of the Ombudsman at the meeting and reminded voters that the 
Ombudsman would help them with questions on Town Meeting procedures and amendments to 
articles. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator 
refer to the warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

William M. Wood Memorial 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote on Article 29 of the 1974 Town 
Meeting so that the bronze tablet in honor of William Madison Wood shall state: 

In honor of 

WILLIAM MADISON WOOD 

(1858-1926) 

William Madison Wood was the creator of Shawsheen Village and a founder and 
President of the American Woolen Company, the largest wool manufacturing 
concern of its time. An industrial genius, he learned from the difficult 
experiences of his early life and became a great benefactor of youth, a 
humanitarian with broad vision, and a public spirited citizen whose good works, 
many unpublicized, reached in all directions. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

208 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - OCTOBER 7, 2009 
On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 1 as printed in 
the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

General Bylaw Amendment - Private Property on Main Street Sidewalks 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Bylaws, Article XII, 
Section 45 as follows: 

By adding the following definitions to paragraph 2, "Definitions", to be inserted in the 
proper alphabetical order: 

Flower Pot or Planter - a decorative object used to hold flowers or plants. 

Urn - a pedestal vase typically larger than 20 inches high and used for flowers or plants. 

Window Box - A usually long, narrow box for growing plants, placed on a windowsill or 
ledge. 

By adding the following language after the words "Article XI, Sections 3(a) and 3(b) of 
the Town's Bylaws," in Paragraph 3b.: "the following are allowed as indicated:" 



3.b. 



By inserting "i." before the words "News Boxes" in the second sentence of Paragraph 



By inserting the following new section to Paragraph 3.b. 

ii. Privately owned flower pots, urns or any other decorative item may be allowed at 

locations and times specifically approved by the Board of Selectmen on a Town 
sidewalk. 

The Board of Selectmen may grant permission by means of a written license to a 
business or person to occupy a public sidewalk or way in downtown Andover for 
a limited time for the decoration of a doorway or storefront with an object(s) such 
as a flower pot, urn, planter, and window box. Window boxes that do not touch 
the ground and protrude less than one (1) foot are exempt from this policy so long 
as there is at least four (4) feet from the edge of the window box to the edge of 
sidewalk. 

Prior to seeking a license from the Board of Selectmen, a business or person 
intending to occupy any sidewalk or way at the storefront of a building, shall 
provide an image showing the object and a plan demonstrating that a travel area 
between the object and the edge of sidewalk is at least four (4) feet and is free and 
clear of any other obstructions to the Building Division and the Design Review 



209 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - OCTOBER 7, 2009 

Board. The Building Division and the Design Review Board may provide a 
verbal or written recommendation to the Board of Selectmen. 

After due consideration, a written license may be provided by the Board of 
Selectmen to the business owner or person and shall include the length of 
occupancy or time limit, the location of the object, the size of the object, and a 
picture, drawing or photo of the object. 

All window boxes, flower pots, urns or other decorative item must be kept clean, 
maintained, and free of litter. 

All items must weigh enough to ensure security and stability so as to no fall over 
or blow away. The owner is responsible for the installation, safety and 
maintenance of the item. The Town is not liable for theft of or damage to an item 
or its content. 

The business must provide insurance naming the Town as additional insured and 
written indemnification to hold the town harmless from all claims for loss or 
damage arising from such occupancy or obstruction. 

iii. Outdoor dining furniture as approved in accordance with Article XI, Section 9 - 
Outdoor Dining. 

By adding the following sub-paragraph to Paragraph 4., Enforcement: 

h. The Board of Selectmen may revoke a license issued under Section 3.b.ii. of this 

Bylaw if a violation of the license terms has occurred. 

And further, than non-substantive changes to the numbering of this Bylaw be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of Bylaws, or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 2 as printed in 
the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

General Bylaw Amendment - Outdoor Dining 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Bylaws, Article XI, Section 9, as 
follows: 

By adding the following sentence at the end of paragraph (a) (3) a: All furniture must be secured 
during the hours it is not in use. 



210 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - OCTOBER 7, 2009 
By deleting paragraph (a) (3) b. 

And further, that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this bylaw be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of Bylaws, or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 3 as printed in 
the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Sale of Building at 16 Pearson Street 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody and control of the 
building situated on the property at 16 Pearson Street to the Board of Selectmen for the purposes 
of selling or conveying the building and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell or convey 
the building on terms and conditions they deem to be in the best interest of the town, even if the 
Town receives no financial payment, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 4 as printed in 
the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more that a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Acceptance of MGL Chapter 64L, Section 2(a) - Meals Tax 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 64L, 
Section 2(a) to impose a local meals tax, or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of John F. Zipeto and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded a motion was made to move the question. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 5 as printed in 
the Warrant. 

VOTE: YES: 443 NO: 295 



211 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - OCTOBER 7, 2009 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

Amend FY-2010 Capital Projects Fund Appropriation 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend appropriations voted under Article 5 of the 
2009 Annual Town Meeting (FY-2010 Capital Projects Fund), or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the School Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the appropriation 
voted under Article 5 of the 2009 Annual Town Meeting be amended from $1,332,000 to 
$1,246,000 from taxation. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

Amend Appropriations - The Budget 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend appropriations voted under Article 4 of the 
2009 Annual Town Meeting - The Budget - or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

ARTICLE 4 - 2009 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
LINE ITEM DEPARTMENT 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 

the following sums of money for PUBLIC SAFETY by a Majority Vote: 
PUBLIC SAFETY 
1 PERSONAL SERVICES 12,736,024 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following 
sums of money for GENERAL GOVERNMENT by a Majority Vote 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

3 PERSONAL SERVICES 3,965,278 

4 OTHER EXPENSES 1,366,688 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 

the following sums of money for PUBLIC WORKS by a Majority Vote: 
PUBLIC WORKS 

5 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,588,254 

6 OTHER EXPENSES 3,570,750 



212 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - OCTOBER 7, 2009 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 

the following sums of money for PLANT AND FACILITIES by a Majority Vote: 
PLANT AND FACILITIES 

7 PERSONAL SERVICES 3,030,605 

8 OTHER EXPENSES 1,327,581 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 

the following sums of money for the LIBRARY by a Majority Vote: 
LIBRARY 

9 PERSONAL SERVICES 2,011,489 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 

money for COMMUNITY/YOUTH SERVICES/ELDER SERVICES by a Majority Vote: 

COMMUNITY / YOUTH/ ELDER SERVICES 

1 1 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,171 ,648 

12 OTHER EXPENSES 441,594 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 

the following sums of money for UNCLASSIFIED by a Majority Vote: 
UNCLASSIFIED 

14 RESERVE FUND 181,000 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following 

sums of money for ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT by a Majority Vote: 
ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPT 

15 PERSONAL SERVICES 47,601,540 

16 OTHER EXPENSES 12,126,618 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for SEWER by a Majority Vote: 
SEWER 

1 7 PERSONAL SERVICES 398, 1 1 3 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for WATER by a Majority Vote: 
WATER 

19 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,724,715 

20 OTHER EXPENSES 2,176,400 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money for GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL by a Majority Vote: 



213 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - OCTOBER 7, 2009 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

21 GREATER LAWRENCE ASSESSMENT 494,915 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 

the following sums of money for HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 
26 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 12,440,000 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

School Committee Report Approval 

Transfer to Water Reserves 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to transfer $400,000 from Article 29 of the 2009 
Annual Town Meeting - Water Main Street Construction and Re-construction - to Water 
Reserves, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer 
$400,000 from Article 29 of the 2009 Annual Town Meeting - Water Main Construction and Re- 
construction to Water Reserves. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 4 - 2009 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING * 
(as amended by Article 7- Oct 7 2009 Special Town Meeting) 
LINE 
ITEM DEPARTMENT APPROVED FY 2010 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for PUBLIC SAFETY by a Majority Vote: 
PUBLIC SAFETY 

1 PERSONAL SERVICES * 12,736,024 

2 OTHER EXPENSES 1.273.112 
TOTAL 14,009,136 

Includes $276,163 - parking receipts, $75,000 - detail fees, and $1,035,000 
- ambulance collections 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for GENERAL GOVERNMENT by a Majority Vote: 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

3 PERSONAL SERVICES * 3,965,278 

4 OTHER EXPENSES * 1.366,688 
TOTAL 5,331,966 

214 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - OCTOBER 7, 2009 

Includes $6,000 in receipts from wetland filing fees. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for PUBLIC WORKS by a Majority Vote: 
PUBLIC WORKS 

5 PERSONAL SERVICES * 1,588,254 

6 OTHER EXPENSES * 3,570,750 
TOTAL 5,159,004 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for PLANT AND FACILITIES by a Majority Vote: 
PLANT AND FACILITIES 

7 PERSONAL SERVICES * 3,030,605 

8 OTHER EXPENSES * 1,327,581 
TOTAL 4,358,186 

Includes $70,000 in rental receipts; $10,000 perpetual care income 
and $57,000 from cemetery fees 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the following sums of money for LIBRARY by a Majority Vote: 
LIBRARY 

9 PERSONAL SERVICES * 2,011,489 

10 OTHER EXPENSES 564,900 
TOTAL 2,576,389 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following 
sums of money for COMMUNITY/ YOUTH SERVICES/ELDER SERVICES by a Majority Vote: 
COMMUNITY / YOUTH/ ELDER SERVICES 

1 1 PERSONAL SERVICES * 1 , 1 7 1 ,648 

12 OTHER EXPENSES * 441,594 
TOTAL 1,613,242 

Includes $544,127; $13,760; $61,632 in user fees and $66,544 in grants 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for UNCLASSIFIED by a Majority Vote: 
UNCLASSIFIED 

13 COMPENSATION FUND 

14 RESERVE FUND* 181,000 
TOTAL 181,000 



TOWN TOTAL 33,228,923 

less budgeted Revenues (2,215,226) 



215 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - OCTOBER 7, 2009 
NET TOTAL 31,013,697 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT by a Majority Vote: 
ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPT 

15 PERSONAL SERVICES * 47,601,540 

16 OTHER EXPENSES * 12,126,618 
TOTAL 59,728,158 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for SEWER by a Majority Vote: 
SEWER 

17 PERSONAL SERVICES * 398,113 

18 OTHER EXPENSES 1,938,253 
TOTAL 2,336,366 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for WATER by a Majority Vote: 
WATER 

19 PERSONAL SERVICES * 1,724,715 

20 OTHER EXPENSES * 2,176,400 
TOTAL 3,901,115 

Includes $0 from Water reserves * 

WATER AND SEWER TOTAL 6,237,481 

less budgeted Revenues * 

NET TOTAL 6,237,481 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for FIXED by a Majority Vote: 
FIXED 

2 1 GR LAW TECH HS * 494,9 1 5 

22 DEBT SERVICE 13,312,391 

23 GENERAL INSURANCE 640,500 

24 UNEMPLOYMENT COMP. 100,000 

25 RETIREMENT FUND 4,635,498 

26 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND * 12,440,000 
TOTAL 31,623,304 



GRAND TOTAL * 130,81 7,866 

less budgeted Revenues * (2,215.226) 

NET TOTAL * 128,602,640 



216 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - OCTOBER 7, 2009 

ARTICLE 4 - 2009 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING SPECIAL ARTICLES 
As amended at the Special Town Meeting on October 7, 2009 

SPECIAL ARTICLES 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM TAXATION 

Article 5 of the Annual Town Meeting (FY 2010 
Capital Projects Fund) as amended at the Special Town 
Article 6 Meeting October 7, 2009 $1,246,000 

SPECIAL ARTICLE FROM TRANSFER OF FUNDS 

From Article 29 of the 2009 Annual Town Meeting - 
Water Main Construction and Reconstruction - as 
Article 8 amended at the Special Town Meeting October 7, 2009 $400,000 

To Water Reserves $400,000 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Thomas Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a 
Majority vote to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 8:50 P.M. 

A true record 

ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



217 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR SPECIAL DEMOCRATIC STATE PRIMARY ANDOVER MA 12/08/2009 
Prec 1 Prec 2 Prec 3 Prec 4 Prec 5 Prec 6 Prec 7 Prec 8 Prec 9 Totals 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS (1) 



MICHAEL E. CAPUANO 


98 


95 


108 


84 


92 


76 


87 


92 


94 


826 


MARTHA COAKLEY 


222 


168 


197 


141 


144 


163 


161 


200 


181 


1577 


ALAN A KHAZEI 


116 


59 


72 


54 


51 


75 


63 


98 


72 


660 


STEPHEN G. PAGLtUCA 


39 


30 


45 


56 


59 


43 


45 


40 


51 


408 


Blanks 


1 





2 


1 








1 








5 


Misc. Others 











2 








1 


1 





4 


Total votes 


476 


352 


424 


338 


346 


357 


358 


431 


398 


3480 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR SPECIAL REPUBLICAN STATE PRIMARY ANDOVER MA 12/08/2009 
Prec 1 Prec 2 Prec 3 Prec 4 Prec 5 Prec 6 Prec 7 Prec 8 Prec 9 Totals 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS (1) 

SCOTT P. BROWN 99 

JACK E ROBINSON 9 

Blanks 1 

Misc. Others 1 

Total votes 110 



99 


109 


105 


92 


113 


123 


143 


139 


1022 


12 


7 


11 


8 


9 


20 


23 


8 


107 


2 











1 





1 





5 





2 





2 





1 








6 


L13 


118 


116 


102 


123 


144 


167 


147 


1140 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR SPECIAL LIBERTARIAN STATE PRIMARY ANDOVER MA 12/08/2009 
Prec 1 Prec 2 Prec 3 Prec 4 Prec 5 Prec 6 Prec 7 Prec 8 Prec 9 Totals 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS (1) 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

Total votes 










































1 











1 














1 











1 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR SPECIAL STATE ELECTION ANDOVER MA 1/19/2010 

Prec 1 Prec 2 Prec 3 Prec 4 Prec 5 Prec 6 Prec 7 Prec 8 Prec 9 



Totals 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS (1) 

SCOTT P. BROWN (REP) 729 

MARTHA COAKLEY (DEM) 782 

JOSEPH L KENNEDY (LIB) 10 

Blanks 1 

Misc. Others 2 

Total votes 1524 



896 


932 


924 


941 


970 


968 


1025 


953 


8338 


600 


764 


530 


607 


553 


649 


753 


667 


5905 


7 


12 


5 


5 


5 


15 


10 


12 


81 


1 


1 




















3 








2 


1 














5 


L504 


1709 


1461 


1554 


1528 


1632 


1788 


1632 


14332 



218 



HOW TO REACH YOUR FEDERAL & STATE ELECTED OFFICIALS 

United States Senators: 

The Honorable Scott P. Brown (R) 

2400 John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Boston, MA 02203 

617-565-3170 

317 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

202-224-4543 



One Bowdoin Square, 10 th Floor, Boston, MA 021 14 

>nd 



The Honorable John F. Kerry (D) 

One Bowdoin ! 

617-565-8519 

218 Russell Senate Office Building - 2 n0 Floor, Washington, DC 20510 

202-224-2742 

www.Kerry.senate.gov/contact/emaiI.cfm 

United States Representative: 

The Honorable Niki S. Tsongas (D) 

Fifth Congressional District 

1 1 Kearney Square, Lowell, MA 01 852 

978-459-0101 

2229 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515 

202-225-3411 

askniki@mail.house.gov 

State Senator: 

Susan C. Tucker (D) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

State House, Room 424, Boston, MA 02 1 33 

617-722-1612 

stucker@senate.state.ma.us 

State Representatives: 

Barry R. Finegold (D) 

Seventeenth Essex District (Andover Precincts 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 9) 

State House, Room 275, Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-2396 

rep.barryfinegold@hou.state.ma.us 

Barbara A. LTtalien (D) 

Eighteenth Essex District (Andover Precincts 1 , 7 & 8) 

State House, Room 238, Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-2380 

rep.barbararitalien@hou.state.ma.us 

219 



HOW TO REACH YOUR LOCAL ELECTED OFFICIALS 

Board of Selectmen: 

Alex J. Vispoli, Chairman 
7 Alison Way 
978-475-7661 

avispoli(S>comcast.net 



Mary K. Lyman, Vice Chairman 
50 School Street 
978-470-2685 
iameslyman82@hotrnail.com 



Gerald Stabile, Jr. 
8 Blueberry Hill Road 
978-475-6060 
istabilejr(g) / gmail.net 



Brian P. Major 
1 1 Odyssey Way 
978-470-3428 
bmmajor(g),comcast.com 



Ted E. Teichert 
5 Dufton Road 
978-475-1087 
tteichert(g)comcast.net 



220 



HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 

Mailing Address: Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street, Andover, MA 01810 

Business Hours at the Town Offices: 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. Monday - Friday 

(Comm. Dev. & Planning - 8:00 A.M. - 3:00 P.M.) 
Telephone Numbers: 

POLICE/FIRE-RESCUE - EMERGENCY 911 

Fire-Rescue - Business 978-623-8466 

Police Department - Business 978-475-041 1 

Town Manager 978-623-8225 

DCS Classes & Activities 978-623-8273/8274 

Department of Public Works 978-623-8350 
Department of Public Works - Highway Division 978-623-8426 

Human Resources Office 978-623-8530 

Memorial Hall Library 978-623-8400 

Senior Center 978-623-8321 

Superintendent of Schools 978-623-8501 

Andover's Home Page: http://www.andoverma.gov 

Memorial Hall Library's Home Page: http://www.mhl.org 

Andover's Population: 32,011 

Square Miles: 32 

Number of Acres: 19,900 

272 parcels totaling 1,953.33 acres controlled by the Conservation Commission 

1,200 acres owned by A.V.I.S. 

889 acres owned by Commonwealth - Harold Parker State Forest 

Town Meeting and Election: Town Election is held the fourth Tuesday of March. 

Annual Town Meeting is generally held four weeks 
following the Town Election. 

Voter Registration Information: Call Town Clerk's Office at 978-623-8255 

Andover's Tax Rate: $13.19- Residential and Open Space 

$21.33 - Commercial/Industrial & Personal Property 



221 



When are Taxes Due: 



Taxes are due quarterly on the following dates: 
August 1 st - November 1 st - February 1 st - May 1 £ 



Excise Tax Information: Call the Assessor's Office at 978-623-8264 

Recycling Information: 

Questions: Call the Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 

Curbside Pick-up: Every other week - place curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pickup 

day. Recyclable material inclusive of glass (all colors, steel & tin 
cans, aluminum containers and #1 through #7 plastics. Recyclable 
paper products include: newspapers, magazines, junk mail, office 
paper, paperboard (cereal & cracker boxes - liners removed) and 
corrugated containers. Cardboard - please break down, flatten and 
fold boxes, cartons & other pieces of cardboard into 2'x2'xl' 
bundles - then tie or tape them together and place next to your bin. 

Complaints/Information: Call Integrated Paper Recyclers at 1-800-933-3128, the 

Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 ext. 515 or e-mail at 
dpw-business(g),ando verma. gov . 



Compost Site: 



High Plain Road (Bald Hill area). Leaves and grass clippings only. 
Clippings must be removed from container used to transport for 
dumping. All contaminated loads will be rejected. Fines will be 
assessed for illegal dumping. Please visit 

www.andoverma.gov/compost for the days and times site is open 
or call the Plant & Facilities Department at 978-623-8280. 



Trash Collection Information: 



Curbside Pickup : 



Every week - place curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pickup day. 
Household rubbish is limited to 4 bags or barrels or the equivalent 
of 135 gallons maximum per residence. One bulky item is allowed 
per week in addition to household trash, (may change in FY-2010) 



Complaints or Inquiries: 



How to Dispose of an Appliance: 



Call Allied Waste Republic Services at 1-800-442-9006, 
the Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 ext. 515 
or e-mail at dpw-business(S>andoverma. gov . 

Appliances can no longer be left curbside - their disposal is 
the homeowner's responsibility. A list of private disposal 
options may be found on page 6 of the "Recycling and 
Trash Guide for Residents" at www. ando verma. gov . 



Pothole or Snow Removal Complaint: Call the Highway Division at 978-623-8426 



222 



Pothole Claims: 



Must submit a letter to the Town Manager's Office within thirty days of 
the date of the incident attaching copies of invoices for expenses incurred 
or contact the office at 978-623-8225 with any questions. 



Where to Inquire About or Obtain Licenses & Permits: 



Ballfield Permits & Rentals 

Birth Certificate 

Building Permits 

(construction, plumbing, gas, electrical) 

Business Certificate 

Compost Site Permit 

Death Certificate 

Dog License 

Fields Rental 

Fishing & Hunting License 

Food Service License 



Liquor License (Annual or One-Day) 

Marriage License 

Open Air Burning Permit 

Passports 

Smoke Detector Permit 

Street Opening Permit 
The Park Rental 
Town House Rental 
Zoning Bylaw Variance 



Facilities Coordinator 

Town Clerk's Office 

Building Division 
(Office Hours: 8:00 A.M. 

Building Division and 
Town Clerk's Office 

Plant & Facilities Dept. 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Facilities Coordinator 

Town Clerk's Office 

Health Division 

and/or 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Fire Department 

Town Clerk's Office 
Fire Department 

Dept. of Public Works 

Town Manager's Office 

Facilities Coordinator 

Building Division 

and/or 

Board of Appeals Office 



978-623-8450 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8301 
10:00 A.M.) 

978-623-8301 
978-623-8255 

978-623-8280 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8450 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8295 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8307 
or 623-8343 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8307 
or 623-8343 

978-623-8350 

978-623-8225 

978-623-8450 

978-623-8301 

978-623-8315 



223